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Music teacher for a 2-year old, Suzuki?

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#16 linda.ff

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Posted 05 January 2017 - 14:08

I dan't remember how my children learnt to do the reading, but I probably helped them anyway, and even once they've learnt, they still don't seem to sight-read when they start new pieces. But Suzuki told a story of two of his advanced students who had been invited to play a duet for local radio. He gave them the music and told them to go upstairs and start learning it. Only a few minutes later he heard them playing it perfectly and went up to find them playing from memory. He asked why, and they told him they'd done it once from the music so now they knew it. 

 

My daughter led her local intermediate orchestra. She was not a good reader, and the girl on the front desk with her was good, but not a "strong" leader. So she relied on  her to help her learn the music by ear, and led by playing what she knew.


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#17 Cyrilla

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Posted 12 January 2017 - 23:13

Sorry, I only just stumbled across this.

 

Jessica, where is the child based?   We run an amazing kindergarten course at Junior Guildhall on Saturdays.   This consists of both Kodály and Dalcroze approaches - both brilliant ways of developing musicianship at any age and stage.

 

Although we don't take them before they're 4 (we take Reception and Y1), the course has a waiting list as long as your arm and so if your friends are within striking distance of London, they need to get the child's name down NOW!

 

At the end of Y1 selected children move from the kindergarten to the String Training Programme, where they have an individual instrumental lesson and an instrumental ensemble as well as continuing their Kodály and Dalcroze work.   It is a wonderful musical education for them and by the time they are 11 they are really rounded young musicians.   A lot of them go on to study at the main Junior Guildhall.

 

The KG course runs in a building just opposite the Barbican tube station and children travel a long way quite often to attend - one comes from Wales every week!

 

Other than that - if you can find good, well-trained Kodály and Dalcroze teachers for young children, you won't do better in terms of general musicianship - so important and this (and any!) age.

 

Colourstrings runs kindergarten classes (later they learn an instrument) and there are other approaches for young children such as Stringbabies.   Suzuki has a lot going for it, too.   (A former student of mine, from the age of 4-18, did her Cambridge dissertation on the three approaches with which she had been brought up - Suzuki (piano), Kodály and ABRSM (violin).   It made for interesting reading...

 

Anything more you'd like to know about Kodály or Dalcroze, please just PM me.   And, yes, I wrote the Jolly Music series of books which are designed for class music but which could be adapted for individuals or small groups.

 

:)


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#18 linda.ff

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Posted 13 January 2017 - 00:06

At such a very young age, c;asses are a far better idea. It's all very well for a young child to be musically responsive and to be able to take part in activities and to enjoy and absorb what is on offer - it's quite another matter for them to be able to take instuction which is what is needed if they are going to learn to play anything.

 

I'm sure all of us who do start them at 4 or 5 will be able to describe children even at that age with whom it hasn't worked. You can "have fun" in a class even at 2 or 3, but usually it's not going to matter if you don't actually do exactly what the others are doing - hands up all those who have tried a 4/5 year old with My First Piano Adventure, particularly with a parent present (which is a cornerstone of Suzuki and which, for my part, I insist on in piano as well at that age) who has said bluntly in the middle of a lesson "I don't want to"?At that stage I'm generally quick to say "your child isn't ready for one-to-one work yet"


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