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#376 Tortellini

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Posted 21 February 2017 - 17:54

 

 

It seems very harsh to write off language degrees as a waste of time. 

I don't think they are a waste of time - I teach on one!  :lol:  I do, however, think that these days (especially with the cost of fees - something which I didn't have to contend with) students (unfortunately) have to look at the bigger picture and what can actually be of use in the job market. That's not to say that no-one should study, say, 17th century Italian poetry - they should if they want to, but also be aware that they are going to probably have to do something else to make themselves marketable. When I look at my contemporaries from school, with very few exceptions, my female friends are doing relatively low-paid jobs compared to my male friends (despite doing better academically  :P ). This is only in part due to their choice of course at university, but it is a part!


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#377 Aeolienne

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Posted 30 June 2017 - 10:55

One bit of advice I received recently on how to use my languages was to get a penpal. Seriously?!


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#378 linda.ff

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Posted 02 July 2017 - 13:28

 

 

 

It seems very harsh to write off language degrees as a waste of time. 

I don't think they are a waste of time - I teach on one!  :lol:  I do, however, think that these days (especially with the cost of fees - something which I didn't have to contend with) students (unfortunately) have to look at the bigger picture and what can actually be of use in the job market. That's not to say that no-one should study, say, 17th century Italian poetry - they should if they want to, but also be aware that they are going to probably have to do something else to make themselves marketable. When I look at my contemporaries from school, with very few exceptions, my female friends are doing relatively low-paid jobs compared to my male friends (despite doing better academically  :P ). This is only in part due to their choice of course at university, but it is a part!

 

I can't see how it's any less "useful" than a degree in English. Or history for that matter. Most English or History graduates get jobs because their degrees are looked upon as receipts for a good general education.

 

My #2 daughter did Biblical Studies at Sheffield (actually combined with philosophy to begin with, but she dropped the philosophy modules after a couple of terms). Her grandmother thought it was a waste of time, especially as she was and still is an unbeliever. "Surely the only job open to her would be a vicar?" said Grandma. But although her employment history is a bit chequered, most work she has got has been on the basis of being a quick and flexible thinker.


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#379 Aeolienne

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Posted 04 July 2017 - 13:16

The last foreign-language film I saw was Frantz, which is in both French and German. There was a bit where the line "Vouz parlez bien français?" was subtitled as "Do you speak French fluently?" Surely the French for "fluently" is "couramment" which is considerably more advanced than "bien".


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#380 Aeolienne

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Posted 11 May 2018 - 14:14

Check out this new initiative from Aston University (in Birmingham)...
 
• National centre set up to promote learning all kinds of subjects in a foreign language
• Year 10s at one school make a grade-and-a-half more progress after learning their usual school subjects in French
 
A national centre dedicated to the teaching of school subjects in a foreign language has been launched.
 
The scheme, led by Aston University and Bordesley Green Girls’ School with input from Birmingham City Council, forms part of efforts to increase uptake of students deciding to continue studying modern languages, and to raise achievement levels across all subjects.
 
Learning Through Languages UK will connect the existing community of teachers and lecturers that deliver lessons in a foreign language, known as CLIL (Content and Language Integrated Learning).
 
The ultimate aim is to develop a ‘golden thread’ of language learning from primary school through to university.
 
Dr Emmanuelle Labeau, Co-Director of the Centre for Language Research (CLaRA) at Aston University and one of the lead academics, said: “Across the country there are pockets of activity in CLIL, but these remain fragmented and lack sustainability. Evidence of CLIL’s application in other countries has shown how a national centre can spread the word and use of CLIL and consequently the improvement in both language acquisition and achievement. We believe that language is a skill that can be accessed by all, and given the right approach, children from any context and at any level can achieve success.”
 
Bordesley Green Girls’ School has seen a rise in all key stage three subjects thanks to the adoption of CLIL.
89% of students at the school study languages at GCSE and 81% of those girls said that they enjoy the subject.
 
Judith Woodfield Head Teacher said: “Year 10 students who have studied geography, business and science in French in years 7 and 8 are making over a grade-and-a-half more progress in humanities subjects, a grade higher in French and two-thirds of a grade higher in other Ebacc subjects.
 
“We believe that our international curriculum is developing the problem solving skills needed to access the more challenging GCSEs. Nationally modern foreign languages are not being taken up by all students as they are perceived as being harder. Our students enter the school well below the national average, but their tremendous motivation towards languages and learning subjects through languages is ensuring that that they have the best possible chance of reaching higher levels of attainment.”
 
The centre was launched at the school on Friday April 27th, with representatives from the Department for Education, teachers’ associations and distinguished scholars due to attend.
 

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#381 Sylvette

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Posted 12 May 2018 - 13:16

I would have loved that!  The idea of learning physics or history in French is really appealing.  Learning Russian via the medium of French would have been interesting...


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#382 Aquarelle

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Posted 13 May 2018 - 23:20

I'm doing a history of music series of texts in English with my  French secondary school age piano pupils. They like it rather more than I thought they would - sort of killing two birds with one stone.


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