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Junior Departments - information needed


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#1 Dulcet

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Posted 27 April 2012 - 15:18

A friend has just been phoned by her child's teacher to say it's time for more music and they should look at JDs. This friend is really looking for the information that isn't on the website - some "how we see it" stories and would be really really grateful for any information at all. Child is Y9 and a G6 violist and clarinettist and although they're more than capable of reading the information on the websites etc they would love to hear what it feels like to go there!

Hoping for input... oh and realistically the London conservatoires are the only option.
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#2 FullofWind

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Posted 27 April 2012 - 15:39

The expected level in Year 6 is grade 5 so unless she is far beyond grade 6 then she may find it difficult getting a place, especially on those instruments. Would a new teacher not be better if her teacher cannot take her any further?
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#3 Dulcet

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Posted 27 April 2012 - 15:44

QUOTE(FullofWind @ Apr 27 2012, 04:39 PM) View Post

The expected level in Year 6 is grade 5 so unless she is far beyond grade 6 then she may find it difficult getting a place, especially on those instruments. Would a new teacher not be better if her teacher cannot take her any further?

She's been told by one of the places she phoned (and her teacher) that she'd have a good chance - she'd be going with viola. She's only been playing viola 2 years...

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#4 muzikalbadger

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Posted 27 April 2012 - 15:48

QUOTE(Dulcet @ Apr 27 2012, 04:44 PM) View Post

QUOTE(FullofWind @ Apr 27 2012, 04:39 PM) View Post

The expected level in Year 6 is grade 5 so unless she is far beyond grade 6 then she may find it difficult getting a place, especially on those instruments. Would a new teacher not be better if her teacher cannot take her any further?

She's been told by one of the places she phoned (and her teacher) that she'd have a good chance - she'd be going with viola. She's only been playing viola 2 years...


I would agree that as a violist the JD's would snap her up!! Especially with the speed of progress she has shown smile.gif I can't talk about London conservatoires, but at the RSAMD (now RCS) the pupils I have that have gone onto the JD have loved it and come on leaps and bounds. I think what they enjoy is being part of a huge group of kids their age interested in the same stuff!! They get theory classes, musicianship classes, choirs, orchestras, smaller ensembles and obviously individual tuition at the RCS and I think they sometimes realise how much other stuff is involved in learning an instrument other than just the notes!
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#5 Ayshah

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Posted 27 April 2012 - 16:08

There has been much written here on the subject of JDs over the years. If you use the "Search" button it will help you find the many previous topics. smile.gif
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#6 miffy

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Posted 29 April 2012 - 15:13

I think the auditions for September have just finished but there are open days throughout the year. Also you can book consultation lessons which may be helpful for an idea of standard and teaching styles.
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#7 Dulcet

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Posted 30 April 2012 - 08:32

Thank you all. Have searched past threads and forwarded the info!

Incidentally, the child of a colleague of mine just won the local music festival's "champion of champions" (if you see what I mean) prize. The adjudicator was staggered that he was going to university not conservatoire (and not to read music). This child didn't do JDs, or audition for NCO/NYO or other national ensembles, just local teaching and county ensembles and supportive musical parents. I believe one of the siblings is at conservatoire. Maybe this just showed that he didn't want such an unstable career and wanted to keep music as the respite from work? Who knows!
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#8 ansatz496

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Posted 30 April 2012 - 12:33

QUOTE(Dulcet @ Apr 30 2012, 04:32 AM) View Post

Incidentally, the child of a colleague of mine just won the local music festival's "champion of champions" (if you see what I mean) prize. The adjudicator was staggered that he was going to university not conservatoire (and not to read music). This child didn't do JDs, or audition for NCO/NYO or other national ensembles, just local teaching and county ensembles and supportive musical parents. I believe one of the siblings is at conservatoire. Maybe this just showed that he didn't want such an unstable career and wanted to keep music as the respite from work? Who knows!


My university is practically crawling with people who were good enough to become professional but decided to go for something more practical laugh.gif However, most of them did invest significant time and money into things like JD's, summer programs, high quality instruments, etc. - it seems like a bit of a waste, but I think many of them were still considering careers in music right up until the point of university and wanted to keep their options open. There are also a few who are still planning to pursue professional careers in music and are planning on getting post-graduate degrees in musical performance, but didn't want to go the conservatoire route for undergrad because they wanted a broader education.
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#9 notmusimum

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Posted 30 April 2012 - 15:08

QUOTE(miffy @ Apr 29 2012, 04:13 PM) View Post

I think the auditions for September have just finished but there are open days throughout the year. Also you can book consultation lessons which may be helpful for an idea of standard and teaching styles.



I'd really support doing this before you go to JD. You may not always get what you want or expect ohmy.gif
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#10 Minstrel

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Posted 30 April 2012 - 15:19

There is nothing 'wasted' in broadening your education by becoming very involved with music. Everyone should follow their dream , and if that dream is to be, say, a doctor saving lives AND earning enough money to be able to afford the comfortable things in life - including, for example, a better instrument than many professional musicians can afford and the freedom to play as much or as little as you want to - then you should follow your dream and not feel guilty about not choosing music as a profession (ie main money-earner).
It can come full circle too - there are several instrumental coaches on the NYO staff who studied things other than music at university, to take just one example.
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#11 Kate

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Posted 03 May 2012 - 11:35

Hi Dulcet,

If you'd like any info please just PM me! smile.gif I was at a JD from 2003 to 2007!

Kate
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