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Pedants' Paradise


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#16 maggiemay

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Posted 29 December 2010 - 12:49

Maizie - LOL - brilliant. Thanks for the laugh.

Oh yes, less and fewer. That is definitely one for the list.

And people who say Feb-you-erry. We'll hear a few of those over the next few weeks, no doubt.

(ed) I think I might be with Lucky045 on the noun-verb thing - maybe comes in the category of creative use of language.
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#17 wendywoo

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Posted 29 December 2010 - 13:01

QUOTE(lucky045 @ Dec 29 2010, 12:29 PM) View Post

I get annoyed when people say less instead of fewer, or vice versa. Also, incorrect use of the term "literally" drives me crazy (metaphorically). I get so annoyed by people saying things like 'she is literally driving me up the wall!'.

'They're', 'there' and 'their' are all different words with distinct meanings. Likewise 'your' and 'you're'.

Can anyone explain to me why something cannot be "so fun" though? Since Miranda started I've been saying "such fun" anyway, but I don't really understand why it's necessary...


Because fun is a noun. I can't think of any noun you can use with so. (Waits for all the examples of so + noun hides.gif ). You can use so funny because it's an adjective.
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#18 flobiano

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Posted 29 December 2010 - 13:03

Also, why are things now described as "on trend"? Is the word fashionable...um....off trend? tongue.gif
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#19 Arundodonuts

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Posted 29 December 2010 - 13:09

Sickth.

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#20 Cyrilla

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Posted 29 December 2010 - 13:39

QUOTE(maggiemay @ Dec 29 2010, 12:49 PM) View Post

Maizie - LOL - brilliant. Thanks for the laugh.

Oh yes, less and fewer. That is definitely one for the list.

And people who say Feb-you-erry. We'll hear a few of those over the next few weeks, no doubt.

(ed) I think I might be with Lucky045 on the noun-verb thing - maybe comes in the category of creative use of language.


Yes - Maizie - wonderful laugh.gif !!

Ah - I also hate 'seck-er-terry'...

I never get the apostrophe wrong in its/it's because, in my mind's eye, I can see my old English teacher's Red Pen across the top of my work...'it's = it is'...

*enjoys thread*
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#21 Guest: lucky045_*

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Posted 29 December 2010 - 13:41

My primary school teachers taught me how to spell February by repeating "it's not the way it sounds! It has an extra R in there that you don't pronounce!"

It's only lately that I've realised you're actually SUPPOSED to pronounce it Feb-roo-erry, and I'm completely mortified about it!
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#22 miffy

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Posted 29 December 2010 - 13:41

saying garrige instead of garage.

We use aesir's 'tasty' as a name-noun. It's a particular meal we occasionally have when one of us has had a bad day or we just can't think of anything else to cook. So the kids will say "can we have Tasty for dinner please?"
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#23 Czerny

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Posted 29 December 2010 - 13:49

QUOTE(miffy @ Dec 29 2010, 01:41 PM) View Post

saying garrige instead of garage.

Isn't this just the British rather than American pronunciation? unsure.gif
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#24 saxophile

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Posted 29 December 2010 - 13:52

One which annoys me is confusion between "dependant" (noun) and "dependent" (adjective). My "dependent" child is my "dependant" - not vice versa!! The way to remember it is that if you could say "a dependant", with nothing more, then it's dependant.

I also can't bear the way speech (especially children's / teenagers' speech) is punctuated with meaningless uses of the word "like". "I was, like, getting my bag, and this boy said to me, like, ... " AAAAARGHHH!

Beyond that, it's punctuation errors which irritate me the most. In particular, commas in the place of colons, semi-colons or full-stops; and the truly horrible grocer's apostrophe. ill.gif
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#25 Arundodonuts

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Posted 29 December 2010 - 13:55

QUOTE(saxophile @ Dec 29 2010, 01:52 PM) View Post

Beyond that, it's punctuation errors which irritate me the most. In particular, commas in the place of colons, semi-colons or full-stops; and the truly horrible grocer's apostrophe. ill.gif

But the plural of potato is, like, potato's, innit?
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#26 jm-hamilton

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Posted 29 December 2010 - 14:07

"Less" and "fewer" - I shout at the radio when I hear these two wrongly used.

"Sickth" - I hate this too

One I've noticed recently is the pronunciation of "nuclear". I say "new-clear" but I've heard a lot of people pronounce it "new-colour" (that's the nearest I can get to how I've heard it.)
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#27 Maizie

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Posted 29 December 2010 - 14:17

Nu-cue-lar is sufficinetly common as a US pronunciation that it makes it in to dictionaries (usually as a 'colloquial' alternative pronunciation).

They're 'nukes', you see, so obviously the full work is nuke-ular biggrin.gif
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#28 Czerny

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Posted 29 December 2010 - 14:20

QUOTE(Maizie @ Dec 29 2010, 02:17 PM) View Post

Nu-cue-lar is sufficinetly common as a US pronunciation that it makes it in to dictionaries (usually as a 'colloquial' alternative pronunciation).

They're 'nukes', you see, so obviously the full work is nuke-ular biggrin.gif

That one was a Bushism, wasn't it?
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#29 Banjogirl

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Posted 29 December 2010 - 14:22

'Driveway' instead of 'drive' and 'park up' instead of 'park', and all the other similar horrible American elongated words.
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#30 willobie

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Posted 29 December 2010 - 14:24

'Regularly' and 'frequently' - I'm forever getting those two wrong and it really annoys Mr Willobie...

W tongue.gif
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