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Piano Lessons


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Poll: How much do you pay per hour for your lesson? (76 member(s) have cast votes)

How much do you pay per hour for your lesson?

  1. £10 - £15 (23 votes [30.26%])

    Percentage of vote: 30.26%

  2. £15 - £20 (19 votes [25.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 25.00%

  3. £20 - £25 (21 votes [27.63%])

    Percentage of vote: 27.63%

  4. £25 - £30 (7 votes [9.21%])

    Percentage of vote: 9.21%

  5. Over £30 (6 votes [7.89%])

    Percentage of vote: 7.89%

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#1 Guest: Lisa87_*

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Posted 09 July 2005 - 21:17

I was just interested to know how much everyone pays for their piano lessons as when I have taken my grade 8 I want to be able to teach privately & don't really know what the average rate is per hour. If you only have half an hour then just double the amount you pay (sounds pretty obvious but thought I would just say it!).

I pay £25 for an hour once a week. It used to be £10 but it went up. I don't mind though as I get on really well with my piano teacher & don't think I could find anyone better. I clicked with her straight away & have had her for 6 years now. I think it's important for a student to feel totally comfortable with their teacher so I think it's worth the money if you find someone you really click with providing you can afford it of course.

Lisa xxx

P.S. I didn't put an option for anything under £10 as I doubted anyone would charge any lower than that.
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#2 Guest: Car Expert_*

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Posted 09 July 2005 - 21:56

I can't really vote in this poll because my piano lessons are only half an hour long. My lessons are £10 every week, though.
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#3 Guest: Lisa87_*

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Posted 09 July 2005 - 22:47

I'm sorry I should have put, 'how much do you spend a week on piano lessons?' I did write in my post though that if you only had half an hour then you could just double your amount.

I wish I could change it now but I don't think I can dry.gif

Lisa xxx
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#4 Guest: unmusicalmum_*

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Posted 09 July 2005 - 22:52

I expect more people than you might imagine pay less than £10/hour due to school subsidies, music awards and some less experienced teachers who don't charge so much. I pay £8.30 per hour (£4.15 per week) for sons private lessons (but teacher only teaches up to grade 4). Next term he will move to free school lessons instead (music award); I hope he gets on as well with the new teacher as the old. The school lessons are around £30/hour (£15 per week) if you pay.

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#5 Guest: Lisa87_*

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Posted 09 July 2005 - 23:22

QUOTE(unmusicalmum @ Jul 9 2005, 10:52 PM)
I expect more people than you might imagine pay less than £10/hour due to school subsidies, music awards and some less experienced teachers who don't charge so much.  I pay £8.30 per hour (£4.15 per week) for sons private lessons (but teacher only teaches up to grade 4).  Next term he will move to free school lessons instead (music award); I hope he gets on as well with the new teacher as the old.  The school lessons are around £30/hour (£15 per week) if you pay.

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Wow, I didn't really think that anyone would charge less than £10 per hour but I was obviously wrong! Even though your son's teacher only teaches up to grade 4 that is still excellent value! I thought you had to have grade 8 to teach privately so I didn't realise there would be less experienced teachers out there but at least I know that I can teach before I take my grade 8 now smile.gif How does your son get free school lessons? I've never heard of music awards before. I wish I'd been able to have free school lessons when I was at school as I went without a teacher for a year because the lessons there were too expensive & I couldn't find a suitable private teacher.

Lisa xxx
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#6 Guest: jpiano_*

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Posted 10 July 2005 - 10:06

QUOTE(Lisa87 @ Jul 9 2005, 11:22 PM)
Wow, I didn't really think that anyone would charge less than £10 per hour but I was obviously wrong! Even though your son's teacher only teaches up to grade 4 that is still excellent value! I thought you had to have grade 8 to teach privately so I didn't realise there would be less experienced teachers out there but at least I know that I can teach before I take my grade 8 now smile.gif How does your son get free school lessons? I've never heard of music awards before. I wish I'd been able to have free school lessons when I was at school as I went without a teacher for a year because the lessons there were too expensive & I couldn't find a suitable private teacher.

Lisa xxx

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In my experience it depends on the schools- in one school I've taught at, everyone doing GCSE music got free instrumental lessons. It gave a great opportunity to people who otherwise would never have learnt. In another school they have to pay the full amount for lessons.

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#7 Guest: saxlover_*

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Posted 10 July 2005 - 10:12

QUOTE(jpiano @ Jul 10 2005, 11:06 AM)
QUOTE(Lisa87 @ Jul 9 2005, 11:22 PM)
Wow, I didn't really think that anyone would charge less than £10 per hour but I was obviously wrong! Even though your son's teacher only teaches up to grade 4 that is still excellent value! I thought you had to have grade 8 to teach privately so I didn't realise there would be less experienced teachers out there but at least I know that I can teach before I take my grade 8 now smile.gif How does your son get free school lessons? I've never heard of music awards before. I wish I'd been able to have free school lessons when I was at school as I went without a teacher for a year because the lessons there were too expensive & I couldn't find a suitable private teacher.

Lisa xxx

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In my experience it depends on the schools- in one school I've taught at, everyone doing GCSE music got free instrumental lessons. It gave a great opportunity to people who otherwise would never have learnt. In another school they have to pay the full amount for lessons.

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All those learning piano at my school have 'free' lessons. Well they pay £4 a term ish I think so they are basically free! They only pay to use the actual instrument in case it needs tuning or repairing etc

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#8 Guest: unmusicalmum_*

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Posted 10 July 2005 - 10:44

Fairly sure sons teacher only went as far as grade 6 herself, so you don't need to have grade 8, though I'm sure some would argue that you should. It is excellent value; I strongly suspect that she is one of those people who doesn't like to put her charges up and has been teaching so long that her rates are now lower than they should be. She has also told me that she does it more for love than money. She is a lovely lady who has really fostered sons love of music (we kind of expected that it would be something he did for a year or two and then gave up, but instead after a year or two he decided he wanted to learn cello as well. Cello rapidly became his first instrument, but he tends to practise more on piano. The school music award is at a private school, so arguably it is subsidised by the fees. Each year they run music auditions for the new intake and usually award 1 or 2 scholarships (which give free lessons and discounted fees) and around half a dozen bursaries which give free lessons on a specified instrument. Son was aiming for a cello bursary, knowing that there were several candidates aroung grade 6/7 standard (at age 11!) who were sure to get the scholarships. Surprisingly, he was awarded a piano bursary as well, which was most welcome. I think a lot of private schools run similar schemes; not sure if any such things exist in state schools - rarely I suspect.
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#9 Guest: violinandpianogurl_*

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Posted 10 July 2005 - 10:47

it's £18 for me and my sister to have half an hour each. I think we get a sort of special offer because we're sisters.
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#10 Guest: SuzyMac_*

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Posted 10 July 2005 - 12:39

The cost of lessons is also very dependent on where you live. I live near Birmingham and you won't find many teachers charging over £15-20 per hour here, and theat's the experienced ones. However, go 10miles down the road and the cost will nearly double.

Lisa87 - look around at how much other teachers in your area charge, and then charge less as you will start off with very little experience.

As a teacher I charge £10 an hour, but may increase in September. My piano teacher charges £16 per hour, but has a lot more experience than me.
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#11 Guest: Dangermouse_*

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Posted 10 July 2005 - 12:57

I live in Belfast and charge £25 /hr for piano and organ tuition.
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#12 Guest: Tess_*

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Posted 10 July 2005 - 13:05

How much do you think half an hour per week piano lesson in London should cost, folks? Thanks!
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#13 Guest: maggiemay_*

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Posted 10 July 2005 - 13:45

QUOTE(Tess @ Jul 10 2005, 01:05 PM)
How much do you think half an hour per week piano lesson in London should cost, folks? Thanks!

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It's going to depend on experience and qualifications.
I'm on the edge of London (central is likely to be more) and I charge the same as Dangermouse. Doesn't vary with grade or subject.
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#14 Guest: oboist_*

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Posted 10 July 2005 - 20:49

Where I live the rates vary enormously. Our music services are more expensive than many of our private teachers but parents still use them because the children get lessons in school, which means less demands on time after it. Parents pay pretty much the full costs.

On average, private teachers around here are charging £20-25/hour and getting it, with many having extensive waiting lists (myself included). Most of my pupils take half hour lesson slots or 45 minutes. I only have a handful who like the full hour and they are mostly Grade 7+ pupils.

That said, you can still find inexperienced teachers who charge half that. ISM rates can be a useful guideline but, in the end, you can only charge what your local market will accept and what you think you're worth. If you can make the two match up, you've got the right price.

I did hear the other day of a college professor teaching in London who asks in excess of £60 per hour and has a full list of advanced pupils. Wow!

Don't think I'd get very far if I started charging even half that round here. smile.gif

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#15 Guest: sl123451_*

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Posted 10 July 2005 - 21:46

£34 for 1 hour.
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