Jump to content


Photo

Piano sight-reading


  • Please log in to reply
19 replies to this topic

#1 Misterioso

Misterioso

    Virtuoso

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 5700 posts
  • Member: 13351
    Joined: 18-July 07
  • Outer Hebrides

Posted 11 December 2018 - 18:50

I have a G1 piano student who suffers from synesthesia, which has the effect of "blocking out" part of the music and preventing him from seeing it. Might this be a case where ABRSM would allow extra time for preparing the signt-reading? I've entered dyslexic children before, and they have been given two minutes. I can't find a list anywhere that gives an indication of other conditions that might affect the preparation time. Please can anyone help?


  • 0

#2 agricola

agricola

    Prodigy

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1735 posts
  • Member: 545
    Joined: 01-February 04

Posted 11 December 2018 - 22:38

There's a list under exam booking -- specific needs


  • 0

#3 Misterioso

Misterioso

    Virtuoso

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 5700 posts
  • Member: 13351
    Joined: 18-July 07
  • Outer Hebrides

Posted 12 December 2018 - 09:33

There's a list under exam booking -- specific needs

 

Many thanks, agricola.


  • 0

#4 sbhoa

sbhoa

    Maestro

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 22894 posts
  • Member: 24
    Joined: 31-October 03
  • Tameside

Posted 13 December 2018 - 12:05

I'm interested as to how his synesthesia does this.


  • 1

#5 Banjogirl

Banjogirl

    Virtuoso

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2448 posts
  • Member: 39509
    Joined: 12-September 08

Posted 13 December 2018 - 12:46

That doesn't sound like synaesthesia at all. Synaesthesia. as I'm sure you know, is a mixing of the senses. It's hard to see what other sense could be interfering with sight to stop you seeing things. It sounds more like an eye or brain problem. I get that exact effect when I have a silent migraine, and I can't see the very thing I'm looking at, though my peripheral vision is unaffected. It's very weird. If he really can't see the music he might need an alternative test. I can't see that extra time is going to help much if he can't see the music he needs to play.


  • 1

#6 agricola

agricola

    Prodigy

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1735 posts
  • Member: 545
    Joined: 01-February 04

Posted 13 December 2018 - 13:12

I get these optical migraines too -- they typically last about half-an-hour during which time I certainly wouldn't be able to sight-read but after that vision is back to normal. It's in the brain as it affects the sight in both eyes equally.


  • 0

#7 Banjogirl

Banjogirl

    Virtuoso

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2448 posts
  • Member: 39509
    Joined: 12-September 08

Posted 13 December 2018 - 13:49

Has he been checked out medically? I think I'd be seriously worried if my child exhibited such a symptom.


  • 0

#8 Misterioso

Misterioso

    Virtuoso

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 5700 posts
  • Member: 13351
    Joined: 18-July 07
  • Outer Hebrides

Posted 14 December 2018 - 13:18

That doesn't sound like synaesthesia at all. Synaesthesia. as I'm sure you know, is a mixing of the senses. It's hard to see what other sense could be interfering with sight to stop you seeing things. It sounds more like an eye or brain problem. I get that exact effect when I have a silent migraine, and I can't see the very thing I'm looking at, though my peripheral vision is unaffected. It's very weird. If he really can't see the music he might need an alternative test. I can't see that extra time is going to help much if he can't see the music he needs to play.

 

He says it's to do with his hearing, but he's a very quiet student and it's not easy to extract much information about it. From my initial research, it seems that it could actually be an advantage in some ways, but it depends on how it works for him. I will check with the list agricola pointed me to, and failing that, with the Board. He would have to provide some sort of evidence in any case, to explain exactly how it affects him. 

 

Banjogirl: Yes, he's under medical supervision for a number of conditions. 


  • 0

#9 Cyrilla

Cyrilla

    Maestro

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 14467 posts
  • Member: 99
    Joined: 09-November 03
  • Croydon, South London/Surrey

Posted 14 December 2018 - 23:12

This doesn't sound at all like synaesthesia to me.

 

:unsure:


  • 1

#10 HelenVJ

HelenVJ

    Virtuoso

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2034 posts
  • Member: 1265
    Joined: 03-May 04
  • South-East London ( OK - Penge)

Posted 15 December 2018 - 09:30

No,I agree it doesn't. I thought it was more to do with seeing music in colour -  eg a certain key might be perceived as red or blue? How does he cope with reading music in general if parts might get 'blocked out'? And how on earth will extra time help?
Maybe Trinity isn't available in your area, but of course sight-reading is optional there, which might help!


  • 0

#11 maggiemay

maggiemay

    Maestro

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 19774 posts
  • Member: 413
    Joined: 12-January 04
  • S E England

Posted 15 December 2018 - 09:42

Fwiw, I have synaesthesia, and it results in connecting keys with colour, although I am aware there are other kinds.

I do not get blocked vision when reading or sight-reading - if I do get a ‘blank spot’ it is the start of a migraine, although fortunately this is very rare.
  • 0

#12 LoneM

LoneM

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 367 posts
  • Member: 894763
    Joined: 24-November 15

Posted 15 December 2018 - 11:22

So have I - letters, names, days of the weeks and months have all been associated with colours as long as I can remember. Also numbers - very useful for Sudoku! It's a colourful world but has never affected my music reading.  Perhaps he suffers from astigmatism?


  • 0

#13 Maizie

Maizie

    Virtuoso

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 6590 posts
  • Member: 9360
    Joined: 05-February 07
  • Bishop's Stortford, Hertfordshire

Posted 15 December 2018 - 13:25

It doesn't sounds like any of the common forms of synaesthesia, but there are over 80 known types and some are rare.  But really, it doesn't matter what we label it, the pupil has Problem X and is under medical supervision for a number of things including X.  We don't need to re-diagnose smile.png

The only time the name might actually matter is if AB want a 'label' rather than a description of the problem, when it comes to assessing how they can meet his needs - but I'd hope that 'what the problem is [and how can we work around it]' will be of more importance than 'what's the problem called'.


  • 3

#14 Sautillé

Sautillé

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 81 posts
  • Member: 897314
    Joined: 15-February 17

Posted 15 December 2018 - 19:31

Hmmmm interesting post because it sounds exactly like my own problems with sightreading. I have very poor eyesight and was, as a child, a very poor sightreader. I still wouldn’t say I was great. I discovered as an adult, through conversations with a very sympathetic optician that I don’t have any binocular vision at all, so I can only see a snapshot with each eye. The result of this is that I cannot hold an object moving in space, instead I see it as a series of still shots and so bits of the pathway are lost. The effect in SR is that when I move my eyes the page often ‘disappears’ as if somebody had moved my line of music at a trajectory. Luckily for me, perfect pitch and an amazing memory have compensated a lot but SR was always on the edge for me at every grade.......
  • 2

#15 agricola

agricola

    Prodigy

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1735 posts
  • Member: 545
    Joined: 01-February 04

Posted 17 December 2018 - 12:09

That's very interesting Sautille.  It's often a puzzle when children have difficulty reading music and you can't be sure whether it's their sense of structure or their actual eyesight which is the cause -- and opticians can't always pick these things up with the standard tests.  I have one at the moment who looks very closely at each note and tells me some (but not all) of the staff lines are 'fuzzy' if she sits back.  I drew her mother's attention to this as I thought it might be caused by astigmatism and she has had her eyes tested but nothing was found.  I have a few eyesight problems myself so I know it's difficult to explain to someone else exactly what you can or can't see.


  • 0