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grace notes and unmarked triplets


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#1 elemimele

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Posted 12 March 2017 - 21:39

I'm puzzled. I have a pretty little Vivace from a violin concerto by Paolo Tommaso Alberghi (see IMSLP; he seems to be one of those many baroque composers who wrote a lot, of which most was lost, and what little remains is represented by a single document in IMSLP - which we're lucky to have at all - many thanks, whoever scanned it).

 

The time signature is 3/8. The first bar is no problem: 4 beamed semiquavers and a quaver.

Bar 2 has two semiquavers written a little less heavily than the rest, followed by 3 beamed quavers. I can't think of any way to play this except as a triplet in the first quaver's time, followed by two normal quavers (to my ears this sounds quite nice, but I have no idea whether it's what Alberghi intended!).

Bar 5 is the first of a series which of bars that all consist of three tied and beamed semiquavers followed by two beamed quavers. I am assuming the three semiquavers are intended to be played as a triplet? Is the tie merely an indication that they're a triplet, or does it intend slurring too? I'm playing (incorrectly) in a recorder instead of violin, so I'm on thinnish ice anyway.

 

The grace-notes bother me. I really don't know what they mean. I'm assuming the three notes must be played in the time of the first quaver as I can't see where else they could steal time from. If so, I don't know whether to let the first grace note take longer, like an arpeggiata (which it could - it gives the melody a little lilt, which feels a tiny bit like French inequality), or whether to play them more evenly, which the way I'm doing it, places the emphasis on the main note.

 

Any help greatly appreciated.


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#2 Allegra

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Posted 13 March 2017 - 09:19

Elemimele, I think the pair of grace notes
is (are?) a 'slide' (in French a 'coule' - should have an acute accent on the 'e' but don't know how to do one on my phone!) which should be played on the beat as 2 demi-semiquavers (followed by a semiquaver).

And you're right about the triplet figures!

By the way, how did you come across such a little-known composer in the first place
There seems to be hardly any information on him (at least, not that I could find).

Allegra
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#3 elemimele

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Posted 13 March 2017 - 15:48

Thanks Allegra! That makes perfect sense. As for the composer, I can't claim any erudite reason; I was merely clicking around at random in IMSLP. I'm one of those people who can't look a word up in the dictionary (or use Wikipedia) without wasting an hour and ending up somewhere completely different. I set out for Telemann, forgot his name (oops!), and never quite got there...


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#4 Allegra

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Posted 13 March 2017 - 18:13

Well, Alberghi can't be all that far away from Telemann, I suppose (6 degrees of separation?)
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#5 elemimele

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Posted 13 March 2017 - 22:08

hey, they were alive at the same time, so temporally speaking, I was pretty accurate.... :)


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#6 Hildegard

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Posted 14 March 2017 - 14:11

I'm puzzled. I have a pretty little Vivace from a violin concerto by Paolo Tommaso Alberghi (see IMSLP; he seems to be one of those many baroque composers who wrote a lot, of which most was lost, and what little remains is represented by a single document in IMSLP - which we're lucky to have at all - many thanks, whoever scanned it).

 

The New Grove lists 23 violin concertos, 14 violin sonatas amd 40+ trio sonatas by Alberghi, so there's plenty for some enterprising publisher out there!


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