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Alma Deutscher


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#1 Cyrilla

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Posted 01 February 2014 - 22:23

I wondered how many readers have come across this little girl?   I first heard of her last year when she'd written the opera and have just seen this - for anyone with half an hour to spare:

 

http://www.youtube.c...h?v=KPMiYi8btjk

 

I'd be interested to hear your thoughts/comments/observations!

 

:)


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#2 soccermom

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Posted 02 February 2014 - 08:36

I haven't had time to watch yet, but will with interest.  I came across Alma when she was five. She was playing in the NCO under 11s at the age of 6.  I imagine there will be a number of people here who will know her, or of her.


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#3 Spanish Pavane

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Posted 02 February 2014 - 18:52

Absolutely wonderful - what a lovely girl and what a lovely man as well.  Amazing and it just gives you a warm glow!


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#4 GMc

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Posted 03 February 2014 - 03:04

Lovely girl.  Lucky teachers.  I  would imagine that this is unikely to be the only subject she excels in too judging by that conversation.  Anyone know which country she started off in?  DD went to a music camp in Italy and was very impressed that most of the Europeans (not the Brits though) could sight sing and play in do re mi language.  They told her they learnt that when very young.   She thinks in note letter name and found it hard to convert over.


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#5 soccermom

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Posted 03 February 2014 - 14:14

Lovely girl.  Lucky teachers.  I  would imagine that this is unikely to be the only subject she excels in too judging by that conversation.  Anyone know which country she started off in?  DD went to a music camp in Italy and was very impressed that most of the Europeans (not the Brits though) could sight sing and play in do re mi language.  They told her they learnt that when very young.   She thinks in note letter name and found it hard to convert over.

She was in England when she was five. I don't know before that.


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#6 Cyrilla

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Posted 03 February 2014 - 17:34

She lives in Dorking, I believe.


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#7 Roseau

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Posted 03 February 2014 - 20:38

 

DD went to a music camp in Italy and was very impressed that most of the Europeans (not the Brits though) could sight sing and play in do re mi language.  They told her they learnt that when very young.   She thinks in note letter name and found it hard to convert over.

It's unlikely it was "do ray mi" language in the Kodaly sense. All of Southern Europe uses these names instead of letter names, so "do" is always "C" and not the tonic of any scale. Singing "do sol ray," for example, is the same as singing "C, G, D".

It is confusing having to constantly convert from one system to another but no more so than (for example)translating bar numbers.
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#8 Viledin4u

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Posted 03 February 2014 - 21:49

She seems like a naturally talented and gifted young girl, no matter who she is compared with, and very grounded. I like the way that she looks so natural when she performs rather than over dramatic like some young 'designated' prodigies.

 

I find her interesting.

 

This could also be the start of a debate, revisiting whether some children are just more musical than others, and how musical potential can be recognised in some very young children.....


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#9 mel2

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Posted 04 September 2017 - 23:40

Watched the 'Imagine' documentary this evening about this girl.
Very clever girl, but something didn't feel right. I'd like to think she would find some kindred spirits who were nearer her own age, less impressed by her, and to experience a wider slice of life in due course. But she is still young.
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#10 SingingPython

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Posted 05 September 2017 - 07:49

I knew her a little when she was 3, when she'd just started learning violin (yes in the UK though they subsequently moved).  She had an "intensity" about her musical engagement at that age such that I have not been surprised that she has gone far.  Mind you, seeing her helped me understand how my mother has always described my younger sister (who is now a professional violinist).

 

So yes I do agree that musical potential can be seen very early in some.  How you nurture that and what opportunities you can give a child will alter the trajectory of their early years though.  I have assumed that Alma's parents have had a combination of contacts and resources that has been influential in the development of her talent.

 

I have a son who is only a little younger than Alma, who is also musically precocious and composes.  It will be fun one day if they can meet!


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#11 adultpianist

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Posted 09 September 2017 - 23:49

I wondered how many readers have come across this little girl?   I first heard of her last year when she'd written the opera and have just seen this - for anyone with half an hour to spare:

 

http://www.youtube.c...h?v=KPMiYi8btjk

 

I'd be interested to hear your thoughts/comments/observations!

 

smile.png

There was a documentary on her the other day.    As talented as she is, I find her stuck up and boring


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#12 Aquarelle

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 11:51

I didn't find her either stuck up or boring. I found her no different from any other  highly gifted child. It isn't being stuck up - it's just operating on a different plain from the average child.  gifted children are often simply made that way as they are totally focused on things other children are not. No child, in my humble opinion.is boring. I have taught an enormous number  of children over a long career and not one of them has ever bored me. Each child  is a different personality with different strengths and weaknesses and reactions.

 

This little girl is just one of the gifted. How she will develop depends on her and on her environment and opportunities.The same can be said of any child, highly gifted, average or having special needs.


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#13 mel2

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 17:59

Not boring perhaps, but a little difficult to relate to. I got the impression that she was so far in advance of other children that she probably had little interest in them, other than her sister.

A peer group is part of healthy development and socialization; all the admiring adults around her would be unlikely to offer the sort of check to the ego that most of us suffer encounter as we progress through life.

I sincerely hope she has a good, wide circle of varied friends and acquaintances nearer to her own age than was suggested by the documentary, for her own future wellbeing.

 

Edit: I wouldn't want a 'gift' that made me so much different from my peers.


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#14 jpiano

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 20:04

I found her engaging and interesting. I think there was a mention in the documentary that she did meet up with other home schooled children- which is the norm in my experience of home schooling with children of friends and acquaintances. Unfortunately the structure of the TV programme did give the impression of a solitary child surrounded by admiring adults but as I mentioned on the other thread on this, I don't think it told the complete story.


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#15 HelenVJ

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Posted 12 September 2017 - 11:30

Where is the other thread on this, jpiano? (Thanks!)


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