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skipping flute exercises


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#1 adultpianist

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Posted 20 January 2018 - 22:46

I am a beginner with flute..  I have a book of exercises.   I have been starting from the beginning.   I am up to module 5.   Module 5 starts talking about ties and teaches you how to recognise and play a tie.   I am not prepared to do this module because I find it boring because I already know how to recognise and play a tie from my piano studies.  I use basic exercises to practice breathing and changing my fingers on the pads of the flute from one note to the other and that is all. I do not also need to learn about ties and time signature


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#2 EllieD

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Posted 21 January 2018 - 08:50

But of course, anyone who has already learned one instrument is bound to find overlap when they learn another. One of the piano sight reading books I have is explaining about dotted rhythms - this is good for most Grade 2 pianists who are learning an instrument for the first time but obviously I don't need that myself at my stage, so it's all good and I just do the sight reading exercises.

 

Are you worried about missing out a section that you don't need?


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#3 adultpianist

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Posted 21 January 2018 - 09:29

Not really worried as such but when i last had a lesson with a teacher a couple of months ago he said some of the book is too basic for me from a music reading point of view and i am sure he said skip to module 6 where they start introducing sharps and flats which obviously i need to learn how to do on flute and then practice playing exercises as such and learning how to change fingerings without feeling I'm about to drop the flute and then of course remembering all the notes when he suddenly says play me an f sharp and now play me a c and now move from c to f sharp. And of course i need to learn tbe two ways of playing a b flat both with the flat key under the flute and playing it normally and when to decide which way to play. They say it depends what music you are playing as to whether you cheat with the flat key or not and then i have to learn to put my lips differently for high and low notes so you see basic sheet music reading is not what i need to learn. I need to learn the instrument
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#4 Arundodonuts

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Posted 21 January 2018 - 12:15

As EllieD says there if you have already things learned from other instruments you will probably come across things in beginners books which you already know and you might feel are a waste of time. I was in a similar position when taking up the oboe and to that end I started lessons using studies rather than "method`" books.

 

The "initial" study book for oboe is usually Hinke. I don't know about flute but a quick look at group C in the ABRSM syllabus shows 2 or 3 study books which crop up repeatedly from grades 1 to 5, so there is probably plenty of material there for you to get stuck into. 


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#5 Latin pianist

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Posted 21 January 2018 - 12:38

I find that when I'm learning pieces on the cello I make all sorts of timing mistakes that I would never ever make on the piano because I'm concentrating on bowing or finding the notes. So I would say at least play through everything even if you don't need to practise all the exercises.
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#6 adultpianist

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Posted 21 January 2018 - 17:08

I find that when I'm learning pieces on the cello I make all sorts of timing mistakes that I would never ever make on the piano because I'm concentrating on bowing or finding the notes. So I would say at least play through everything even if you don't need to practise all the exercises.

 

Thank you for your helpful suggestions. I skipped the module with ties and went straight onto the next one which incorporates the B flat note.   That to me was very interesting and I did the first two exercises of the new module and now I know how to play a b flat note.  At the beginning of each module when they incorporate a new note, they always put the fingering so you know how to find the note that you have not come across before.  I am finding these things fascinating.    


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#7 jpiano

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Posted 21 January 2018 - 18:25

I've been teaching myself the guitar (not ideal but lessons aren't feasible at the moment) and I've found that whilst of course as a piano teacher I know, say, what a semiquaver is, getting my fingers to do this on the guitar is another matter altogether! I just skim through the explanations (or not as it's interesting to see who they are explained) and do the actual exercises.


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#8 adultpianist

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Posted 21 January 2018 - 19:28

I've been teaching myself the guitar (not ideal but lessons aren't feasible at the moment) and I've found that whilst of course as a piano teacher I know, say, what a semiquaver is, getting my fingers to do this on the guitar is another matter altogether! I just skim through the explanations (or not as it's interesting to see who they are explained) and do the actual exercises.

 

 

Yes I fully understand where you are coming from.   How long have you been teaching yourself guitar?


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#9 gav_1988

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Posted 21 January 2018 - 19:46

What book are you using for flute? The idea of the modules seems a little bit arbitrary. When I first picked up the sax (first instrument was piano), we worked through the 'Abracadabra' book. I found that ideal to work through with a teacher, because the tunes are all stuff you probably know, but mastering things like tonguing/slurring and dynamics is a different ball game, especially if you've never played a wind instrument before, but there was essentially no need to spend any time on theory concepts, unless there were little bits that I'd forgotten about in the interim between piano and sax.


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#10 adultpianist

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Posted 21 January 2018 - 23:28

What book are you using for flute? The idea of the modules seems a little bit arbitrary. When I first picked up the sax (first instrument was piano), we worked through the 'Abracadabra' book. I found that ideal to work through with a teacher, because the tunes are all stuff you probably know, but mastering things like tonguing/slurring and dynamics is a different ball game, especially if you've never played a wind instrument before, but there was essentially no need to spend any time on theory concepts, unless there were little bits that I'd forgotten about in the interim between piano and sax.

 

Am using book learn as you play flute.   Tonight for instance  I did a C major scale by watching very carefully a youtube video and practised it a few times until I got the notes right.   However I have a Yamaha 211 flute and even though I am playing exactly the same notes as you should for a C major scale, my flute notes sound higher and the video flute notes have a deeper tone.   Maybe it has something to do with the type of flute?   This is something I need to learn.   I need to learn about the mechanism of flutes and different kinds of flutes and how they sound.   It is a bit like playing a Yamaha upright and a Steinway Grand piano.   They will both sound totally differently and the Steinway Grand will sound better and richer 

 


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#11 jpiano

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Posted 21 January 2018 - 23:29

 

I've been teaching myself the guitar (not ideal but lessons aren't feasible at the moment) and I've found that whilst of course as a piano teacher I know, say, what a semiquaver is, getting my fingers to do this on the guitar is another matter altogether! I just skim through the explanations (or not as it's interesting to see who they are explained) and do the actual exercises.

 

 

Yes I fully understand where you are coming from.   How long have you been teaching yourself guitar?

 

A good few years but it's been so off and on and always goes to the bottom of my 'to do' agenda when study, teaching and life things have arisen. Am enjoying it though and that's the important thing!


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#12 JimD

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Posted 22 January 2018 - 09:28

I play a Yamaha 211 as well - seems OK to me, though I've heard pro players get a (much) better sound than me. I personally reckon more of it is down to the player than the instrument (for evidence have a listen to a pro demonstrating student instruments).

 

EDIT: just occurred to me as well: the acoustics of the room it was recorded in will make a huge difference. When I play in my kitchen I sound pretty dull and lacking in presence, but when I'm in a big hall it sounds much richer and fuller.


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#13 LoneM

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Posted 22 January 2018 - 12:08

However I have a Yamaha 211 flute and even though I am playing exactly the same notes as you should for a C major scale, my flute notes sound higher and the video flute notes have a deeper tone.   Maybe it has something to do with the type of flute?

 

As a beginner you can't expect to get the full potential tone from your flute. It takes a lot of time and practice to develop a good embouchure which is the key to good sound, and then you need to keep on with the exercises to maintain that embouchure - lots of tiny muscles around the mouth are involved.


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#14 adultpianist

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Posted 22 January 2018 - 12:57

https://youtu.be/zJ-ejh5Y808

I would love to be able to play like this but shes probably been playing for about 30 years. By the way I'm going to a watch a masterclass by this flautist
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