Jump to content


Photo

Gcse Music


  • Please log in to reply
19 replies to this topic

#1 Aileen

Aileen

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 293 posts
  • Member: 6707
    Joined: 20-April 06
  • West Coast of Scotland

Posted 17 November 2006 - 17:45

I'm from Scotland and just by looking at some of the posts about GCSE music it seems to be much harder than our Credit Level Standard Grade.

What do you actually have to know for GCSE? What periods of music do you cover and what level of playing do you have to play at? I'm really just interested to see how it differs! Just tell me anything!! smile.gif
  • 0

#2 Car Expert

Car Expert

    Maestro

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 30912 posts
  • Member: 3680
    Joined: 15-May 05
  • UK - rural North Norfolk\East Anglia. Lincoln 104 miles. Ipswich 66 miles. Oxford 193 miles. Lewes 199 miles.

Posted 17 November 2006 - 17:49

Depends which board you do. For Edexcel, you have to learn 4 Areas of Study for the Listening & Appraising exam at the end of year 11. The Areas of Study include Classical Music, 1600-1899, Modern Classical Music, 1900-, Music From Around The World, and Modern Music such as 12-bar blues and Club Dance Remix.

I think being about Grade 3 or 4 at least on any instrument is recommended.

Car Expert
  • 0

#3 Rosemary7391

Rosemary7391

    Virtuoso

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 7865 posts
  • Member: 7195
    Joined: 18-June 06
  • Durham

Posted 17 November 2006 - 18:11

Grade 3 is considered standard (edexcel again) - if you play a piece easier than that you will lose marks, harder and you will gain marks. Theory? About grade 2, although it looks like around half my class will get by although barely music-literate.
  • 0

#4 harpist

harpist

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 452 posts
  • Member: 7347
    Joined: 09-August 06
  • Scotland

Posted 17 November 2006 - 18:14

QUOTE(Aileen @ Nov 17 2006, 05:45 PM) View Post

I'm from Scotland and just by looking at some of the posts about GCSE music it seems to be much harder than our Credit Level Standard Grade.


I was just thinking that today! - from some of the posts it seems impossible but from what it says here it sounds pretty similar. I don't think there are too many differences unsure.gif
  • 0

#5 Car Expert

Car Expert

    Maestro

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 30912 posts
  • Member: 3680
    Joined: 15-May 05
  • UK - rural North Norfolk\East Anglia. Lincoln 104 miles. Ipswich 66 miles. Oxford 193 miles. Lewes 199 miles.

Posted 17 November 2006 - 18:18

QUOTE(Rosemary7391 @ Nov 17 2006, 06:11 PM) View Post
Grade 3 is considered standard (edexcel again) - if you play a piece easier than that you will lose marks, harder and you will gain marks.
Of course, for the solo piece of coursework, choose something that you can play well, and something which you are not likely to mess up. If you do mess up the piece first time round (if you record it at school), your teacher should give you more opportunities to record it again and again until you feel that you are happy with it.

Car Expert
  • 0

#6 Rosemary7391

Rosemary7391

    Virtuoso

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 7865 posts
  • Member: 7195
    Joined: 18-June 06
  • Durham

Posted 17 November 2006 - 18:22

QUOTE(Car Expert @ Nov 17 2006, 06:18 PM) View Post

QUOTE(Rosemary7391 @ Nov 17 2006, 06:11 PM) View Post
Grade 3 is considered standard (edexcel again) - if you play a piece easier than that you will lose marks, harder and you will gain marks.
Of course, for the solo piece of coursework, choose something that you can play well, and something which you are not likely to mess up. If you do mess up the piece first time round (if you record it at school), your teacher should give you more opportunities to record it again and again until you feel that you are happy with it.

Car Expert


That kinda goes without saying... Its a performance, I have always treated it as such. I don't like the record it again and again option. Its not the same as playing to an audience that just happens to include a recorder.
  • 0

#7 snhs

snhs

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 775 posts
  • Member: 7044
    Joined: 02-June 06

Posted 17 November 2006 - 21:15

QUOTE(Aileen @ Nov 17 2006, 05:45 PM) View Post

I'm from Scotland and just by looking at some of the posts about GCSE music it seems to be much harder than our Credit Level Standard Grade.

What do you actually have to know for GCSE? What periods of music do you cover and what level of playing do you have to play at? I'm really just interested to see how it differs! Just tell me anything!! smile.gif


I'm also in Scotland but i did the Int. 2 (before they made it easier) and at that point i would definitely say it was more difficult than Std grade or GCSE. Since then though they've decreased the instrumental requirements by a grade and turned inventing into a NAB so thats probably lowered it to around the same level. Although i don't know it for a fact my guess is that the SQA are looking to remove Std. grades entirely so they'll probably decrease the difficulty in all the Int. 2 exams to compensate.

In addition i wouldn't be judging the whole course by what people are asking on this forum as they do tend to be the more able students and do sometimes stray beyond the requirements of the course. Besides which they will only be asking if they are particularly stuck with something so you will only actually hear the most difficult aspects of any couses mentioned.

If your still worried about the standards of education though just wait until Adv Highers - regardless of what anyone might say they are definitely more difficult than A levels. ohmy.gif
  • 0

#8 Reverie

Reverie

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 414 posts
  • Member: 5839
    Joined: 13-January 06
  • Edinburgh-ish

Posted 18 November 2006 - 18:18

QUOTE(snhs @ Nov 17 2006, 09:15 PM) View Post

If your still worried about the standards of education though just wait until Adv Highers - regardless of what anyone might say they are definitely more difficult than A levels. ohmy.gif

Not in Music though, I don't think. There isn't any harmony etc. in the AH course, but there is in A Level. But in general, Advanced Highers are considered harder, for lots of reasons (mark made up of one big exam at the end of a year as opposed to being built up of modules over two years, no resitting modules like they do in AS level, big dissertations/investigations...oh, and pretty shoddy resources dry.gif ). AHs are supposed to be first year university level (except music rolleyes.gif ).

Anyway, back to the original question, GCSE is harder than Standard Grade because you sit GCSEs when you're 16, and typical S Grade students are younger than that (I was 13 when I started my Standard Grades, and 15 when I sat them).
  • 0

#9 lacy-saige

lacy-saige

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 4 posts
  • Member: 8556
    Joined: 04-December 06

Posted 11 December 2006 - 17:08

GCSE = Hard
Standard Grades = Easy

For GCSE, i had to do so much coursework it was unreal. And then you have the aural exam, then the theory, and then the practical. We had to sit it in two instruments as well! But at the end of it, you feel soo proud of yourself.

Another thing which makes them harder, is the sheer quantity of them that you are expected to sit. It was average in my school to sit about 10 of them. Whereas for my school in scotland it was about 5.
  • 0

#10 Rosemary7391

Rosemary7391

    Virtuoso

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 7865 posts
  • Member: 7195
    Joined: 18-June 06
  • Durham

Posted 11 December 2006 - 18:23

QUOTE(lacy-saige @ Dec 11 2006, 05:08 PM) View Post

GCSE = Hard
Standard Grades = Easy

For GCSE, i had to do so much coursework it was unreal. And then you have the aural exam, then the theory, and then the practical. We had to sit it in two instruments as well! But at the end of it, you feel soo proud of yourself.

Another thing which makes them harder, is the sheer quantity of them that you are expected to sit. It was average in my school to sit about 10 of them. Whereas for my school in scotland it was about 5.


That doesn't sound like the GCSE I know at all! We do 9 at my school , 10 if you're good at math and want to teach yourself stats. The GCSE music I am doing now requires 2 compositions and some performances, I can't remember how many off the top of my head. Certainly not an unreal amount over 2 years. And the only exam is a listening exam.
  • 0

#11 Car Expert

Car Expert

    Maestro

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 30912 posts
  • Member: 3680
    Joined: 15-May 05
  • UK - rural North Norfolk\East Anglia. Lincoln 104 miles. Ipswich 66 miles. Oxford 193 miles. Lewes 199 miles.

Posted 11 December 2006 - 18:28

QUOTE(Rosemary7391 @ Dec 11 2006, 06:23 PM) View Post
The GCSE music I am doing now requires 2 compositions and some performances, I can't remember how many off the top of my head. Certainly not an unreal amount over 2 years. And the only exam is a listening exam.
Yep, that's the same as mine (Edexcel). You have to do one solo piece and two compositions, one of which has to be an ensemble.

Car Expert

  • 0

#12 ben_walker446

ben_walker446

    Virtuoso

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 4861 posts
  • Member: 5524
    Joined: 10-December 05
  • Stoke-on-trent

Posted 11 December 2006 - 18:44

AQA Music:

Performing 25% - You must record two performances; 1)Solo 2) Ensemble

Composing 25% - You must compose one piece of music based on Music for Special Events

Integrated Assignment 25% - One composition based on a set assignment

Listening & Apprasing 25% - You must study the development of music, answer question.
  • 0

#13 Reverie

Reverie

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 414 posts
  • Member: 5839
    Joined: 13-January 06
  • Edinburgh-ish

Posted 13 December 2006 - 16:26

QUOTE(lacy-saige @ Dec 11 2006, 05:08 PM) View Post

For GCSE, I had to do so much coursework it was unreal. And then you have the aural exam, then the theory, and then the practical. We had to sit it in two instruments as well! But at the end of it, you feel soo proud of yourself.

Another thing which makes them harder, is the sheer quantity of them that you are expected to sit. It was average in my school to sit about 10 of them. Whereas for my school in Scotland it was about 5.

5 Standard Grades?! That's not very many...most people do 8. huh.gif And you do have to play two instuments for Standard Grade Music as well (one for an examiner; one as a recording).
  • 0

#14 InvisibleFiend

InvisibleFiend

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 21 posts
  • Member: 7494
    Joined: 24-August 06

Posted 15 December 2006 - 23:04

Interesting. In Ireland we sit the Junior Cert at 15. 9 subjects is the minimum but most people do 12 or 13 then drop to 7 or 8 for the leaving Cert (age 18).

In music is pretty much a joke. You study 3 Set Works and 8 Set Pieces during the 3 year course. In the exam you get listening questions on them and pieces or related styles. Also a question on Irish music, writing an 8 bar melody (I kid you not), chords and triads. As far as I remember. Those are all sat in one exam in June and a preformance infront of an examiner in March. Students can come out with a high level of science knowledge but not knowing how to read music.

Leaving Cert is of a halfdecent level.
After Easter:
50% practical: 6 pieces on 1 instrument or 8 on 2 + sightreading.

In June:
25% listening paper: a long question on each of set pieces (Bohemian Rhapsody, Gerald Barry's Piano Quartet, Jesu der du meine seele, Romeo and Juliet Fantasy); nonstudied piece; Irish music.

25% written paper: a harmony question [fill in cords and left hand]; 16 bar melody.

Can you lot really resit exams? We can't. sad.gif
  • 0

#15 snhs

snhs

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 775 posts
  • Member: 7044
    Joined: 02-June 06

Posted 16 December 2006 - 16:36

[quote name='Reverie' date='Dec 13 2006, 04:26 PM' post='433917']
[/quote]
5 Standard Grades?! That's not very many...most people do 8. huh.gif And you do have to play two instuments for Standard Grade Music as well (one for an examiner; one as a recording).
[/quote]
There is a big difference between doing two live for an examiner and one live with the secind being recorded (which can obviously be repeated). In addition (for Int. 2 at any rate) you have to do a performamce NAB requiring both performances to be recorded as well as the final exam.

  • 0