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#16 musicalmalc

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Posted 28 December 2017 - 09:21

Kathleen - horses for courses - I actually find it easier to play SATB as written, always have and when I do play (rare stand-in at the moment) ones that the the congregation don't know very well are usually of the modern variety.


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#17 linda.ff

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Posted 28 December 2017 - 11:34

I was a manuals-only organist when I was needed - which was often on a Sunday morning when my dad, who was the regular organist at Street church in Somerset, wasn't ready to leave in time to start the service, and I could just choose the hymns when I got there which was an incentive. I did get good at the legato fingering needed and got to know the possibilities of the registration well enough to be able to vary the sound, but I have always been short and I was only 16 or 17 when we were doing this, and I couldn't reach the pedals easily so I rarely tried. I could do a little pedal if I had to play Jerusalem. Dad would sometimes arrive during the first hymn and slither in beside me, playing my LH part with his RH while I played my RH part with the LH and eventually slithered off the other side and slunk up into the choir stalls.

 

He had previously been organist at St. John's in Glastonbury, and we still sometimes played there when the school had a big parade service. That organ had four manuals and he could take people for guided tours round the inside of it. He fell downstairs and broke his right arm soon after we'd moved to Somerset, but only had a few days off and was back in church on Sunday playing with one hand and two feet and a lot of help from the couplers. Yes, he was left-handed, which was just as well.

 

For manuals only he gave me a book of Flor Peeters voluntaries which I'd recommend looking at. Mostly, though, I used to improvise doodle.

 

re. playing SATB, I also began without the full quota of parts, playing a little one-manual instrument for Sunday School. I played just soprano and bass parts for about the first three weeks. I did know all the hymns I played, of course, as I'd always sung them, and was used to a 4-part hymnbook, but it took some practice to get to play the four parts fluently. 


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#18 Misterioso

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Posted 28 December 2017 - 14:15

Is your church St Peters ? If so I have looked at the spec on NPOR website, and it shouldnt be too difficult to get used to it . I assume you can play hymns with four part harmony on manuals, you dont have to use pedals...http://www.npor.org.....html?RI=N18138

 

Yes, it is. I didn't know the NPOR website existed! Unfortunately, I'm not accustomed to playing four-part harmony, and during an earlier stint of not having an organist, years ago, relied on keyboard with mainly soprano and bass parts like linda.ff in post #17. However, I have time to improve!

 

Kathleen - don't worry about your recommended "un-technique". I might still default to this sometimes, being such a beginner! And congrats on passing Grade III organ. You've inspired me to go and look up the syllabus now to see what the requirements are.

 

Edit: which pieces did you play?


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#19 sbhoa

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Posted 28 December 2017 - 16:06

Kathleen, interesting advice about not overpowering. The danger then is being too cautious. Less confident singers will sing better with a decent level of sound as if you are too quiet they can hear themselves over the organ and will back off from that. 

 

Another trick with hymn harmony where you don't need to provide 4 parts for a choir is not to change the harmony every note. You can also dispense with passing notes and the like in the harmony. Trouble is that simplifying on the fly can seem more difficult than playing what's on the page if you are not used to it and/or don't understand how. 


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#20 elemimele

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Posted 28 December 2017 - 18:44

The main take-home message is that 4-part harmony hymns are harder than they look, so there is no shame in admitting that it's difficult. I'd endorse sbhoa's comments about simplifying on-the-fly being quite tricky to do; also I hate hate hate to veer away from anything linda.ff writes, but I'd say doodling on the organ is also surprisingly difficult and best not attempted unless you're confident and capable at improvisation(*). Kathleen, in accompanying for small congregations whatever keeps them happy is Right; I couldn't play chords to a melody because it's not something I've ever learned to do, but if it works for you and they like it, I wouldn't worry too much if it's something you want to do. It wouldn't work when accompanying a good choir who want to sing in parts (but then again, a choir like that can get very frustrated with the over-excited organist who insists on changing the harmonies in the last verse. There's nothing more irritating than tenoring along quite happily and then being lurched into discords as the organist goes off on an ego-trip.

 

Support: yes, it's a balancing act of giving enough sound to support the congregation so they don't feel naked and exposed, but not so much that they're drowned. In small organs, the open diapason may be hugely ferocious compared to any other stop, which can be irritating. I personally think it's a very good idea always to include something above 8' pitch even with a tiny congregation, because quiet 8' pitch is the most likely sound to become inaudible to an individual singing in their own 8' voice. The worst mistake I ever made as a teenager was to try a verse on swell oboe 8' alone (hideous, embarrassing). Totally inaudible, even to me.

 

(* improvisation! This is a personal bee in my bonnet. It is a reverse of the usual rule that people who are unskilled at a trade usually overestimate their abilities, while the good estimate more accurately or more pessimistically. From a congregational point of view, I feel that many otherwise very skilled organists live in a world of self-delusion when it comes to improvisation. Because they've studied harmony, can transpose at sight, run a choir, and sight-read complex music, they believe they can also improvise. But it sounds horrible, rambling around at random, never quite going anywhere, with chord sequences that don't match the attempt-at-a-melody, and cadences that happen in the left hand a bar or two away from where they happened in the right... Those of us who cannot improvise would do better to stay quiet. Or find a repertoire of tiny space-fillers that we can use as necessary. Silence is not evil.)

 

(Edit: feeling rather guilty about the rant above; there are some lovely improvisers too who have given me a lot of pleasure... Maybe I'm just jealous because I'm rubbish at improvisation; maybe I'm just scarred by childhood listening, or maybe it's a skill that most people have to study rather than just "have", but since, by definition, it's something creative and done on the fly, there is a temptation to believe that it is somehow not susceptible to study and preparation?? Who knows? I don't.)


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#21 adultpianist

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Posted 28 December 2017 - 22:30

The main take-home message is that 4-part harmony hymns are harder than they look, so there is no shame in admitting that it's difficult. I'd endorse sbhoa's comments about simplifying on-the-fly being quite tricky to do; also I hate hate hate to veer away from anything linda.ff writes, but I'd say doodling on the organ is also surprisingly difficult and best not attempted unless you're confident and capable at improvisation(*). Kathleen, in accompanying for small congregations whatever keeps them happy is Right; I couldn't play chords to a melody because it's not something I've ever learned to do, but if it works for you and they like it, I wouldn't worry too much if it's something you want to do. It wouldn't work when accompanying a good choir who want to sing in parts (but then again, a choir like that can get very frustrated with the over-excited organist who insists on changing the harmonies in the last verse. There's nothing more irritating than tenoring along quite happily and then being lurched into discords as the organist goes off on an ego-trip.

 

Support: yes, it's a balancing act of giving enough sound to support the congregation so they don't feel naked and exposed, but not so much that they're drowned. In small organs, the open diapason may be hugely ferocious compared to any other stop, which can be irritating. I personally think it's a very good idea always to include something above 8' pitch even with a tiny congregation, because quiet 8' pitch is the most likely sound to become inaudible to an individual singing in their own 8' voice. The worst mistake I ever made as a teenager was to try a verse on swell oboe 8' alone (hideous, embarrassing). Totally inaudible, even to me.

 

(* improvisation! This is a personal bee in my bonnet. It is a reverse of the usual rule that people who are unskilled at a trade usually overestimate their abilities, while the good estimate more accurately or more pessimistically. From a congregational point of view, I feel that many otherwise very skilled organists live in a world of self-delusion when it comes to improvisation. Because they've studied harmony, can transpose at sight, run a choir, and sight-read complex music, they believe they can also improvise. But it sounds horrible, rambling around at random, never quite going anywhere, with chord sequences that don't match the attempt-at-a-melody, and cadences that happen in the left hand a bar or two away from where they happened in the right... Those of us who cannot improvise would do better to stay quiet. Or find a repertoire of tiny space-fillers that we can use as necessary. Silence is not evil.)

 

(Edit: feeling rather guilty about the rant above; there are some lovely improvisers too who have given me a lot of pleasure... Maybe I'm just jealous because I'm rubbish at improvisation; maybe I'm just scarred by childhood listening, or maybe it's a skill that most people have to study rather than just "have", but since, by definition, it's something creative and done on the fly, there is a temptation to believe that it is somehow not susceptible to study and preparation?? Who knows? I don't.)

I am a g5 pianist although I never took the G5 exam.   I would not dream of attempting to pay an organ because it is very hard.  You not only have to play the keys but all the foot pedals as well.   Even my piano teacher would not want to play an organ.   By the way what is a manual only organist?  If you play an organ without the foot pedals you are not giving it justice.   So not for me but good luck if thats what you wanna do


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#22 sbhoa

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Posted 28 December 2017 - 22:40

 

The main take-home message is that 4-part harmony hymns are harder than they look, so there is no shame in admitting that it's difficult. I'd endorse sbhoa's comments about simplifying on-the-fly being quite tricky to do; also I hate hate hate to veer away from anything linda.ff writes, but I'd say doodling on the organ is also surprisingly difficult and best not attempted unless you're confident and capable at improvisation(*). Kathleen, in accompanying for small congregations whatever keeps them happy is Right; I couldn't play chords to a melody because it's not something I've ever learned to do, but if it works for you and they like it, I wouldn't worry too much if it's something you want to do. It wouldn't work when accompanying a good choir who want to sing in parts (but then again, a choir like that can get very frustrated with the over-excited organist who insists on changing the harmonies in the last verse. There's nothing more irritating than tenoring along quite happily and then being lurched into discords as the organist goes off on an ego-trip.

 

Support: yes, it's a balancing act of giving enough sound to support the congregation so they don't feel naked and exposed, but not so much that they're drowned. In small organs, the open diapason may be hugely ferocious compared to any other stop, which can be irritating. I personally think it's a very good idea always to include something above 8' pitch even with a tiny congregation, because quiet 8' pitch is the most likely sound to become inaudible to an individual singing in their own 8' voice. The worst mistake I ever made as a teenager was to try a verse on swell oboe 8' alone (hideous, embarrassing). Totally inaudible, even to me.

 

(* improvisation! This is a personal bee in my bonnet. It is a reverse of the usual rule that people who are unskilled at a trade usually overestimate their abilities, while the good estimate more accurately or more pessimistically. From a congregational point of view, I feel that many otherwise very skilled organists live in a world of self-delusion when it comes to improvisation. Because they've studied harmony, can transpose at sight, run a choir, and sight-read complex music, they believe they can also improvise. But it sounds horrible, rambling around at random, never quite going anywhere, with chord sequences that don't match the attempt-at-a-melody, and cadences that happen in the left hand a bar or two away from where they happened in the right... Those of us who cannot improvise would do better to stay quiet. Or find a repertoire of tiny space-fillers that we can use as necessary. Silence is not evil.)

 

(Edit: feeling rather guilty about the rant above; there are some lovely improvisers too who have given me a lot of pleasure... Maybe I'm just jealous because I'm rubbish at improvisation; maybe I'm just scarred by childhood listening, or maybe it's a skill that most people have to study rather than just "have", but since, by definition, it's something creative and done on the fly, there is a temptation to believe that it is somehow not susceptible to study and preparation?? Who knows? I don't.)

I am a g5 pianist although I never took the G5 exam.   I would not dream of attempting to pay an organ because it is very hard.  You not only have to play the keys but all the foot pedals as well.   Even my piano teacher would not want to play an organ.   By the way what is a manual only organist?  If you play an organ without the foot pedals you are not giving it justice.   So not for me but good luck if thats what you wanna do

 

We are mostly not talking about those who have chosen to learn to play the organ but those who step in to play when there is no organist available.

In this case for very many congregations someone who manages to accompany hymns on the organ even without pedals is very welcome and better than having to sing unaccompanied or to recorded music. 

Some of these people do go on to learn the organ properly but not all even want to.


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#23 elemimele

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Posted 28 December 2017 - 23:05

Oh, Sbhoa, I couldn't agree more! Those who step in when no "proper" organist is available are really valuable, not only to their churches but to the instrument (without them, many organs would be completely unplayed and unheard).

 

There is nothing wrong with playing manuals only. A person who plays manuals only can still call themselves an organist. In the UK, the pedals were actually quite a late addition to the organ, and a lot of our best native organ music was written without pedals: everything from Byrd, Tomkins, Stanley, Boyce, Purcell. A lot of this is beautiful stuff. I once attended a cathedral where for small evening services, the organist used a little 1-manual organ in a side-chapel, and frankly it showed his musicality quite as fully as the huge main organ - I used to enjoy listening to the little organ as much as the big.

 

I think pedals become a big issue because they're something that sticks out as very unlike a piano, but in a way, touch is an even bigger difference. Someone raised the question of legato versus staccato. The obvious issues with the organ are (1) that the end of a note is just as emphatic as its beginning, and (2) there is no way to play an individual note more loudly. In order to achieve a feeling of musicality and phrasing, in order to emphasise the stronger notes and hide the weaker, the organist has to make use of (1) to deal with (2) ; the organist can alter the lengths of notes, subtly changing articulation, to create an illusion of the dynamics a pianist would naturally choose. The difficult for many pressed-pianists is that they're used to a percussion instrument, and are tempted to hit the note and not worry too much about the rest - which can lead to very chopsticks staccato playing. The remedy is to learn to play legato, with all that changing fingers on keys etc., but after a while that grates on the ear too (who was it who wrote of the organ that it is a monster that never breathes?) - hence the need to learn, at some point, to play with the whole range of articulation. Pianists have a massive advantage in having all that finger dexterity and knowledge of keyboard geography, and the ability to read multi-line notation.

 

In fact, for learning touch and articulation, manuals only is fine. Peter Hurford wrote a very good book (I think it's called "Making music on the organ") that goes into articulation in a very accessible and useful way.

 

(Of course you're right too about doing the instrument justice: pedals are inevitable sooner or later: where would we be without the likes of Bach, and there's a limit as to how much of his music can be squished into manuals only.)


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#24 Kathleen Austen

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Posted 29 December 2017 - 00:16

 

The main take-home message is that 4-part harmony hymns are harder than they look, so there is no shame in admitting that it's difficult. I'd endorse sbhoa's comments about simplifying on-the-fly being quite tricky to do; also I hate hate hate to veer away from anything linda.ff writes, but I'd say doodling on the organ is also surprisingly difficult and best not attempted unless you're confident and capable at improvisation(*). Kathleen, in accompanying for small congregations whatever keeps them happy is Right; I couldn't play chords to a melody because it's not something I've ever learned to do, but if it works for you and they like it, I wouldn't worry too much if it's something you want to do. It wouldn't work when accompanying a good choir who want to sing in parts (but then again, a choir like that can get very frustrated with the over-excited organist who insists on changing the harmonies in the last verse. There's nothing more irritating than tenoring along quite happily and then being lurched into discords as the organist goes off on an ego-trip.

 

Support: yes, it's a balancing act of giving enough sound to support the congregation so they don't feel naked and exposed, but not so much that they're drowned. In small organs, the open diapason may be hugely ferocious compared to any other stop, which can be irritating. I personally think it's a very good idea always to include something above 8' pitch even with a tiny congregation, because quiet 8' pitch is the most likely sound to become inaudible to an individual singing in their own 8' voice. The worst mistake I ever made as a teenager was to try a verse on swell oboe 8' alone (hideous, embarrassing). Totally inaudible, even to me.

 

(* improvisation! This is a personal bee in my bonnet. It is a reverse of the usual rule that people who are unskilled at a trade usually overestimate their abilities, while the good estimate more accurately or more pessimistically. From a congregational point of view, I feel that many otherwise very skilled organists live in a world of self-delusion when it comes to improvisation. Because they've studied harmony, can transpose at sight, run a choir, and sight-read complex music, they believe they can also improvise. But it sounds horrible, rambling around at random, never quite going anywhere, with chord sequences that don't match the attempt-at-a-melody, and cadences that happen in the left hand a bar or two away from where they happened in the right... Those of us who cannot improvise would do better to stay quiet. Or find a repertoire of tiny space-fillers that we can use as necessary. Silence is not evil.)

 

(Edit: feeling rather guilty about the rant above; there are some lovely improvisers too who have given me a lot of pleasure... Maybe I'm just jealous because I'm rubbish at improvisation; maybe I'm just scarred by childhood listening, or maybe it's a skill that most people have to study rather than just "have", but since, by definition, it's something creative and done on the fly, there is a temptation to believe that it is somehow not susceptible to study and preparation?? Who knows? I don't.)

I am a g5 pianist although I never took the G5 exam.   I would not dream of attempting to pay an organ because it is very hard.  You not only have to play the keys but all the foot pedals as well.   Even my piano teacher would not want to play an organ.   By the way what is a manual only organist?  If you play an organ without the foot pedals you are not giving it justice.   So not for me but good luck if thats what you wanna do

 

 

Not all organs actually have pedalboards. I know of (not played = haloed territory!) a particularly beautiful organ at the parish church my mother attends in Breugel, Holland (Son en Breugel) - and I took a peek at it, around the corner of the door at the top of the very steep and tight spiral staircase and I'm sure it didn't have a pedalboard that I could see ... (only very good, professional organists were allowed anywhere near that instrument)


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#25 Kathleen Austen

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Posted 29 December 2017 - 00:24

The main take-home message is that 4-part harmony hymns are harder than they look, so there is no shame in admitting that it's difficult. I'd endorse sbhoa's comments about simplifying on-the-fly being quite tricky to do; also I hate hate hate to veer away from anything linda.ff writes, but I'd say doodling on the organ is also surprisingly difficult and best not attempted unless you're confident and capable at improvisation(*). Kathleen, in accompanying for small congregations whatever keeps them happy is Right; I couldn't play chords to a melody because it's not something I've ever learned to do, but if it works for you and they like it, I wouldn't worry too much if it's something you want to do. It wouldn't work when accompanying a good choir who want to sing in parts (but then again, a choir like that can get very frustrated with the over-excited organist who insists on changing the harmonies in the last verse. There's nothing more irritating than tenoring along quite happily and then being lurched into discords as the organist goes off on an ego-trip.

 

Support: yes, it's a balancing act of giving enough sound to support the congregation so they don't feel naked and exposed, but not so much that they're drowned. In small organs, the open diapason may be hugely ferocious compared to any other stop, which can be irritating. I personally think it's a very good idea always to include something above 8' pitch even with a tiny congregation, because quiet 8' pitch is the most likely sound to become inaudible to an individual singing in their own 8' voice. The worst mistake I ever made as a teenager was to try a verse on swell oboe 8' alone (hideous, embarrassing). Totally inaudible, even to me.

 

(* improvisation! This is a personal bee in my bonnet. It is a reverse of the usual rule that people who are unskilled at a trade usually overestimate their abilities, while the good estimate more accurately or more pessimistically. From a congregational point of view, I feel that many otherwise very skilled organists live in a world of self-delusion when it comes to improvisation. Because they've studied harmony, can transpose at sight, run a choir, and sight-read complex music, they believe they can also improvise. But it sounds horrible, rambling around at random, never quite going anywhere, with chord sequences that don't match the attempt-at-a-melody, and cadences that happen in the left hand a bar or two away from where they happened in the right... Those of us who cannot improvise would do better to stay quiet. Or find a repertoire of tiny space-fillers that we can use as necessary. Silence is not evil.)

 

(Edit: feeling rather guilty about the rant above; there are some lovely improvisers too who have given me a lot of pleasure... Maybe I'm just jealous because I'm rubbish at improvisation; maybe I'm just scarred by childhood listening, or maybe it's a skill that most people have to study rather than just "have", but since, by definition, it's something creative and done on the fly, there is a temptation to believe that it is somehow not susceptible to study and preparation?? Who knows? I don't.)

 

Giggle ... I simply couldn't 'improvise' even if I were taught. I think it is something - an ability perhaps - that one is born with. I know for myself that improvising will never happen. As a 6/7/8 year old, doing ballet, my worst nightmare was when the teacher instructed us, each in turn, to improvise a little dance at every lesson. The other girls twirled and skipped and bounced away happily ... I HATED it with a passion, second only to being instructed to play 'hot gospel hymns' on a pipe organ with "wannabe singers" caterwauling next to me! ... okay, I'll get off my soapbox now - rant for the day done tongue.png 


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#26 Kathleen Austen

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Posted 29 December 2017 - 00:48

The main take-home message is that 4-part harmony hymns are harder than they look, so there is no shame in admitting that it's difficult. I'd endorse sbhoa's comments about simplifying on-the-fly being quite tricky to do; also I hate hate hate to veer away from anything linda.ff writes, but I'd say doodling on the organ is also surprisingly difficult and best not attempted unless you're confident and capable at improvisation(*). Kathleen, in accompanying for small congregations whatever keeps them happy is Right; I couldn't play chords to a melody because it's not something I've ever learned to do, but if it works for you and they like it, I wouldn't worry too much if it's something you want to do. It wouldn't work when accompanying a good choir who want to sing in parts (but then again, a choir like that can get very frustrated with the over-excited organist who insists on changing the harmonies in the last verse. There's nothing more irritating than tenoring along quite happily and then being lurched into discords as the organist goes off on an ego-trip.

 

Support: yes, it's a balancing act of giving enough sound to support the congregation so they don't feel naked and exposed, but not so much that they're drowned. In small organs, the open diapason may be hugely ferocious compared to any other stop, which can be irritating. I personally think it's a very good idea always to include something above 8' pitch even with a tiny congregation, because quiet 8' pitch is the most likely sound to become inaudible to an individual singing in their own 8' voice. The worst mistake I ever made as a teenager was to try a verse on swell oboe 8' alone (hideous, embarrassing). Totally inaudible, even to me.

 

(* improvisation! This is a personal bee in my bonnet. It is a reverse of the usual rule that people who are unskilled at a trade usually overestimate their abilities, while the good estimate more accurately or more pessimistically. From a congregational point of view, I feel that many otherwise very skilled organists live in a world of self-delusion when it comes to improvisation. Because they've studied harmony, can transpose at sight, run a choir, and sight-read complex music, they believe they can also improvise. But it sounds horrible, rambling around at random, never quite going anywhere, with chord sequences that don't match the attempt-at-a-melody, and cadences that happen in the left hand a bar or two away from where they happened in the right... Those of us who cannot improvise would do better to stay quiet. Or find a repertoire of tiny space-fillers that we can use as necessary. Silence is not evil.)

 

(Edit: feeling rather guilty about the rant above; there are some lovely improvisers too who have given me a lot of pleasure... Maybe I'm just jealous because I'm rubbish at improvisation; maybe I'm just scarred by childhood listening, or maybe it's a skill that most people have to study rather than just "have", but since, by definition, it's something creative and done on the fly, there is a temptation to believe that it is somehow not susceptible to study and preparation?? Who knows? I don't.)

 

The little organ I play, on Sundays, used to be at Rainham RC, Kent. Or, so I've heard. The 8' Oboe on the Swell, for some reason, is particularly harsh, so I never play using that stop. I use all the stops on the Great, which are fine and the pipes 'behave' themselves. Sadly, the Geigen Principle 4' on the Swell is 'dodgy', so I tend to leave that alone as well ... I use the couplers including Swell/Great to pedal. No problems there. The only pipe given for the pedals in their own right, is a 16' Bourdon. I tried it once and nearly fell off the bench with fright! Need to be braver me thinks wink.png 

Yes, I am still very, very conscious of my lack of playing skill and I suspect that it may be a reason why I am not braver with the use of stops.

I'm desperate to get comfortable with playing SATB as I do believe that is the way to go. SATB music does sound much fuller. I want to be able to support a choir with ease, one day, should that situation ever be presented to me. For the meantime, for the sake of 'getting the job done', I continue using my simplified chording system and ease myself into SATB by throwing in some SATB at verse ends, or for choruses, where I feel it is not too obvious that I'm changing 'style'. I'm alone up in the loft - no choir so, for the moment, I think I'm relatively safe on that score. Sometimes it is difficult for me to understand what's happening down in the congregation.

After a 3 hour music lesson this evening, I think I can face the next two Sundays hymns and carols. Post mortem may consists of one word ... wacko.png 


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#27 sbhoa

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Posted 29 December 2017 - 12:02

Oh, Sbhoa, I couldn't agree more! Those who step in when no "proper" organist is available are really valuable, not only to their churches but to the instrument (without them, many organs would be completely unplayed and unheard).

 

There is nothing wrong with playing manuals only. A person who plays manuals only can still call themselves an organist.

 

 

I tended to refer to myself as 'the person who play the organ' rather than 'the organist'.

At the Christingle service I was introduced as the musical director :o


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#28 Barry Williams

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Posted 29 December 2017 - 16:56

All of the above confirms the view that playing the notes of hymn tunes is far from easy.

 

The layout in most hymn books is that of four part harmony, so the tails do not disclose which hand should play the notes.  It is worthwhile writing out the tunes as they will be played.  I have done this for a number of tricky hymn tunes.  Herbert Howell's 'Michael' is well-known for difficulty, as is W. H. Ferguson's 'Wolvercote.  Each tune only needs to be written out once.  It is a worthwhile exercise, which I have done many times, particularly for verse when I wish to invert the harmony so as to provide a solo in the tenor, for example.

 

Barry Williams


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#29 elemimele

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Posted 29 December 2017 - 17:58

Sbhoa, now that you've also provided Misterioso with useful tips on hymnody, you're probably a Consultant Ecclesiastical Musicologist.

 

Barry Williams, what a good idea! Especially with things like MuseScore now readily available, why on earth not write things out in the most useful format? 


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#30 Kathleen Austen

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Posted 29 December 2017 - 23:16

Sbhoa, now that you've also provided Misterioso with useful tips on hymnody, you're probably a Consultant Ecclesiastical Musicologist.

 

Barry Williams, what a good idea! Especially with things like MuseScore now readily available, why on earth not write things out in the most useful format? 

 

MuseScore has been an absolute life saver for me! The advantage that it has for me, personally, is that as I progress up the ranks, I convert my feeble chording system slowly back to SATB. The added advantage for me is that I can print out the music on A4 sheets, or even A3 (for 2+ pages) as I find that easier to read than squinting at some horrid, bulky, A5 size, small fonted ninja.gif, hymn book especially designed to leap off the music rack and land on your hands mid chorus line blink.png!


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