Jump to content


Photo

Pedants' Paradise


  • Please log in to reply
3093 replies to this topic

#1 Czerny

Czerny

    Virtuoso

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 4253 posts
  • Member: 21097
    Joined: 07-December 07

Posted 29 December 2010 - 11:46

This may have been done before - if so, apologies - but I'm bored, so I'm going to do it again. I've noticed that there have been several language-related comments recently, so I simply thought we could put them all together in one place.

The two intentions of this thread are that it should be a "safe haven" to post those little (or large) grammar and spelling niggles that really bug you, and it can also be somewhere you can come to ask advice about rules of which you are unsure (never end a sentence with a preposition).

I hope Cyrilla won't mind me mentioning that "here, here" (rather than "hear, hear") and "definate" (rather than "definite") are two of her pet peeves, plus someone mentioned "should of". I'm going to add "alot" and the wrong use of practice / practise. Oh, and confusion between "I", "me" and "myself".

One I'm less sure of is the precise usage of who / that / which, so if anyone has any handy hints for that one it would be appreciated.
  • 0

#2 maggiemay

maggiemay

    Maestro

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 19517 posts
  • Member: 413
    Joined: 12-January 04
  • S E England

Posted 29 December 2010 - 11:50

hee-hee
*rubs hands in glee*

One of my pet peeves (yes, I have emailed on same) is the sloppy use of the word 'unique'.

No, radio 3 presenter, it does not make sense to say 'very unique'.
  • 0

#3 Czerny

Czerny

    Virtuoso

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 4253 posts
  • Member: 21097
    Joined: 07-December 07

Posted 29 December 2010 - 11:57

QUOTE(maggiemay @ Dec 29 2010, 11:50 AM)  

hee-hee
*rubs hands in glee*

laugh.gif That's the spirit!
  • 0

#4 miffy

miffy

    Virtuoso

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2593 posts
  • Member: 43225
    Joined: 27-October 08

Posted 29 December 2010 - 12:07

I'm glad you mentioned definate/definite - that's one of the words my phone corrects me on - wrongly..is one American or do they both exist?
Practice - noun, practise - verb?
The 'it's' from the other thread - I know it means 'it is', but how about when something is belonging to 'it'? is there an apostrophe then?

My husband has a pet hate - the over use of the word prodigy - whether attached with child, or on its (apostrophe or not??) own. What makes someone a prodigy rather than a brilliant soloist, amazing musician, or whatever?
  • 0

#5 Czerny

Czerny

    Virtuoso

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 4253 posts
  • Member: 21097
    Joined: 07-December 07

Posted 29 December 2010 - 12:14

QUOTE(miffy @ Dec 29 2010, 12:07 PM)  

I'm glad you mentioned definate/definite - that's one of the words my phone corrects me on - wrongly..is one American or do they both exist?
Practice - noun, practise - verb?
The 'it's' from the other thread - I know it means 'it is', but how about when something is belonging to 'it'? is there an apostrophe then?

My husband has a pet hate - the over use of the word prodigy - whether attached with child, or on its (apostrophe or not??) own. What makes someone a prodigy rather than a brilliant soloist, amazing musician, or whatever?

Definitely is related to "definitive". I don't think "definately" exists in any context.

Yes, you're right about practice / practise.

If something belongs to it, use "its" - no apostrophe.

Prodigy is simply from "prodigious" (meaning, basically, "a lot of") but is used (connotatively, rather than definitively, I think) for children showing a prodigious talent.
  • 0

#6 flobiano

flobiano

    Prodigy

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1552 posts
  • Member: 73855
    Joined: 27-August 09

Posted 29 December 2010 - 12:20

Yay - permission to be pedantic! tongue.gif

Maybe we can also add tips that help us remember things!

I remember my physics teacher writing on my work that sepArate has A RAT in it - and she drew a picture of a rat next to it! I've never spelt (er spelled) unsure.gif blush.gif it wrong since! biggrin.gif

Also stationEry has an E in it for Envelopes when referring to paper products.

complEmentary has an E if it complEtes the things it refers to, rather than complImentary which could refer to me saying how lovely you all are. smile.gif
If something belongs to "it" it is (it's) "its" - I think it is the only excpetion to the possessive rule regarding apostrophes. I could be wrong though.
Yes, practice is noun and practise is verb - I remember that by comparing with advice and advise.
My own pet hate at the moment is the overuse of the word iconic - to the point where it has become completely meaningless! grrr

So is it spelled or spelt? I am now completely unsure! sad.gif



  • 0

#7 Czerny

Czerny

    Virtuoso

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 4253 posts
  • Member: 21097
    Joined: 07-December 07

Posted 29 December 2010 - 12:25

QUOTE(flobiano @ Dec 29 2010, 12:20 PM)  

So is it spelled or spelt? I am now completely unsure! sad.gif

Thanks - they're all useful tips.

As far as I'm aware you can use both "spelled" and "spelt", just like "spoiled" and "spoilt" and several others.
  • 0

#8 aesir22

aesir22

    Prodigy

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1002 posts
  • Member: 74120
    Joined: 30-August 09
  • Darlington

Posted 29 December 2010 - 12:29

Incidentally (sp?) they are considering changing the spelling of definite to definate, as it is spelt wrong on such an enormous scale they say it may warrant changing!

I also hate the word 'tasty' I know it isn't really an issue here, just thought I would share smile.gif
  • 0

#9 Guest: lucky045_*

Guest: lucky045_*
  • Guests
  • Member: 0
    Joined: --

Posted 29 December 2010 - 12:29

I get annoyed when people say less instead of fewer, or vice versa. Also, incorrect use of the term "literally" drives me crazy (metaphorically). I get so annoyed by people saying things like 'she is literally driving me up the wall!'.

'They're', 'there' and 'their' are all different words with distinct meanings. Likewise 'your' and 'you're'.

Can anyone explain to me why something cannot be "so fun" though? Since Miranda started I've been saying "such fun" anyway, but I don't really understand why it's necessary...
  • 0

#10 Maizie

Maizie

    Virtuoso

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 6298 posts
  • Member: 9360
    Joined: 05-February 07
  • Bishop's Stortford, Hertfordshire

Posted 29 December 2010 - 12:33

QUOTE(Czerny @ Dec 29 2010, 12:25 PM)  
As far as I'm aware you can use both "spelled" and "spelt", just like "spoiled" and "spoilt" and several others.
Burned and burnt, too.
In US English, they will only use the -ed version. Spelt, to them, is a grain smile.gif

The way to remember how to spell permanent is that it has a man in it. My mother taught me this, along with the concept of irony.


  • 1

#11 corenfa

corenfa

    Virtuoso

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 5725 posts
  • Member: 95861
    Joined: 28-March 10
  • Here

Posted 29 December 2010 - 12:35

I hate it when nouns are converted into verbs. This often happens in corporate jargon. The worst example I have come across is "end-of-lifed". eg. "That version of software has been end-of-lifed".

NNNGGGGGGGGGHHHHHHHHHHH
  • 0

#12 Czerny

Czerny

    Virtuoso

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 4253 posts
  • Member: 21097
    Joined: 07-December 07

Posted 29 December 2010 - 12:39

QUOTE(Maizie @ Dec 29 2010, 12:33 PM)  

The way to remember how to spell permanent is that it has a man in it. My mother taught me this, along with the concept of irony.

So true. dry.gif

QUOTE(corenfa @ Dec 29 2010, 12:35 PM)  

I hate it when nouns are converted into verbs. This often happens in corporate jargon. The worst example I have come across is "end-of-lifed". eg. "That version of software has been end-of-lifed".

NNNGGGGGGGGGHHHHHHHHHHH

That's truly hideous. "Diarise" is another ghastly one. ill.gif

I also hate "upcoming". We have a perfectly good word with exactly the same meaning: "forthcoming". Use it!
  • 0

#13 Guest: lucky045_*

Guest: lucky045_*
  • Guests
  • Member: 0
    Joined: --

Posted 29 December 2010 - 12:41

QUOTE(corenfa @ Dec 29 2010, 12:35 PM)  

I hate it when nouns are converted into verbs. This often happens in corporate jargon. The worst example I have come across is "end-of-lifed". eg. "That version of software has been end-of-lifed".

NNNGGGGGGGGGHHHHHHHHHHH


I actually love that. It's one of my favourite things to do with language. tongue.gif I'll be aware of it in future.
  • 0

#14 miffy

miffy

    Virtuoso

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2593 posts
  • Member: 43225
    Joined: 27-October 08

Posted 29 December 2010 - 12:44

"I say to you"..
"At the end of the day"...
"Step up to the plate"...

AAAAAAAARRRRRGGGGHHH laugh.gif
  • 0

#15 corenfa

corenfa

    Virtuoso

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 5725 posts
  • Member: 95861
    Joined: 28-March 10
  • Here

Posted 29 December 2010 - 12:46

QUOTE(lucky045 @ Dec 29 2010, 12:41 PM)  

QUOTE(corenfa @ Dec 29 2010, 12:35 PM)  

I hate it when nouns are converted into verbs. This often happens in corporate jargon. The worst example I have come across is "end-of-lifed". eg. "That version of software has been end-of-lifed".

NNNGGGGGGGGGHHHHHHHHHHH


I actually love that. It's one of my favourite things to do with language. tongue.gif I'll be aware of it in future.


It's different when it's in an informal setting like this, sorry, I should have said (after all i did use the word "woundupness" in another thread tongue.gif ). What I can't stand about my example is that it is done to make it sound more official or important. It doesn't.
  • 0