Jump to content


Photo

Singing repertoire for girls aged 10-16


  • Please log in to reply
10 replies to this topic

#1 CariLaythorpe

CariLaythorpe

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 27 posts
  • Member: 307928
    Joined: 30-August 11
  • Southampton, UK

Posted 01 October 2012 - 18:46

Hi all

Basically - I'm fed up of sticking on YouTube for all of my girl singers and doing 'karaoke lessons'.

I'm encouraging more sheet music based work, and I'm trying to steer the lessons that way. It's better for me too. So I've introduced some musical theatre - Popular and I Can Hear The Bells go down well. For pop songs I'm using Dream A Little Dream Of Me and White Flag.

Is there anything else anyone can recommend. These songs are going to run out quickly!

I think Rockschool and Trinity repertoire lists are rubbish and I don't want to refer to them. ABRSM lists are out-dated and too classical.

Cheers for your help (and for reading my grumble!)

Cari
smile.gif

  • 0

#2 Splog

Splog

    Prodigy

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1940 posts
  • Member: 460379
    Joined: 20-May 12

Posted 01 October 2012 - 21:22

I know it's a dreadful programme, but have you tried Glee? Many of the old songs making a comeback - I've got one of mine singing "Smile, though your heart is breaking".

On the subject of Trinity, I know you don't like the repertoire, but I have recently discovered a series called Sing Musical Theatre. Four books, including CDs, background and performance notes, plus singing tips and exercises to go with each song. Contains I can hear the bells, and Legally Blonde among others.

Many of my singers in that age range also enjoy singing folk songs. And they still like Disney until about age 13. Do you have access to SingUp? Some stuff on there may appeal, but there is more for younger children.

Rather than youtube, have you considered getting a download of the pop songs they like? Then you could have the sheet music, in a suitable key, which you could play for them.

Pop songs I have used successfully recently include Make you feel my love, Cannonball, Who do you think you are, I'm a believer. Don't forget the jazz standards either.

Hope that is of some use. smile.gif
  • 0

#3 BitterSweet

BitterSweet

    Virtuoso

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2050 posts
  • Member: 37220
    Joined: 13-August 08
  • Edinburgh, Scotland

Posted 02 October 2012 - 08:26

Since you're talking about musicals, LCM offer exams in Music Theatre Performance which include costume and movement as part of the requirements, which might be attractive.

Even if not for the exams, Hal Leonard's 'The Singer's Music Theatre Anthology' series have a HUGE range of different styles of music theatre songs, and all of them come with CDs with backing tracks. They are up to five volumes for each voice (Sop/Mezzo-Alto/Tenor/Bass) and you can get at least the first three of each easily in the UK.

More and more sheet music books come with CDs and there's also www.pianotracksformusicals.com and the sister sites which offer backing tracks for a wide range of genres. They'll even do them on request for a higher fee.
  • 0

#4 ExpressYourself

ExpressYourself

    Prodigy

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1425 posts
  • Member: 113829
    Joined: 14-July 10

Posted 02 October 2012 - 09:55

QUOTE(Splog @ Oct 1 2012, 10:22 PM)  

On the subject of Trinity, I know you don't like the repertoire, but I have recently discovered a series called Sing Musical Theatre. Four books, including CDs, background and performance notes, plus singing tips and exercises to go with each song. Contains I can hear the bells, and Legally Blonde among others.


Ooh, I hadn't heard of that series. Not sure my students are into Musical Theatre but I'm always after good ideas for exercises and tips. Are they worth the money if you're not too interested in the sheet music?
  • 0

#5 ExpressYourself

ExpressYourself

    Prodigy

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1425 posts
  • Member: 113829
    Joined: 14-July 10

Posted 02 October 2012 - 10:10

As for good songs to sing. You can't really sing pop songs from sheet music. It's not the sheet music which represents the song, it's the recorded version. As anyone who buys easy play piano pop songs will testify.

So instead of thinking youtube is dreadful, embrace it! I print lyric sheets onto paper so we can make notes. Sometimes I use the youtube backing tracks but sometimes I buy the mp3 so we can change the key. Sometimes I download the chords from ultimate guitar.

I wonder how others who teach pop do it?

In a separate exercise I teach them how to read music, but it doesn't often cross over into repertoire.

Some good songs are

Anything that's been in Glee!
Firefly - Owl City
Missing You - The Saturdays
Pixie Lott (really good, often small vocal range) - I like Jack, Mamma Do, All about tonight, Boys and Girls
Your Song - Ellie Goulding/Elton John
Make you feel my love - Adele/Bob
Chasing Cars - Snow Patrol
Take A Bow - Rihanna
White Flag - Dido
I'll stand by you - Girls Aloud/Pretenders
The One That Got Away - Katy Perry
Clocks or Yellow - Coldplay
Call me maybe - Carly Ray Jepson
Lego House - Ed Sheeran
Forget you - Cee lo Green
Marry You or Just the way you are - Bruno Mars
That's what makes you beautiful - One Direction
Price Tag - Jessie J

There's just a few I've been doing with my beginners this term.
  • 0

#6 Dugazon

Dugazon

    Virtuoso

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2283 posts
  • Member: 9044
    Joined: 14-January 07

Posted 02 October 2012 - 10:30

Agree with ExpressYourself. The only reason I sometimes use sheet music with Pop or Rock is to train sight reading, but apart from that, I find it hideous. It's the recorded version that was there first, and anything written down is just an approximation (often not a good one) of what the original artist does.

It makes absolutely no difference to me what age group they're in if they want to sing Pop, apart from having to transpose to suit their developing voices. That's why I find it nigh on impossible to suggest a song list or sheet music volume.

If I could mention one I use with some of my female singers, it's the the "All Woman" series (comes with CDs), because it comes in a variety of contemporary styles like Jazz, Blues, Singer/Songwriter, R'n'B and so on. It still means though that you only use them as a rough idea, and very often, we move away from the notation, change key, do different embellishments and so on.

I use Youtube a lot, and there are so many things you can train whilst working on Pop - improvisation for instance, which, in my opinion, students can't learn early enough (and it's sometimes sorely neglected). I sometimes do a chord reduction myself, although you can pull virtually everything from the net these days (ExpressYourself already mentioned Ultimate Guitar), and then we practise improvisation over a certain chord sequence that's already related to the song.

I also use Tune Transformer on my iPad, changes pitch an speed of any playback to your liking.

In short: Teaching Pop requires a completely different approach to teaching classical, or even MT. It also requires, imho, a bit more prep work with regards to sighting repertoire and making it a good fit, although a lot of people probably wouldn't believe this wink.gif
  • 0

#7 BitterSweet

BitterSweet

    Virtuoso

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2050 posts
  • Member: 37220
    Joined: 13-August 08
  • Edinburgh, Scotland

Posted 02 October 2012 - 10:32

QUOTE(Splog @ Oct 1 2012, 10:22 PM)  

On the subject of Trinity, I know you don't like the repertoire, but I have recently discovered a series called Sing Musical Theatre. Four books, including CDs, background and performance notes, plus singing tips and exercises to go with each song. Contains I can hear the bells, and Legally Blonde among others.


Have ordered one of these to look at. Seems a good choice for beginners working on musical theatre stuff and something sensible to point students/parents too to buy as music theatre sheet music is either giant collections, vocal scores/selections or endless downloads and prints which are easy to lose or destroy! Excited to see what the notes and exercises are like.
  • 0

#8 Splog

Splog

    Prodigy

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1940 posts
  • Member: 460379
    Joined: 20-May 12

Posted 02 October 2012 - 12:47

QUOTE(BitterSweet @ Oct 2 2012, 11:32 AM)  

QUOTE(Splog @ Oct 1 2012, 10:22 PM)  

On the subject of Trinity, I know you don't like the repertoire, but I have recently discovered a series called Sing Musical Theatre. Four books, including CDs, background and performance notes, plus singing tips and exercises to go with each song. Contains I can hear the bells, and Legally Blonde among others.


Have ordered one of these to look at. Seems a good choice for beginners working on musical theatre stuff and something sensible to point students/parents too to buy as music theatre sheet music is either giant collections, vocal scores/selections or endless downloads and prints which are easy to lose or destroy! Excited to see what the notes and exercises are like.


I picked one up in the library the other day, and have ordered another one from them. So I actually don't know what they cost to buy. Fairly new publication, from 2011. The songs are from the Trinity exam repertoire, and are graded, so the one I have has some grades 4 and 5 songs (different from ABRSM). Haven't studied it in great depth, so can't say yet how good the singing tips are, but I wouldn't have thought there is enough in it to buy for these alone. (Possibly nothing in there you don't already know how to do, but interesting to see it in the context of a particular song.) I am also interested to see one at a different level to see if the singing tips are different for the different grades. The background and performance notes are excellent though.


I tend to use my guitar to accompany pop songs, if the students don't have a backing track.

  • 0

#9 soccermom

soccermom

    Prodigy

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1161 posts
  • Member: 9005
    Joined: 12-January 07

Posted 06 October 2012 - 22:16

QUOTE(Splog @ Oct 1 2012, 10:22 PM)  

And they still like Disney until about age 13.


My 15 yr old's favourite musical activity is accompanying herself singing Disney songs!
  • 0

#10 GMc

GMc

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 690 posts
  • Member: 322722
    Joined: 27-September 11

Posted 31 October 2012 - 22:29

Mine is 13 and also loves Disney to her own accompaniment. Scales and Arpeggios is her number one, then Everybody wants to be a Cat. Never Smile at a Crocodile and all the Mary Poppins have not lost their appeal either. Sylvia Woods does some great books of harp arrangements of Disney, Lloyd Webber, John Denver (Annie's Song...), Romantic Songs (very tame, non #### ones) 60s hits (Puff the Magic Dragon, Simon and Garfunkel...),Irish and Scottish stuff - you can use them as piano or harp plus voice. She likes all those.

School has a penchant for musical theatre numbers - I am not all that sure about 10-14 year olds doing love stuff from Wicked, Miss Saigon, For Good, At the Beginning, the one about the girl falling for the boy at the coffee shop.....Always makes me cringe somewhat. Especially with backing tapes, make up and mikes. Not cringemaking as middle school choir doing Michael Jacksons You turn me on though (odd choice for a catholic school....went downhill when they ran out of nuns perhaps).

If you want a challenge - try teaching German and Vergebliches Standchen. At least its modest flirting and the girl comes out the boss and the lad with his tail between his legs! Mine thought it was really funny and liked doing the characters.


  • 0

#11 BitterSweet

BitterSweet

    Virtuoso

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2050 posts
  • Member: 37220
    Joined: 13-August 08
  • Edinburgh, Scotland

Posted 01 November 2012 - 12:00

QUOTE(GMc @ Oct 31 2012, 10:29 PM)  

...the one about the girl falling for the boy at the coffee shop...


Taylor the Latte Boy. If you do have a student who wants to sing this, please make sure they see the rebuttal. It puts it all into perspective.

Nothing wrong with Wicked, but it isn't easy music.

QUOTE
...Vergebliches Standchen...


Ugh, I hated that song when I did it for Grade 5 at about 15 or 16... Personal taste though.

However, that has made me think of another point. If you want to branch out into foreign languages, it's good to know what the school teaches. German was at one point being edged out in favour of Spanish, for example. Build on what the students know, even if French is a little tricker to sing in. If you get someone conscientious, or who likes learning languages, this might be a way to get them to explore repertoire away from the 'pop' style.
  • 0