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Calling All Those Who Care.....


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#121 Aeolienne

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Posted 06 June 2014 - 23:06


Parental careers advice to children often 'out of date'

"The [Association of Colleges] says the young people interviewed wanted 'drastic changes' to careers advice, including better links with employers, the chance to 'have a go' at real jobs, longer-term work experience and relevant local information." Not, one notes, that they'd rather have less preparation for the workplace.

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#122 UnnaturalHarmonics

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Posted 07 June 2014 - 06:18

"Otherwise we risk creating a generation of young people who can recite facts, but not really understand, use, and enjoy the science behind them".

In my opinion, most of the proposed curriculum changes are going down this route, across all subjects and age ranges.

I used to be a primary school teacher. I don't want to see a class of nine year olds that can recite the dates of a lot of dead monarchs. I want to see ones that are excited and enthusiastic about the world around them and who can try something, fail, think about why they failed and try something better. I believe this so passionately and I can prove I'm not all talk: I once let one of my groups plan and try an experiment that I knew wouldn't work, then deviated from my own lesson plan with the whole class so we could all think about why that group's experiment hadn't worked and what to do next... while Ofsted were in the room. I really didn't care. They shouldn't have come to watch me if they didn't want to see how I teach :D

Incidentally, I also want to see a class of kids 'into' reading. I heard that Gove is stripping back the English Lit syllabus to exclude works by non-British authors. In my opinion the subject will be poorer for this.
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#123 Aeolienne

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Posted 02 September 2015 - 10:32

 

QUOTE(Aeolienne @ Jan 11 2011, 07:22 PM)  
 

 

QUOTE(Mad Tom @ Jan 3 2010, 11:24 AM)  


Where it goes wrong is where the state gets too involved in what is taught, how it is taught, and how it is assessed - or when education gets too single-mindedly focussed on preparation for work (the 'needs' of business) both of which have happened in the UK over the last 30 years.

Has that really happened though? I don't remember my school preparing me for the workplace.
I never said they were successful in their aims!

 

So presumably you would thoroughly disapprove of careers advice for Year 8s?

The DfE's statutory guidance requires schools to offer careers advice to pupils as young as 12-13 so they can make informed choices at age 14.


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#124 BadStrad

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Posted 02 September 2015 - 11:49

 


Students love doing practicals. The corridors of all science departments ring out with 'are we doing a practical today Miss/Sir' at the the start of nearly every lesson. Ok you have to be mindful of ensuring that each investigation is being done for a reason and that the students are being given the opportunities to learn the theory behind the investigation.

 

I hated practical work, despite doing A level Chemistry and Physics.  The physics wasn't too bad, but the chemistry practicals were torture, and all that lancing your thumb and cutting up rats in biology really wasn't to my taste.  Some of the experiments we did were really quite hazardous.  Then again that was in the days before pretty much every chemical we used was deemed too dangerous for school use.  BUT, I loved the theory behind it all and used to get quite excited by all the interaction pathways and ionic/ covalent bonding and so on.  Thankfully I had a lab partner who was my opposite so we got by OK.

 

I find it quite hilarious that I ended up teaching physics (still only lasers and radioactivity to worry about there) - and yes the kids did like doing practicals, but I suspect it was not so much for the joy of practicals but because there was less writing to be done in a practical lesson than in a theory/research based lesson.


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#125 Tortellini

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Posted 16 September 2015 - 19:47

I loved science but hated doing practicals so I ended up giving up science!


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#126 Aeolienne

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Posted 10 April 2016 - 14:06

This event in London may be of interest:

Reforms to science at GCSE and A-level: implementation, practical science and support for teachers and learners


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#127 Aeolienne

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Posted 02 July 2018 - 15:25

Another barrier to social mobility is a lack of knowledge about the world of work.

 

"I can actually get somewhere in life" (Civil Service Local blog)


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#128 jim palmer

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Posted 02 July 2018 - 15:54

I loved science but hated doing practicals so I ended up giving up science!

Same here! When doing a Physics degree in my youth my lab partner and I decided to do the theoretical option! argh.gif


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#129 Sylvette

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Posted 03 July 2018 - 09:29

I loved science practicals!  Probably why I ended up doing the degree I did and a practical, out-in-the-field, hands-on scientific job.


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#130 Aeolienne

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Posted 22 August 2018 - 11:29

 

 

QUOTE(Aeolienne @ Jan 11 2011, 07:22 PM)  
 

 

QUOTE(Mad Tom @ Jan 3 2010, 11:24 AM)  


Where it goes wrong is where the state gets too involved in what is taught, how it is taught, and how it is assessed - or when education gets too single-mindedly focussed on preparation for work (the 'needs' of business) both of which have happened in the UK over the last 30 years.

Has that really happened though? I don't remember my school preparing me for the workplace.
I never said they were successful in their aims!

 

So presumably you would thoroughly disapprove of careers advice for Year 8s?

The DfE's statutory guidance requires schools to offer careers advice to pupils as young as 12-13 so they can make informed choices at age 14.

 

 

Or what about this?

The Careers & Enterprise Company: Inspiring and preparing young people for the fast-changing world of work


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#131 Aeolienne

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Posted 18 February 2019 - 17:08


[devil's advocate]Could this be a change for the better? One thing that caught my eye was this bit: "The move has caused alarm among climate campaigners and scientists who say teaching about climate change in schools has helped mobilise young people to be the most vociferous advocates of action by governments, business and society to tackle the issue." But isn't the overemphasis on mobilising young people part of the problem? However vociferous they may be as advocates, they are not the ones in a position to make purchasing decisions on houses, cars or electricity suppliers. Isn't there a real danger of creating a generation of ultimately frustrated and disempowered individuals? Cynical I know, but I can't help notice how every few years a new generation of youngsters "discovers" the climate issue and insists that they are uniquely the generation that will bear the brunt of its consequences and/or be in a position to solve it - notwithstanding the fact that this said issue has been around for nearly 40 years. [/devil's advocate]

 

Five years on, the young'uns want to "change the curriculum to make the state of the environment an educational priority".

School pupils call for radical climate action in UK-wide strike

Plus รงa change.


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#132 Aquarelle

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Posted 18 February 2019 - 22:56

Well  if the younger generations don't eventually do something the older generations have failed to do there probably won't be any more generations to do it. We are apparently heading for another Great Extinction.


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#133 Aeolienne

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Posted 06 March 2019 - 15:39

 

 

 

QUOTE(Aeolienne @ Jan 11 2011, 07:22 PM)  
 

 

QUOTE(Mad Tom @ Jan 3 2010, 11:24 AM)  


Where it goes wrong is where the state gets too involved in what is taught, how it is taught, and how it is assessed - or when education gets too single-mindedly focussed on preparation for work (the 'needs' of business) both of which have happened in the UK over the last 30 years.

Has that really happened though? I don't remember my school preparing me for the workplace.
I never said they were successful in their aims!

 

So presumably you would thoroughly disapprove of careers advice for Year 8s?

The DfE's statutory guidance requires schools to offer careers advice to pupils as young as 12-13 so they can make informed choices at age 14.

 

 

Or what about this?

The Careers & Enterprise Company: Inspiring and preparing young people for the fast-changing world of work

 

Or this?

Top employers to help all primary schools offer careers education to pupils


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#134 Cyrilla

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Posted 06 March 2019 - 23:56

Oh, PLEASE.

 

Childhood is not just a rehearsal for adulthood.   Poor children - they are just not allowed to be children any more in our current 'education system'.   I think we've gone back to Elizabethan times when children were seen as just 'small adults'.

 

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mad.gifmad.gifmad.gif


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#135 Aquarelle

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Posted 07 March 2019 - 09:28

I am not for career guidance in primary schools. It is far too early. What I am for is widening pupils' horizons. Many of the children I currently teach have no idea of the range of different ways in which adults can earn their living. They shouldn't be confined to seeing the future with tunnel vision, knowing only what their parents and other adult members of their family do for a living, or what work happens to be available where they live. Girls in particular need to have an idea of what the future could hold for them. I am for children having a wide variety of role models - and at least some heroines and heroes  - so that they can not only have high expectations of themselves, but also the right to dream.


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