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Looking for a trumpet


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#1 Dulcet

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 23:25

I took no 1 son out to test drive some trumpets today. He's been playing a school yamaha 2335 up till now and I wanted to have a listen to the next range up to see where the difference kicked in.

An interesting afternoon! To me, he sounded the best on Yamahas. No 2 son said, after we'd listened to a Jupiter 812, a Getzen 400 and a Blessing, that when he picked up the (latest model) Y4335 he sounded like himself. That was the instrument that was immediately responsive. Then he went back and tried all the others and the Getzen and Jupiter were playing better, and quite a nice sound, but he wasn't feeling very convinced by any of them.

Then out came the Y5335. That would be my instrument of choice - a full, sweet sound, but with that overtone of ringing, carrying quality. It would be a great orchestral instrument. Then came the Getzen Capri 590, and that's the one he fell in love with. A warmer sound than the Yamaha, but with more power than the cheaper Getzen and the Jupiter.

This was the store within striking distance with the biggest range of manufacturers in the price bracket I was interested in - does anyone have any advice to offer on anything else that might be worth a try? Slightly annoying that the Getzen is the one with very few stockists so I won't be able to find a better price, whereas I could get the Yamaha 10% cheaper elsewhere!

I THINK he's stopped saying he wants to switch to the french horn... in any case I'm not doing anything till we get the G3 results!


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#2 soccermom

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Posted 05 April 2012 - 21:29

What fun. I know nothing at all about trumpets so have no advice for you, except to check that you know about the assisted purchase scheme which could save you quite a bit if you qualify. Essentially, the County buys the instrument VAT free and then sells it to you at the same reduced price.

There seems to be a reasonably big selection here.
http://www.chamberla...asp?cat=TPINSTR

I spent some of yesterday afternoon with my daughter trying out 4 grand pianos in this shop Unfortunately, the only one we both liked is way outside my price range so we will have to widen our search. It seems to be a bit of a minefield. Definitions of "reconditioned" seem to vary widely!

Good luck with your trumpet-hunt.
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#3 Hedgehog

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Posted 05 April 2012 - 21:37

Sonny Jim had a Y 4335 for quite a long time, and still keeps it as his second trumpet. He moved up to a Bach trumpet when he was grade 7 level I think.

This shop has lots to choose from:

http://www.prozonemusic.com/
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#4 andante

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Posted 05 April 2012 - 22:31

Sadly the assisted purchase scheme depends on where you live and where your children are at school. Our local authority doesn't do it. The county couldn't help either and neither could the school (which isn't an independent, I might have had more luck if it were!). The scheme seems grossly unfair as it doesn't depend on anything sensible like parental income, and if it had been our other daughter I needed the instrument for we would have qualified, as her school is in an education authoity that does do the scheme. rolleyes.gif
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#5 sbhoa

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Posted 06 April 2012 - 12:12

QUOTE(andante @ Apr 5 2012, 11:31 PM) View Post

Sadly the assisted purchase scheme depends on where you live and where your children are at school. Our local authority doesn't do it. The county couldn't help either and neither could the school (which isn't an independent, I might have had more luck if it were!). The scheme seems grossly unfair as it doesn't depend on anything sensible like parental income, and if it had been our other daughter I needed the instrument for we would have qualified, as her school is in an education authoity that does do the scheme. rolleyes.gif

It also discriminates against pianists as you can only use if for an instrument you can carry away from school.
I wonder if carrying away with a removal van counts?
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#6 soccermom

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Posted 07 April 2012 - 22:44

I bought a violin for my daughter through the assisted purchase scheme a few years ago. I couldn't do it through the County - their rules specified that children had to be learning through them or playing in a County ensemble, neither of which my daughter did. As my daughter played in the school orchestra, they suggested I ask the school (normal primary) which I did and they were very happy to sort it out for me.

I think all state schools can do it (not sure about independents) if the instrument is to be played at school. It's a question of whether they are prepared to or not. Some presumably think it's too much trouble, or perhaps worry about buying instruments that parents might refuse to pay for.

The other disadvantage with the scheme is that it is for new instruments only. I have bought new violins - but never a new cello.
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#7 andante

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Posted 08 April 2012 - 22:34

My daughter's school is a state school, but an academy, so the funding doesn't come via the local authority, but our local authority don't run the scheme anyway, so that wouldn't have been any better. We did use it for another instrument when she was at another school in a different local authority and it was unfortunate that we didn't realise that the new school couldn't do it and buy the instrument before she changed schools.

Pupils at independent schools can use the scheme if they have lessons through the LEA music service.

The instrument does have to be portable, and has to be taken into school weekly for lessons, so sbhoa you would have to hire the van regularly for your piano lessons. laugh.gif
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#8 Bagnewauckland

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 09:59

Getzen make some of the best valve sets out there. Brilliant valves, and the instrument should last a lifetime. If/When it's time to upgrade again, a used Getzen can provide an excellent horn to the next generation of aspiring trumpet players.
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#9 Ayshah

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 11:19

QUOTE(andante @ Apr 5 2012, 11:31 PM) View Post

Sadly the assisted purchase scheme depends on where you live and where your children are at school. Our local authority doesn't do it. The county couldn't help either and neither could the school (which isn't an independent, I might have had more luck if it were!). The scheme seems grossly unfair as it doesn't depend on anything sensible like parental income, and if it had been our other daughter I needed the instrument for we would have qualified, as her school is in an education authoity that does do the scheme. rolleyes.gif

I get quite upset when I hear this as our music service bends over backward (and clearly breaks the rules) to get a child an instrument through this scheme. VAT @ 20% adds quite a bit tothe final price. When my daughter was on her Gap year and wanted to purchase a soprano sax, she did it though another student who was still at school, the parents helped and the music service were very aware that it wasnt actually for current stdent. I then purchased off her 24 hours later with a box of chocs to say thank you. At 1K we needed every bit of that 20% reduction. I dont think HMRC are going to come banging on my door demanding it back. Try contacting the Local Education Department or purchase for your other daughter.
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#10 Dulcet

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Posted 16 April 2012 - 19:34

QUOTE(Bagnewauckland @ Apr 15 2012, 10:59 AM) View Post

Getzen make some of the best valve sets out there. Brilliant valves, and the instrument should last a lifetime. If/When it's time to upgrade again, a used Getzen can provide an excellent horn to the next generation of aspiring trumpet players.


I'd heard this too; but I rather preferred the edge on the Yamaha sound...

But now he's got his G3 result of

141 !!! YAY !!!

I am a bit more generously inclined and might stop whingeing.... party1.gif
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#11 soccermom

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Posted 16 April 2012 - 20:00

QUOTE(Dulcet @ Apr 16 2012, 08:34 PM) View Post

QUOTE(Bagnewauckland @ Apr 15 2012, 10:59 AM) View Post

Getzen make some of the best valve sets out there. Brilliant valves, and the instrument should last a lifetime. If/When it's time to upgrade again, a used Getzen can provide an excellent horn to the next generation of aspiring trumpet players.


I'd heard this too; but I rather preferred the edge on the Yamaha sound...

But now he's got his G3 result of

141 !!! YAY !!!

I am a bit more generously inclined and might stop whingeing.... party1.gif


Brilliant result. Well done him!
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#12 Dulcet

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Posted 25 April 2012 - 11:40

I've talked now to 4 shops and got opinions from another few good amateur trumpeters (and by proxy another couple of pros).

It's been suggested that we try a B&S Challenger I and see what he makes of that; also I've found a 2nd hand Y6335 and a 2nd hand Getzen 700SP at good prices.
So I think (trying to minimise travel!) if we go to Phil Parker we can check out the Challenger vs the Yamaha 5335 back to back, then the following week try a new Y5335 against a secondhand 6335 at Prozone, then go back and try Y5335, new Getzen Capri and 2nd hand Getzen 700 at Dawkes.

Any advance on this as a strategy? We have been offered a 2nd hand Strad but I'm not sure he's got the power to play a pro model yet (he is v small for his age).

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#13 Dulcet

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Posted 29 April 2012 - 13:05

Yesterday we did a back to back evaluation of Challenger 1, Yamaha 5335 and Bach VBS1. Silver Plate Challenger is top of the list now! A sweet, clear tone.
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#14 peterngarnett

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Posted 08 May 2012 - 10:27

I came back to my Yamaha 232 student trumpet after a 20 year break. I was finding it rather frustrating not been able to play pieces that I used to play despite putting the practice in.
As I was enjoying playing again and had joined up with a local band, I though I would try out some new trumpets. I set about by looking on the web to see what was out there and the prices they were. I then went to my local brass shop to try them out.
On the top of my list was the 6 series Yamaha.
I tried out the top end Jupiter (series 8?), the 4 and 6 series Yamahas (the 5 had just been launched and was not available at that time) and a Stomvi Forte.
I was really supprised with the difference between all the instruments playing wise, and it was not all linked to cost.
The top end Jupiter was a really nice player, but I couldn't come to terms with it's designer looks.
The 4 series Yamaha did not suit me - I could not feel the difference between it and the standard student Yamaha.
The one I came away with was the Stomvi Forte, in a great silver finish with gold caps (not that that affects the playing). It was considerable less expensive than the Yamaha 6 series, but I just could not feel the diffence, and so justify the cost.
Stomvi was new to me, as it was not around when I started playing.
So, there's another one to give a whirl.
I have since tried out a Stad and the B&S Challenger, but would still prefer the Stomvi.
I like the way you are approaching this, by keeping to a budget, as it can be very difficult if you've played on some upper end ranges, coming back to the affordable ones.
I have since had my original Yamaha fully services (ultra-sonic cleaning and valves re-seated) and it came back feeling a lot better. I use it when playing carols outside in the winter! It may be worth considering a professional service (make sure it's a brass expert) if you buy a used trumpet from e-bay or the like.
I have since bought a Yamaha rotary valve custom trumpet (shear indulgence) which I thoroughly enjoy. It is very different in sound and feel.
Hope he lands upon one he can live with for many years to come.
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#15 Dulcet

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Posted 10 May 2012 - 12:55

QUOTE(peterngarnett @ May 8 2012, 11:27 AM) View Post

I came back to my Yamaha 232 student trumpet after a 20 year break. I was finding it rather frustrating not been able to play pieces that I used to play despite putting the practice in.
As I was enjoying playing again and had joined up with a local band, I though I would try out some new trumpets. I set about by looking on the web to see what was out there and the prices they were. I then went to my local brass shop to try them out.
On the top of my list was the 6 series Yamaha.
I tried out the top end Jupiter (series 8?), the 4 and 6 series Yamahas (the 5 had just been launched and was not available at that time) and a Stomvi Forte.
I was really supprised with the difference between all the instruments playing wise, and it was not all linked to cost.
The top end Jupiter was a really nice player, but I couldn't come to terms with it's designer looks.
The 4 series Yamaha did not suit me - I could not feel the difference between it and the standard student Yamaha.
The one I came away with was the Stomvi Forte, in a great silver finish with gold caps (not that that affects the playing). It was considerable less expensive than the Yamaha 6 series, but I just could not feel the diffence, and so justify the cost.
Stomvi was new to me, as it was not around when I started playing.
So, there's another one to give a whirl.
I have since tried out a Stad and the B&S Challenger, but would still prefer the Stomvi.
I like the way you are approaching this, by keeping to a budget, as it can be very difficult if you've played on some upper end ranges, coming back to the affordable ones.
I have since had my original Yamaha fully services (ultra-sonic cleaning and valves re-seated) and it came back feeling a lot better. I use it when playing carols outside in the winter! It may be worth considering a professional service (make sure it's a brass expert) if you buy a used trumpet from e-bay or the like.
I have since bought a Yamaha rotary valve custom trumpet (shear indulgence) which I thoroughly enjoy. It is very different in sound and feel.
Hope he lands upon one he can live with for many years to come.


Think we've finally decided - went back and tried both a brass and a silver Getzen and felt that the Challenger still had the edge. Stomvi not available within an hour's drive - we have to stop somewhere!
About to phone the shop again (think industrial action might have closed them today...)

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