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Junior Strings Project At Rncm Manchester


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#1 Guest: zoda_*

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Posted 14 November 2004 - 16:02

I followed a CMorris tip through to an article on this project in the articles section of this website. The tip was given in a thread about Kodaly, which I was interested to find out more about after reading various of Violinia's lyrically waxed threads on the subject.

It seems 120 children of all abilities are currently on this course - they start at age 6 on a "first come, first served" basis - there is no entrance assessment. From such average beginnings they have had something like 6 or 8 (can't remember) people go on to Chethams, and 2 join the National Youth Orchestra.

They don't learn a musical instrument for a whole year- for the first year they do one two part lesson each week, one part of which is 45 mins learning about music through singing via this "Kodaly method", and the other part is 45 minutes linking music to movement in a method called "Dalcroze Eurythmics". After a year they start an instrument, but the Dalcroze/Kodaly lessons continue in addition throughout.

It makes me wonder if I'm going about things the right way starting straight off with instrumental lessons - I'm going to enquire as to whether there are any Kodaly or Dalcroze teachers in my area (Chester).

I found the above very interesting but I suspect even though the plan is not meant to be elitist, that knowledge of it may be restricted to those "in the know" simply by lack of advertising. Accordingly if anyone is interested the numbers given (which I intend to ring next week) are:

Rachel Lasance - 0161 907 5398
Penny Stirling - 0161 907 5348
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#2 Guest: Cyrilla_*

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Posted 16 November 2004 - 19:14

I think the Junior Strings project under Penny Stirling is relatively well known; I don't live in your area so I don't know what advertising is done.

I know both of the teachers very well - Karin Greenhead (Dalcroze) and Luke Dunlea (Kodaly). They teach the two approaches to post-grad RNCM students - both at their own level of musicianship and also the methodology to allow them to teach the approaches themselves.

We run a similar course for children at the Junior Guildhall in London - again, the children learn them for a year or two years prior to learning an instrument, something that I am TOTALLY in favour of. 'A child who plays before he sings may remain unmusical for a lifetime'.... I presume you're interested in this for your own children??

Please just ask if you want to know more about either approach. I have attended several Dalcroze classes and work closely with Dalcroze teachers (several who are products of the Junior Strings project), so I know a fair bit about it although I'm not Dalcroze-trained. I AM Kodaly-trained, though!

Good luck in your pursuit of K & D teachers - please let me know if I can help in any way.




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#3 Guest: zoda_*

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Posted 16 November 2004 - 20:44

Nice one Cyrilla! Thanks for your reply

What would be really helpful is if you have any tips for finding a Kodaly or Dalcroze teacher in the Chester area? I have been to their British Websites and there doesn't seem to be much of a list. Having worked out the logistics, I am disappointed to say the Junior strings project looks like too much travel after a school day - a 2 hour round trip without the usual Manchester traffic, plus 1.5 hours lessons, with the added problem of what to do with little brother. And that would be twice a week after the first year. It's a real shame because this project is the first opportunity I've seen to jump into the musical mainstream rather than dip our toes in the margins, and it sounds like the children get a good grounding without it ever feeling like effort.
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#4 Guest: zoda_*

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Posted 17 November 2004 - 15:07

Stand easy Cyrilla! News is NO Kodaly or Dalcrose courses in Chester. I've bitten the bullet and sent off the enrolment forms for JSP. Rachel Lasance tells me there's a good chance some places are still available, as some of the people on the waiting list have moved out of the area, but she will know for definite in the next few days. I've found a local taxi firm approved for local authority child care work who can take my daughter to Manchester, and my wife can collect from work at that end! Don't want to get too excited though, until I find out whether they've got a place.

By the way, for anyone like me whose knowledge of the world of music doesn't extend far beyond what they have read on this website, I found out during my phone call that "Kodaly" doesn't sound like "cuddly" with an "O" - it sounds like "Kode- ai - ee".
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#5 Guest: cecilia_*

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Posted 17 November 2004 - 17:22

QUOTE
I found out during my phone call that "Kodaly" doesn't sound like "cuddly" with an "O" - it sounds like "Kode- ai - ee"


It took me a while to make the connection between Cyrilla's "Kodaly" and my music teacher's "Kode-ai-ee" as well! Pronouncation can be so confusing... laugh.gif
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#6 Guest: Cyrilla_*

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Posted 17 November 2004 - 18:47

Actually the most authentic pronunciation *puts on best Hungarian accent* is 'Cod-eye'!! (Hungarian always has a stronger first syllable).

Keep me posted re your efforts, zoda! I know how difficult it is to find teachers of either disciplines in all areas of the country - there aren't that many of us around and - as with all teachers - there are bad eggs around as well as good ones. I've just heard of someone who has done TWO DAYS TRAINING who is employed by a university as a Kodaly teacher..*FUME* mad.gif mad.gif mad.gif
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#7 Guest: zoda_*

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Posted 19 November 2004 - 17:58

QUOTE (Cyrilla @ Nov 17 2004, 06:47 PM)
Actually the most authentic pronunciation *puts on best Hungarian accent* is 'Cod-eye'!! (Hungarian always has a stronger first syllable).

I was trogging through the rain in Crewe yesterday on my way back to the station, trying to say 'Cod - eye' in my best Hungarian accent, when I realised I don't know what Hungarian sounds like - it kept coming out like a guard from "Tenko".
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#8 Guest: Cyrilla_*

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Posted 19 November 2004 - 22:51

QUOTE (zoda @ Nov 19 2004, 05:58 PM)
I realised I don't know what Hungarian sounds like - it kept coming out like a guard from "Tenko".

tongue.gif tongue.gif tongue.gif

It's actually very hard to describe a Hungarian accent! Hungarian has to be one of the hardest languages as it isn't like any other - but I love to listen to it.

I'm very sad at the moment as my golden goddess of Kodaly pedagogy - one of the most wonderful teachers and pedagogues I am ever likely to meet and the person I try to emulate more than any other - died last Saturday aged 54 - so I can hear HER voice loud and clear in my head (replete with American accent and colloquialisms!).
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#9 Guest: Violinia_*

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Posted 20 November 2004 - 16:28

QUOTE
I've just heard of someone who has done TWO DAYS TRAINING who is employed by a university as a Kodaly teacher..*FUME*


Hey! I just did six days' training at the Kodaly summer school this year: can I get a well-paid university job then? biggrin.gif

Violinia
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#10 Guest: all ears_*

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Posted 21 November 2004 - 00:59

Keep the posts coming! I would have enrolled Viohazard for Kodaly or a similar program *had I known that it existed* instead of violin when he was small...not that he didn't love violin, but he sang all day long (still does, literally, I keep getting notes from his school teacher...), so singing would have been the perfect place to begin "formal" music.

I'm surprised and a bit disappointed that Kodaly is so hard to find even in the UK...and its a pity that there isn't (or didn't used to be, anyway) much in the way of accessible or self-taught materials. I ordered a book unseen from an overseas catalogue once, and found that it depended so heavily on some other, un-named book that it was totally useless. Just enough to tantalize...

So, MORE MATERIALS PLEASE, if any Kodaly teachers or course developers are out there!! Publish, publish, publish! Record, record, record!

... rolleyes.gif thank you!
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#11 Guest: carys_*

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Posted 21 November 2004 - 01:03

QUOTE (Cyrilla @ Nov 19 2004, 11:51 PM)
I'm very sad at the moment as my golden goddess of Kodaly pedagogy - one of the most wonderful teachers and pedagogues I am ever likely to meet and the person I try to emulate more than any other - died last Saturday aged 54 - so I can hear HER voice loud and clear in my head (replete with American accent and colloquialisms!).

Ahhh, I'm sorry to hear that - so sad, and she was quite young.
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#12 Guest: zoda_*

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Posted 21 November 2004 - 02:00

I'm sorry about your teacher Cyrilla. Sounds like she achieved more and will be remembered longer than many, despite dying so relatively young.
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#13 Guest: Cyrilla_*

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Posted 21 November 2004 - 12:03

Thanks all - there are tributes to the wonderful Eva Vendrei on both the British Kodaly Academy and the Kodaly Institute websites (www.britishkodalyacademy.org and www.kodaly-inst.hu). Someone described the Hungarian teachers to me as having 'exceptional souls' which just about says it all...Kodaly is often a profound spiritual experience as well as a musical one, and Eva embodied all that was great about music, teaching, humanity, spirituality,...

Allears - there ARE published Kodaly materials but it really isn't the sort of thing you can self-teach very effectively - the books are best used after attending courses.

A major BKA project at the moment is developing a musicianship curriculum and exam structure. Presently we only have three levels of solfege attainment (Elementary, Intermediate, Advanced) which are achieved after a year's part-time study (one evening a week). We want to break this down into smaller chunks so that children/young people who are studying in a variety of teaching and learning situations can also take exams.

Our current idea is that there would be one or two Foundation levels (for very young children or adults who are complete beginners), then grades 1-4 (equivalent to our current Elementary), grades 5-8 (Intermediate) and a Diploma (Advanced). Well, that's the idea! We're toiling away at this but it's very early days. WHEN we have this sorted we will be producing teachers' and pupils' books and materials.

So watch this space!!
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#14 Guest: zoda_*

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Posted 11 January 2005 - 21:16

Hi Cyrilla,

update as requested!

My little girl went today for her first lessons at JSP. She was really excited. There were boys there. She quite liked the music also. Actually she's just got up for a drink of water, so I will let you tell her what she thinks:

i was really excited becos it was my first day there. laugh.gif cool.gif blink.gif


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#15 Guest: saxlover_*

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Posted 11 January 2005 - 21:33

awww how cute!
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