Jump to content


Photo

Music you "ought to" like but just aren't that into


  • Please log in to reply
91 replies to this topic

#31 barry-clari

barry-clari

    Maestro

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 40912 posts
  • Member: 5804
    Joined: 10-January 06
  • South East London

Posted 26 February 2011 - 22:32

My Poulenc views seem to put me in a minority of one laugh.gif
  • 0

#32 BerkshireMum

BerkshireMum

    Virtuoso

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 6685 posts
  • Member: 13405
    Joined: 20-July 07
  • West Berks

Posted 26 February 2011 - 23:27

QUOTE(barry-clari @ Feb 26 2011, 11:32 PM) View Post

My Poulenc views seem to put me in a minority of one laugh.gif

BerkshireSon was first given Poulenc's Romanza when he was 14 to look at over a holiday. I remember telling the teacher after said holiday that it was a pity she had given him such awful music at such a young age, as I thought it might put him off learning clarinet!

Teacher was more than shocked - she obviously thought me a complete Philistine. ph34r.gif

I must admit that over the years since then I have learned to quite like Poulenc, but it was a struggle for me, so I can see where you are coming from, Barry! tongue.gif Actually, my son has never got to like it either, although he played movements from the Clarinet Sonata for both grade 7 and grade 8 because his teacher thought it essential repertoire. I don't think I've ever heard him play it since!
  • 0

#33 barry-clari

barry-clari

    Maestro

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 40912 posts
  • Member: 5804
    Joined: 10-January 06
  • South East London

Posted 27 February 2011 - 07:30

QUOTE(BerkshireMum @ Feb 26 2011, 11:27 PM) View Post

QUOTE(barry-clari @ Feb 26 2011, 11:32 PM) View Post

My Poulenc views seem to put me in a minority of one laugh.gif

BerkshireSon was first given Poulenc's Romanza when he was 14 to look at over a holiday. I remember telling the teacher after said holiday that it was a pity she had given him such awful music at such a young age, as I thought it might put him off learning clarinet!

Teacher was more than shocked - she obviously thought me a complete Philistine. ph34r.gif

I must admit that over the years since then I have learned to quite like Poulenc, but it was a struggle for me, so I can see where you are coming from, Barry! tongue.gif Actually, my son has never got to like it either, although he played movements from the Clarinet Sonata for both grade 7 and grade 8 because his teacher thought it essential repertoire. I don't think I've ever heard him play it since!


hurrah.gif I'm in a minority of two laugh.gif
  • 0

#34 kingsley13

kingsley13

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 789 posts
  • Member: 63848
    Joined: 27-April 09

Posted 27 February 2011 - 10:09

QUOTE(barry-clari @ Feb 27 2011, 07:30 AM) View Post

QUOTE(BerkshireMum @ Feb 26 2011, 11:27 PM) View Post

QUOTE(barry-clari @ Feb 26 2011, 11:32 PM) View Post

My Poulenc views seem to put me in a minority of one laugh.gif

BerkshireSon was first given Poulenc's Romanza when he was 14 to look at over a holiday. I remember telling the teacher after said holiday that it was a pity she had given him such awful music at such a young age, as I thought it might put him off learning clarinet!

Teacher was more than shocked - she obviously thought me a complete Philistine. ph34r.gif

I must admit that over the years since then I have learned to quite like Poulenc, but it was a struggle for me, so I can see where you are coming from, Barry! tongue.gif Actually, my son has never got to like it either, although he played movements from the Clarinet Sonata for both grade 7 and grade 8 because his teacher thought it essential repertoire. I don't think I've ever heard him play it since!


hurrah.gif I'm in a minority of two laugh.gif



Three! smile.gif My friend loves Poulenc and she's always telling me about how amazing the Poulenc flute sonata is, so I tried to listen to it and I just didn't know why she liked it. When she played part of it in our GCSE music lesson at school, I enjoyed it slightly more, probably because it was live, and I did think she played it very well, but I still didn't like the actual piece!


The other one for me is Debussy's piano music. ph34r.gif I'm probably on my own for this one! The only one I actually like is Clair de Lune, but I don't want to learn it because it's so famous and everybody learns it! On the other hand, I do like Debussy's orchestral stuff.
  • 0

#35 corenfa

corenfa

    Virtuoso

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 4894 posts
  • Member: 95861
    Joined: 28-March 10
  • Here

Posted 27 February 2011 - 13:00

QUOTE(kingsley13 @ Feb 27 2011, 10:09 AM) View Post

...


The other one for me is Debussy's piano music. ph34r.gif I'm probably on my own for this one! The only one I actually like is Clair de Lune, but I don't want to learn it because it's so famous and everybody learns it! On the other hand, I do like Debussy's orchestral stuff.


I'm a pianist and I don't like all of Debussy's piano music - I like the earlier works, or the later ones which have a melody. I'm not that fond of the ones in which the piano is used just for sound effects. I know that it takes tremendous technical skill to pull it off, and I am in awe of people who can do it, but emotionally it doesn't do anything for me.


  • 0

#36 Misti

Misti

    Virtuoso

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3099 posts
  • Member: 879
    Joined: 31-March 04

Posted 27 February 2011 - 14:08

I generally refer to Polenc as 'Plonk', which may indicate my.. ambivelent attitudes.

That said, I prefer listening to his music than playing it. I don't find I can communicate much with it, myself, which combined with the technical traumas... nope would much rather listen to someone do it well! laugh.gif
  • 0

#37 anacrusis

anacrusis

    Virtuoso

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 5411 posts
  • Member: 4852
    Joined: 01-October 05
  • Edinburgh, Scotland

Posted 27 February 2011 - 14:19

QUOTE(DawnF @ Feb 26 2011, 08:51 PM) View Post

edit: ohmy.gif That's massive!!!! Sorry blush.gif


but utterly beautiful. No apologies needed wink.gif.
  • 0

#38 Tequila

Tequila

    Virtuoso

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3877 posts
  • Member: 34208
    Joined: 03-July 08

Posted 27 February 2011 - 14:32

QUOTE(anacrusis @ Feb 27 2011, 02:19 PM) View Post

QUOTE(DawnF @ Feb 26 2011, 08:51 PM) View Post

edit: ohmy.gif That's massive!!!! Sorry blush.gif


but utterly beautiful. No apologies needed wink.gif.


Thankyou.... and isn't it just!!

We saw the evening showing so experienced a sunset just like this one.

They are not my pictures - I pulled them from some tourist sites. It's teh Teatro Greco in Taormina, Sicily
  • 0

#39 Misti

Misti

    Virtuoso

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3099 posts
  • Member: 879
    Joined: 31-March 04

Posted 27 February 2011 - 15:10

It reminded me of the Minack Theatre in Cornwall. I love watching dance and Shakespeare productions there when a mist is rolling it. Its so atmospheric.

http://www.minack.com/

  • 0

#40 Devonclari

Devonclari

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 245 posts
  • Member: 33564
    Joined: 24-June 08
  • Sunny Devon

Posted 27 February 2011 - 19:02

Another one indifferent to opera here and while I could enjoy the spectacle of some live opera, musically it does nothing for me . I also don't like Weber very much although there will be many other clarinet players who will think this a bit strange
  • 0

#41 katica

katica

    Virtuoso

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2573 posts
  • Member: 87755
    Joined: 18-January 10
  • Central America

Posted 27 February 2011 - 20:28

QUOTE(barry-clari @ Feb 26 2011, 04:32 PM) View Post

My Poulenc views seem to put me in a minority of one laugh.gif

I have to admit I am not blown over by music from the "French School", despite their huge contribution to rescuing the oboe from the classic-romantic doldrums. I went to a concert early in the heady days when I had just realised I was completely in love with the oboe and was treated to a menu of Poulenc, Ravel, D?bussy, Dutilleux and the like. It really didn't "grab" me - though the Poulenc was more interesting than the rest. Actually, I am looking forward one day to being able to get my teeth into the Poulenc oboe sonata as playing something usually helps me appreciate it more.
  • 0

#42 Sunrise

Sunrise

    Virtuoso

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3392 posts
  • Member: 106844
    Joined: 07-June 10
  • Gibraltar

Posted 27 February 2011 - 20:49

QUOTE(corenfa @ Feb 26 2011, 02:42 PM) View Post

Anyone got any ideas for how to approach music like this? Anyone got any other similar experiences?

....

Lastly it's also occurred to me that maybe no matter how much I intellectualise about opera or Chinese traditional music, I'll never like either, the same way I keep trying booze (see the alcohol thread smile.gif ) and just don't like the taste. That would be OK too, but I feel as though I ought to think about it a bit more (music, not booze smile.gif ) before writing it off altogether.


I was the same up to last year. My mother hated opera and would turn it off everytime it came on the radio. I grew up with an inbuilt hatred of it on this basis, I loved orchestral, instrumental etc music but solo singing? Nope.

Then last year daughter started singing lessons, and came home with her first aria. Beautiful! Then a few weeks later I started lessons and came home with 5! 7 months on I am really starting to appreciate opera and Lieder too (ahh, love some of those), and will watch them happily. Still prefer the lighter Mozart operas at the moment, and I think it all comes from familiarity.

There was a series of great programs last year on BBC4, talking about opera from Monteverdi all the way through to much later. It captured our imagination, the presenter was the director of a big british opera house and had so much enthusiasm it was infectious. Maybe that is a starting point, if they are ever repeated, they are seriously worth a watch.
  • 0

#43 Dulcet

Dulcet

    Prodigy

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1309 posts
  • Member: 112579
    Joined: 06-July 10

Posted 27 February 2011 - 23:19

QUOTE(barry-clari @ Feb 26 2011, 03:56 PM) View Post

QUOTE(corenfa @ Feb 26 2011, 03:52 PM) View Post

Barry - I do love the Poulenc wind music, all of it, and I love it because it seems so emotionally ambiguous. I can never decide whether it is sad or happy, and because I think so much of life is like that, I really identify with it.


Perhaps that's part of the problem with it for me : it just comes over to me as being a bit cold and, dare I say it, directionless...

I do like Poulenc but don't think you should listen to too much at a sitting; you'd get bored with his tune... (did you see the Sacred Music series where one of the expert commentatorrs really dissed Poulenc? he did have a point!)

At a performance of Les Biches my companion said to me "I do agree with whoever said about this ballet "there's less to it than meets the eye"..."

No, i totally get why people like Poulenc.

There are some operas which I can listen to, others which I have to see.

vivaldi is not first rate.

I can leave out all music pre-1765 and not miss it unless it's Bach's B minor mass. A small amount of early baroque i can handle, but a little goes a long way.

Brass bands.

I used to dislike "operatic" singing when Iwas very young. I am not so blinkered now - there are places for many different styles of singing.

So what "ought" I to like? small scale performances of Bach. Nope, not for me. Instruments have IMPROVED over the years...
  • 0

#44 barry-clari

barry-clari

    Maestro

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 40912 posts
  • Member: 5804
    Joined: 10-January 06
  • South East London

Posted 28 February 2011 - 07:25

QUOTE(katica @ Feb 27 2011, 08:28 PM) View Post

QUOTE(barry-clari @ Feb 26 2011, 04:32 PM) View Post

My Poulenc views seem to put me in a minority of one laugh.gif

I have to admit I am not blown over by music from the "French School", despite their huge contribution to rescuing the oboe from the classic-romantic doldrums. I went to a concert early in the heady days when I had just realised I was completely in love with the oboe and was treated to a menu of Poulenc, Ravel, D?bussy, Dutilleux and the like. It really didn't "grab" me - though the Poulenc was more interesting than the rest. Actually, I am looking forward one day to being able to get my teeth into the Poulenc oboe sonata as playing something usually helps me appreciate it more.


No, for me it's just Poulenc : the rest of the French School are fine laugh.gif
  • 0

#45 karslima

karslima

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 502 posts
  • Member: 8217
    Joined: 09-November 06
  • Devon, UK

Posted 28 February 2011 - 07:36

I had a strong dislike of operatic style singing when a friend introduced me to Peter Grimes by Benjamin Britten. Even then, the first time I heard it I felt a bit disturbed, but I still recognised that were some good bits in it. I was intrigued and found that with each listening, more and more parts stuck out until it gradually started to make sense. I felt that I had the 'big picture'. Then I moved on to a stage (perhaps after listening to it about ten times) where I didn't have the big picture at all and each time I heard it there were more things to discover - the significance of one line, the depth of emotion, and of course the music.

Having discovered there were more Britten operas to enjoy I bought several box sets and was pleased to find more enjoyment - Turn of the Screw, Billy Budd, Mid Summer Nights Dream. I was excited that there was a whole musical genre to be discovered!

Then I hit the hard times. Although Monteverdi and Purcell pushed the right buttons, I couldn't take a lot of the romantic 19th century operas that are held up as the real thing. I can't say I'm particularly moved by Wagner either. Unfortunately I don't think it helps that most opera is written in foreign language which means that we lose out on the storyline and its nuances.

Anyway what I'm saying is that opera covers a wide range of musical periods, and you don't have to like all of them. I would encourage people to be open minded and not write it off as difficult.

I'm not in a position to lecture because I fail to appreciate Mozart, Schumann, Schubert, Chopin, Mahler. But especially Mozart. I'm missing something there and it's not for the lack of trying.

Another thing, although I play the violin I'm not a fan of virtuoso violin concertos, such as Bruch and Mendelssohn. They just seem to go on and on like an annoying jazz solo. Give me a good piece of orchestral music any day.
  • 0