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My first piano lesson


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#1 LearnerFlute

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Posted 23 September 2017 - 06:17

I had my very first piano lesson yesterday! It was much harder than I thought.

It was fun though and I am going to stick with it for as long as I can. We are using the Dozen a day mini books and I learned some exercises and one song which I have to practice this week.

My teacher said that already playing an instrument will help me but I feel like a total beginner and things that look easy on paper are actually hard to do practically.

LF
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#2 dorfmouse

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Posted 23 September 2017 - 07:10

Congrats on going for it and welcome to the world of adult beginners!
As a recent beginner on harp I would advise you to put all thoughts of I can play instrument x therefore I should make quick progress. (Not saying you are, but beware!) The skills of reading and coordinating two hands is a different level of difficulty from playing a single melody line. I play advanced piano but hands together on harp causes me far more difficulties and gnashing of teeth than I ever expected. Patience in enormous quantities is required! I hope you will have a wonderful journey with this great instrument.
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#3 chimichanga

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Posted 23 September 2017 - 08:00

Congrats! I still remember how nervous I felt going for my first piano lesson! It does require a lot of patience to keep on and I find the learning curve steep starting as an adult learner, but it's all worth it. It felt like a dream come true when I learnt my first piano piece, a piece I had always wanted to learn for years haha. Keep it on and all the best!


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#4 fsharpminor

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Posted 23 September 2017 - 09:52

I can still remember my first lesson on 5th January 1953.  And the teacher drawing round my hand and marking the fingers   +, 1, 2, 3, 4   

In those days we were taught 'English Fingering'.  By Grade 2 it was quite confusing to change to the 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 system we use now.

Is anyone else of sufficient years to have learnt with the old system. I can think of a few on here who might have been.


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#5 Saxwarbler

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Posted 23 September 2017 - 10:35

Congrats on going for it and welcome to the world of adult beginners!
As a recent beginner on harp I would advise you to put all thoughts of I can play instrument x therefore I should make quick progress. (Not saying you are, but beware!) The skills of reading and coordinating two hands is a different level of difficulty from playing a single melody line. I play advanced piano but hands together on harp causes me far more difficulties and gnashing of teeth than I ever expected. Patience in enormous quantities is required! I hope you will have a wonderful journey with this great instrument.

I concur. The fingers that so confidently fly over the keys on my saxophone may as well have been chocolate-coated-biscuit-filled ones when I first started piano. They're a little better these days but they still melt under the heat sometimes.

It's easy to think that because you can already read and understand music that learning a new instrument is just a matter of learning where to put your fingers. Wrong!!

As a woodwind player, you're probably used to alternate fingerings across the two octaves or so of your instrument. Suddenly we're faced with several more octaves and at least ten alternative fingerings for every single note - and that's before you even consider playing two lines together. Then there's the sheer frustration of pretty much knowing how every note/chord/bar of a piece should sound, but not being able to make the sound you have in your head.

I comfort myself by trying to remember back to when I was learning my other instruments and looking at the music I was playing - or even struggling with - after a similar period of time. Maybe look at what you played in your first couple of flute(?) lessons and compare it to what you have to practice this week.


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#6 dorfmouse

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Posted 23 September 2017 - 10:53

I can still remember my first lesson on 5th January 1953.  And the teacher drawing round my hand and marking the fingers   +, 1, 2, 3, 4   
In those days we were taught 'English Fingering'.  By Grade 2 it was quite confusing to change to the 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 system we use now.
Is anyone else of sufficient years to have learnt with the old system. I can think of a few on here who might have been.


Aw F#, I was born four days later!
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#7 mel2

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Posted 23 September 2017 - 12:12

I can still remember my first lesson on 5th January 1953.  And the teacher drawing round my hand and marking the fingers   +, 1, 2, 3, 4   
In those days we were taught 'English Fingering'.  By Grade 2 it was quite confusing to change to the 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 system we use now.
Is anyone else of sufficient years to have learnt with the old system. I can think of a few on here who might have been.


Aw F#, I was born four days later!

I'm not quite of that vintage, but I do possess several music books and pieces of sheet music that are considerably older than I am, and feature this type of fingering. Very confusing it was too, until I figured out what it meant.
Sadly these volumes are getting a bit tatty round the edges and foxed (I know the feeling!) My own lessons started at 3/6d.
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#8 fsharpminor

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Posted 23 September 2017 - 15:03

 

 

I can still remember my first lesson on 5th January 1953.  And the teacher drawing round my hand and marking the fingers   +, 1, 2, 3, 4   
In those days we were taught 'English Fingering'.  By Grade 2 it was quite confusing to change to the 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 system we use now.
Is anyone else of sufficient years to have learnt with the old system. I can think of a few on here who might have been.


Aw F#, I was born four days later!

I'm not quite of that vintage, but I do possess several music books and pieces of sheet music that are considerably older than I am, and feature this type of fingering. Very confusing it was too, until I figured out what it meant.
Sadly these volumes are getting a bit tatty round the edges and foxed (I know the feeling!) My own lessons started at 3/6d.

 

Mine were 2/6d


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#9 Witzend

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Posted 23 September 2017 - 17:13

I had my first lesson in the late 50s and don't remember anything about fingering at that stage. I would have been 9, and had already taught myself some basics from a book given to me by a kind aunt.
I seem to remember my grade one book saying 3/6d on the cover.
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#10 LearnerFlute

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Posted 24 September 2017 - 08:40

My Dozen a day mini book arrived. I've been practicing the group 1 exercises. There are so many things to worry about in the piano but I remember when I first got my flute it was hard work and I used to get dizzy. At the moment I get worn out after 10 minutes of trying to play the piano. It's not physically as hard but my mind gets in a muddle!
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#11 sbhoa

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Posted 24 September 2017 - 10:29

Do you have a tutor book too or are you only using the Dozen a Day exercises?


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#12 LearnerFlute

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Posted 24 September 2017 - 16:43

I ordered one but that hasn't arrived yet. It has pop songs to go along with the Dozen a day exercises.
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#13 EllieD

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Posted 24 September 2017 - 17:08

Good luck with the lessons, LearnerFlute!! I too am probably going to start having lessons soon - I did have lessons more than 20 years ago and probably was about grade 5-ish though I wasn't doing exams. After my long pause, I think I've got myself back where I was, and while there's still a lot I think I could do on my own, I'm thinking now that a teacher will save a lot of time and potentially problems later ... But for some reason I feel really nervous about starting!!! Did you feel anxious at all too?


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#14 LearnerFlute

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Posted 24 September 2017 - 19:30

No but I have no previous experience of piano so I don't have any expectations to meet. I just want to see how I get on. It is all very exciting! Good luck with your playing too xx
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#15 adultpianist

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Posted 24 September 2017 - 21:58

No but I have no previous experience of piano so I don't have any expectations to meet. I just want to see how I get on. It is all very exciting! Good luck with your playing too xx

Good luck.  I am the opposite.   I am a pianist who started the flute.  I still have the flute and will not get rid of it but I did not really take to the flute like the piano.   I have not really got the time or the money to learn two instruments but I did have a few flute lessons and the teacher said I had potential if I were to carry on with it.   Maybe one day I will take it up seriously but for now I am concentrating on the piano. I love the sound of the flute and on occasions pick it up and have a practice but amazingly when I do I do not seem to forget what to do and how to tongue even though I leave it at least three month between each attempt.   I got my flute from a charity shop and had it looked over by a flute teacher who said it was ok for a beginner.   I only paid £45 for it and she said it would be ok for someone up to Grade 2 and then they would need a better one if they wanted to go beyond Grade 2 as you would then be playing more complicated pieces and the cheap second hand oxfam flute would not do the pieces justice. I was always amazed that when I had my flute lessons, I was made to play standing up and yet when flautists play in an orchestra they are sitting down.   I never practice standing up but I guess it helps with the breathing.   


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