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16th notes piano.


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#1 Happyhacker

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Posted 20 April 2017 - 11:50

In a simple piece I am trying to cope with it has. 4/4 measure with some triplet notes where the 1st note is a 16th where the 16th bar does not extend across the the "middle" note, then there is the middle note and another 16th final note where the 16th bar extends a short way back towards the middle note. There is not dotted note here. Is this a 16th Triplet with even spacing between the three notes or do I bring the middle note nearer to the first note? Thanks.
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#2 fsharpminor

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Posted 20 April 2017 - 12:54

Sounds as if it isnt a triplet  (which would be indicated by a '3' above) but 16th 8th 16th , or as we would say semiquaver quaver semiquaver grouped together.  Yes its 3 notes but not a triplet in the sense that you play 3 in he time of 2.


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#3 linda.ff

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Posted 20 April 2017 - 14:02

I agree with f#m - my usual description of the note-lengths is that if there's one beam (you confused me by saying "bar" - if you're using American terminology, most British musicians will read "bar" as meaning "measure", so best to call it a beam - and if it's not joined on to anything else, just a separate note, it's a "flag") it's a quaver/8th and if there is a second beam coming from at least one side of the stem then it's a 16th. What you see is a half-sized version of the quaver-crotchet-quaver pattern ta-taaa-ta (which in itself is a half-size d version of crotchet-minim-crotchet, and so on.

 

16th-triplets would only take up the length of an 8th note, triplets are three in the time that two would normally take up.


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#4 Happyhacker

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Posted 20 April 2017 - 20:49

OK, three notes then, a beam across all three with 16th notes either end and an 8th in the middle (stem goes up to top beam). Would this be three notes da daaa da, or da da da?
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#5 fsharpminor

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Posted 20 April 2017 - 21:05

OK, three notes then, a beam across all three with 16th notes either end and an 8th in the middle (stem goes up to top beam). Would this be three notes da daaa da, or da da da?

Da daaa Da


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#6 Hildegard

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 06:45

As fsharpminor says, Da daaa Da.

It is sometimes called the ragtime rhythm:

 

entmotif.gif


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#7 Happyhacker

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 07:19

Ah, I see it is the first one of the first motive shown. So the first note is on the beat, the second on the "e", the third on the "a" the middle note lasting of course a quaver. Confirm? And thanks.
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#8 LoneM

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 09:49

Not sure where you get the notes from - there is no '"a" in the first motif at all??

 

The first note "e" (semiquaver / 16th) is on the beat, the second note "c" (quaver / 8th ) lasts twice as long, and the third note "e" is another semiquaver. Together they last a crotchet / quarter and thus half the value of the 2/4 bar / measure.  The vertical alignment of the left-hand notes (in straight quavers) shows how the syncopated right hand fits in.

 

If you are finding the syncopation difficult, try it clapping the rhythm below slowly with a metronome set to 120, with each tick counted as a semiquaver and counting out loud:

 

1    2-3    4    5 - 6     7 - 8  |

da daaa da   daaa   daaa   |

 

(i.e. semiquaver-quaver-semiquaver quaver-quaver.)

 

Repeat ad lib! Once you can do this comfortably, try tapping the basic (metronome) quaver beat with your left hand on your left knee while tapping the syncopated rhythm with your right hand on your right knee.

 

It will soon come with practice - we all had to learn it like this!

 

 


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#9 nigheandonn

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 11:34

I don't think the e and a are notes, they're the 2nd and 4th beats of a (American?) 1-e-&-a counting system.


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#10 Happyhacker

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 15:06

I would then count the measure as "1 e (and) a 2 (e) and a" the notes at the bracketed of course absent. I think that's how to count semiquavers.
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#11 Flossie

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 15:19

I would then count the measure as "1 e (and) a 2 (e) and a" the notes at the bracketed of course absent. I think that's how to count semiquavers.

 

It isn't how they are counted in the UK, and this is a UK based forum which means that people will be using UK approaches and terminology.  The UK and US use different languages for musical notation, and I think this is causing some confusion for you.  


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#12 linda.ff

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 15:53

 

I would then count the measure as "1 e (and) a 2 (e) and a" the notes at the bracketed of course absent. I think that's how to count semiquavers.

 

It isn't how they are counted in the UK, and this is a UK based forum which means that people will be using UK approaches and terminology.  The UK and US use different languages for musical notation, and I think this is causing some confusion for you.  

 

It's how it was counted in the samba band I played with and that was definitely in the UK. I don't think it is a particularly American method: it's just an extension of 1 & 2 & 3 & 4 &. 


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#13 LoneM

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 15:56

Thanks for the explanation - I was certainly confused! My apologies, and I'll now bow out of this thread.


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#14 Happyhacker

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 16:28

I would then count the measure as "1 e (and) a 2 (e) and a" the notes at the bracketed of course absent. I think that's how to count semiquavers.

 
It isn't how they are counted in the UK, and this is a UK based forum which means that people will be using UK approaches and terminology.  The UK and US use different languages for musical notation, and I think this is causing some confusion for you.

Please explain how it is counted in the UK as I'm there! Thanks.
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#15 sbhoa

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 16:31

 

 

I would then count the measure as "1 e (and) a 2 (e) and a" the notes at the bracketed of course absent. I think that's how to count semiquavers.

 
It isn't how they are counted in the UK, and this is a UK based forum which means that people will be using UK approaches and terminology.  The UK and US use different languages for musical notation, and I think this is causing some confusion for you.

Please explain how it is counted in the UK as I'm there! Thanks.

 

There are probably several ways.

The similar way to yours that I might count 16th notes is 1 er and a  (1 and would be counting 8th notes).


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