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"...but why don't they ever smile?!"


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#16 elemimele

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 21:24

... oh, and Oboists, I love your sound and instrument, and admire you for enduring the aphid-stylet look. If it's any consolation, when I see a bassoonist leaning slightly forwards as he plays, I half expect coloured ping-pong balls to emerge in a fountain from the top of his instrument. I should give up music. I just can't look an orchestra in the eye.


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#17 Arundodonuts

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 21:54

Great. I'll never look at a bassoon the same way again.

 

But music doesn't make you laugh? Ever?


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#18 elemimele

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 22:36

Things like the famous Pagagnini Pachelbel canon version  make me laugh, but I class that as a musical comedy sketch rather than music as such. I don't want to get all pretentious, but honestly music seems to me to operate in a different emotional playing-field. It can make me truly, innerly happy in a way that a comedy sketch never could (though a really good author can). It can touch the heart. But to laugh, I need something that is either more visual, or more arranged around a verbal plot. I need words. Music can very easily make me cry.

 

Comedy often relies on surprise (and surprises in music are rarely satisfying). Or it relies on lateral thinking: the situation may not be surprising, but as it heads inevitably towards some catastrophe, you're thinking "no, surely it won't..." but it does. There aren't really that many situations where music do this.

 

Maybe I'm just not a musical person? Though I do feel that different arts appeal in different ways. For example, a picture is a moment frozen in time, and although the artist might like to feel that his picture tells a story, it is all in the imagination, and there is no time-line. A novel always has a time-line. Music has a time-line, but no pictures (unless the listener wants to add them).


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#19 Cyrilla

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 22:41

Not orchestral - but I can't help smiling when I watch Home Free...

 

:wub:


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#20 SingingPython

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 23:48

I'd tell youngsters to look at players' faces when they've just finished playing the piece.  I'm pretty sure I often break out into a smile at the end of concerts / big performances (violinist) - agree that before that I'm often too focussed.

 

I recall playing Peter and the Wolf as a teenager in youth orchestra.  In rehearsals we had a problem with the horns - they couldn't play their wolf theme without getting the giggles.  Doesn't work well down the french horn!


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#21 kenm

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Posted 21 March 2017 - 09:45

....

I recall playing Peter and the Wolf as a teenager in youth orchestra.  In rehearsals we had a problem with the horns - they couldn't play their wolf theme without getting the giggles.  Doesn't work well down the french horn!

I once came upon three trumpeters, trying to play a rather good arrangement of Mendelssohn's "Scherzo Capriccioso", but "corpsing" whenever they looked at each other.  They overcame the problem by staying at the corners of a triangle but facing outward instead of inward.


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#22 elemimele

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Posted 21 March 2017 - 23:22

Here is my current favourite pianist demonstrating that in the right environment (the Old-time Piano Playing championships, IL, US), a bit of showmanship certainly goes down a treat. This is a man who can combine stratospheric talent (and beautiful playing) with a whole gamut of grins.


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#23 Ligneo Fistula

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Posted 22 March 2017 - 06:37

TBH, rather than smiling/grinning I think the little tykes were commenting on just how very earnest/miserable & rigid they thought the players looked. and disconnected from their audience, cf. the other performance arts they've engaged with.


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