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Despair with lack of practise from pupils


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#16 Doodle

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Posted 13 February 2019 - 20:25

Here's another one contemplating jumping the sinking ship, cel.....

BPx

I jumped last summer!  Couldn't be happier :)  Teach from home only, see all parents every week, no forgotten music books and everything is SO much better.

 

Go on - jump!

x


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#17 Gran'piano

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Posted 13 February 2019 - 20:51

This is not my field of work, but much of what Aquarelle says strikes chords of agreement in my world too. Beautifully put.
Once when one of 'my' children said that he had had no time to practice all the week, I mentioned a very popular TV programme and the lad promptly said how 'smashing' it had been. I then said innocently, 'I thought you had had no free time. I didn't see the programme as I really didn't have any'. I don't think it made a lot of difference to his practicing regularly, but it made him think more carefully when giving excuses.
If a mother asked when her child could take the next exam when she wasn't making much progress and I was pretty certain she didn't work at her music other than at the lesson, I might ask how her playing sounds at home when she practices. Does the mother have the feeling she is progressing well? Could they perhaps record her playing one of her pieces so that I could hear how it sounds in a different environment.
Normally I would think it to be the youngster's responsibility to practice, but if a mother starts pushing, I would play the ball right back in her court.
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#18 hammer action

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Posted 14 February 2019 - 13:27

If a mother asked when her child could take the next exam when she wasn't making much progress and I was pretty certain she didn't work at her music other than at the lesson, I might ask how her playing sounds at home when she practices. Does the mother have the feeling she is progressing well? Could they perhaps record her playing one of her pieces so that I could hear how it sounds in a different environment.
Normally I would think it to be the youngster's responsibility to practice, but if a mother starts pushing, I would play the ball right back in her court.

 

I absolutely love this idea! 


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#19 SheWhoDaresGins

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Posted 14 February 2019 - 22:19

There is, no doubt, a quite shocking (to me) sense of entitlement and laziness amongst parents - that is not limited to music practise but extends, as others have said, into all areas of learning.

I work in a school and I have children who learn music.

I am constantly lost for words when parents are relieved it’s a half term so that children won’t have to practise, who never encourage or help or involve themselves in any way with any sort of home-learning.

For most children the early, tentative steps towards improvement are simply practise followed by encouragement. Yet it seems to be a mystery to some parents that the more my kids practise, the better they get! I’ve had parent-friends express astonishment at the ‘rate’ of their improvement and equally they are flabbergasted that my children are asked to find a minimum of 10 mins every day. Hardly cracking the whip.

I am really saddened to hear of your experiences as music teachers.

What a wonderous, life-long gift, music can be. I will never understand parents who think that a musical education for their children, ends with writing a cheque.
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#20 ma non troppo

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Posted 15 February 2019 - 00:18

I think that as teachers our job is often to educate the parents as well. With some I genuinely despair. There definitely has been a very big change in parenting style over the past couple of decades and many parents seem to increasingly be worried about being "friends" to their children rather than stepping up to the plate and parenting. Being a friend is not the same as being a parent. What a long term disservice these adults are doing to their children. Yes, you don't need to be a stern Victorian parent, but the pendulum has swung too far the other way.
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#21 jenny

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Posted 15 February 2019 - 09:48

This thread makes me realize how lucky I am! All of my young pupils' parents are really interested and involved in their children's practice and progress. Most of them sit in on the lessons regularly and some come in just occasionally. I wrote a few days ago on another thread about inviting the father of 2 boys in to observe a lesson, as he had never done so and we had only discussed things by text message. He is keen for them to take their first piano exams this year and I wanted him to see what is involved and what we've been doing in the lessons. He told me afterwards that he could see that they weren't practising enough or - more importantly - practising in the right way. They are a lovely family and the parents are very supportive. I'm sure that teaching in a school means that there is probably very little contact with parents and that must be very difficult. I'm glad I teach at home!        


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#22 Bantock

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Posted 16 February 2019 - 18:06

It's unfortunate that the wrong spelling of 'practise/practice' has been used in the title of this thread and then has been incorrectly used a number of times in the original post and subsequent contributions. A teacher, particularly when working in schools and then most probably using the word in report writing or emails to parents, should get it right.

I now fully expect a completely hysterical reaction to my mild observation, as happened the last time someone had the temerity to mention something similar.
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#23 Latin pianist

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Posted 16 February 2019 - 18:47

I agree about using s in the verb and c in the noun, but I remember a thread on here where someone said that the Americans used practice as the verb and as lots of teachers use American tutor books, it was ok.
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#24 jenny

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Posted 16 February 2019 - 21:00

It's unfortunate that the wrong spelling of 'practise/practice' has been used in the title of this thread and then has been incorrectly used a number of times in the original post and subsequent contributions. A teacher, particularly when working in schools and then most probably using the word in report writing or emails to parents, should get it right.

I now fully expect a completely hysterical reaction to my mild observation, as happened the last time someone had the temerity to mention something similar.

 

I think most of us are aware of this, but it has been mentioned before and maybe we think the topics are more important than spelling. Having said that, my family members are very aware of how I feel about grammar and spelling - one of my sons once mentioned that he's always really careful when he texts me!! smile.png


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#25 ma non troppo

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Posted 16 February 2019 - 21:34

I agree that the title of the thread is wrong, but the substance is more important. It is easy to make mistakes. I realised recently that I had been spelling "the verb to pedal" incorrectly for years. For some reason I had been using a double "L"

Off topic slightly... but I can't remember what Bantock's beef (nice alliteration I feel ;) ) with this forum is, but if it is to do with a lack of moderation I feel their pain.
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#26 zwhe

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Posted 16 February 2019 - 22:00

It's unfortunate that the wrong spelling of 'practise/practice' has been used in the title of this thread and then has been incorrectly used a number of times in the original post and subsequent contributions. A teacher, particularly when working in schools and then most probably using the word in report writing or emails to parents, should get it right.

I now fully expect a completely hysterical reaction to my mild observation, as happened the last time someone had the temerity to mention something similar.

Here is my 'hysterical' response. This is not a communication with parents, and as such I doubt if any of us proof-read our posts in the same way we would for a school report. Surely this forum is here to support each other with the issue raised, not to jump on people because they have made a spelling or grammar mistake, or actually have a disability such as dyslexia. In terms of moderation, surely all of these posts (including mine!) are actually breaking the forum rules as they are definitely off-topic.


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#27 hammer action

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Posted 19 February 2019 - 11:11

So, the correct spelling is with a 'c' and not an 's'?  Hmmmm, I've just sent an email off to a student's father a few minutes ago spelling it 'practise'.  I've written it that way for years.  'Tonguing' is another one I can't seem to get right unless on a laptop with autocorrect.


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#28 mel2

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Posted 19 February 2019 - 11:28

I'm never sure about it either; I know when used as a verb it should be an 's' and a noun should have the 'c' version -my problem is understanding when the verb 'to practise' becomes a noun e.g the pupil's regular practise/practice.
To me, someone's practice might be their chiropody business or their peculiar habits!

*what did they teach me in school? Evidently, not much!*
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#29 Sylvette

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Posted 19 February 2019 - 15:22

The easy one to remember is advise and advice.  They follow the same rules but because they are pronounced differently they are easier to distinguish.


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#30 SheWhoDaresGins

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Posted 21 February 2019 - 16:31

If the word practice is considered to be the noun in a sentence - eg: a dental practice or music practice room - then I think it’s a C

If the word is a verb; Jocasta refuses to practise her harp, then I think it’s an S.

It’s a tricky one!

I only found out a couple of months ago that there are two different words: complementary and complimentary - whoops!
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