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16th notes piano.


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#16 Hildegard

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 17:29

 


Please explain how it is counted in the UK as I'm there! Thanks.

 

 

The group is really too fast for counting, but you could think of four repetitions of it (i.e. one bar of 4/4 time) as sounding like:

da dum   da  da dum  da  da dum   da  da dum   da


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#17 linda.ff

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Posted 24 April 2017 - 09:42

 

 

 

I would then count the measure as "1 e (and) a 2 (e) and a" the notes at the bracketed of course absent. I think that's how to count semiquavers.

 
It isn't how they are counted in the UK, and this is a UK based forum which means that people will be using UK approaches and terminology.  The UK and US use different languages for musical notation, and I think this is causing some confusion for you.

Please explain how it is counted in the UK as I'm there! Thanks.

 

There are probably several ways.

The similar way to yours that I might count 16th notes is 1 er and a  (1 and would be counting 8th notes).

 

Yes, essentially the same method except - surely 1-e-&-a is easier to say (unless of course you're sounding the r in er) and if you have that semiquaver-quaver-semiquaver pattern you end up with 1-e®---a rather than 1-e---a. The first would need a glottal stop and somehow stutter, surely?

 

Flossie, how do you think it's counted in the UK, then, if 1-e-&-a is not British?


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#18 Happyhacker

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Posted 24 April 2017 - 10:40

As a beginner at piano I have to break measures up carefully and can think of more ways of vocalising the rhythm. Especially if one want to emphasise the notes that are there. Like la-Laa-la-la, etc. and even following the song trying to sing the notes. My question arose as I am trying to play "I will survive" which has various combinations of 16ths and 8ths. I think the suggested method above is "standard" for the UK but la and da I find often easier when combining singing the melody as well. Oh well keep practicing and I'll eventually get over that steep curve and then have time to pacify the wife!
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#19 sbhoa

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Posted 24 April 2017 - 17:22

As a beginner at piano I have to break measures up carefully and can think of more ways of vocalising the rhythm. Especially if one want to emphasise the notes that are there. Like la-Laa-la-la, etc. and even following the song trying to sing the notes. My question arose as I am trying to play "I will survive" which has various combinations of 16ths and 8ths. I think the suggested method above is "standard" for the UK but la and da I find often easier when combining singing the melody as well. Oh well keep practicing and I'll eventually get over that steep curve and then have time to pacify the wife!

With something like that I wouldn't worry too much about working out tricky rhythms if it's a song you know well. Use the score to help with the notes and play it as you know it.


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