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New peripatetic teacher looking for advice.


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#1 Mumofmany

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Posted 15 November 2018 - 12:50

Hi all,

I’ve not posted in such a long time, but here goes!

Some members may recall I started teaching around a year ago (a local adult worship group) Well, things have really picked up for me lately and not only have I found myself studying an intensive two year BA voice course, hopefully leading onto MA, with some rather wonderful teachers but I’ve also got myself a job as a peripatetic teacher at an independent school. I currently have five pupils ranging from 12-14 in age who are complete beginners and extremely enthusiastic; a joy to teach actually by comparison to some of my past private pupils. However, I’m still relatively new to this and would love some advise about repertoire exercises and resources; especially for youngsters with pitch issues. Are there any must follow teacher blogs/web pages for resources (other than imslp). Any useful books? I really want to keep these children enthused! My own teachers have been fantastically helpful but there’s nothing like a hive mind. Do you have any specific pearls of wisdom you wish you’d known as a new teacher?

Many thanks in advance.
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#2 HelenVJ

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Posted 15 November 2018 - 12:56

Join AoToS (Association of Teachers of Singing) and get loads of useful info and advice from their web pages, the mentoring groups, the local hubs, plus a great magazine etc etc. For me, piano teaching has now pretty much taken over from singing,  but I still maintain membership of this group. Warmly recommended.


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#3 zwhe

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Posted 15 November 2018 - 14:01

Don't rely on children to remember to bring anything - how do you forget your flute when you leave the house specifically to go to your flute lesson?!


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#4 Dorcas

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Posted 15 November 2018 - 15:15

Keep your own record of what you want the students to practise during the week, as they will not always remember their notebooks.  Have a lesson plan, with back-up material.  Make sure the children understand to properly warm up.  Good luck.


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#5 Splog

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Posted 15 November 2018 - 15:46

I'd echo joining AOTOS. They have a course called Pathways specifically to support new singing teachers.

 

Also for pitching issues, you can't beat a bit of Kodály training.

 

Also check out Jenovera Williams. Her book and DVD Teaching singing to children and young adults is fab. I went to one of her workshops very early in my singing teaching career and got so much out of it. I wish I'd known about the other two earlier as well.


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#6 KathyB

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Posted 15 November 2018 - 16:08

Another vote for joining AOTOS. It’s the best thing I ever did when I started as a singing teacher.
Ive done the pathways and advanced professional development courses and they are brilliant.
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#7 Cyrilla

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Posted 15 November 2018 - 22:19

Certainly look into Kodály training for improving your students' general musicianship, pitching/intonation, ability to sight-sing etc.

 

Splog and others are incorporating this work successfully into their singing lessons with the teenage age group.

 

PM me if you'd like to know any more about Kodály. 

 

If you're within striking distance of S-E London next March, there's going to be a fabulous 'Holistic Voice' course, which will include Alexander Technique, vocal technique (with the greatest vocal wizard I know), Kodály musicianship and looking at the gospel idiom.

 

:) 


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#8 Misterioso

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Posted 16 November 2018 - 09:48

Don't rely on children to remember to bring anything - how do you forget your flute when you leave the house specifically to go to your flute lesson?!

 

I can be relied upon to manage this!!wacko.png


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#9 zwhe

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Posted 16 November 2018 - 10:00

 

Don't rely on children to remember to bring anything - how do you forget your flute when you leave the house specifically to go to your flute lesson?!

 

I can be relied upon to manage this!!wacko.png

 

!!!!


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#10 Norway

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Posted 16 November 2018 - 10:50

I know the feeling Misterioso! I wrote my A level Music exam essay question on Russian music and left out Tchaikovsky (despite doing a chronological essay plan of Russian composers and all their main works which I'd revised loads!) headdesk.gif


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#11 andante_in_c

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Posted 16 November 2018 - 11:09

 

Don't rely on children to remember to bring anything - how do you forget your flute when you leave the house specifically to go to your flute lesson?!

 

I can be relied upon to manage this!!wacko.png

 

I have managed it a couple of times as the flute teacher. blink.png


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#12 Hildegard

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Posted 16 November 2018 - 16:02

Do you have any specific pearls of wisdom you wish you’d known as a new teacher?
 

 

Please don't take this the wrong way but, as someone who has supervised literally thousands of reports from peris in an independent school, do please remember that advice and practice are nouns (like "ice") while their verb-equivalents are advise and practise. I couldn't tell you how many reports I have asked peri teachers to rewrite because they include things like "I advice Rebecca to practice more frequently in the practise rooms at lunchtime".  rolleyes.gif

 

Good luck with the new job!


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#13 Latin pianist

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Posted 16 November 2018 - 16:38

I totally agree, Hildegarde, just as I think all piano teachers should learn how to spell separately, but I do remember a discussion here where people said practice as a verb was fine as it occurred in American books. I don't think advise can ever be a noun.
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#14 Banjogirl

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Posted 16 November 2018 - 17:42

I don't think it's ever acceptable for English people to use American spellings.


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#15 Latin pianist

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Posted 16 November 2018 - 21:29

Being really pedantic here, is offense correct . I would have put offence.
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