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Tendonitis


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#1 passacaglia2

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 07:47

I have been diagnosed with tendonitis and to be honest I've had grumbling wrist pain for years but I've always been able to 'manage it' so to speak. Now I've semi-retired and started to learn those pieces I have not had time to in the past, I find I have very painful tendons for days afterwards. Even everyday things such as picking up the teapot can be agony.

I just wondered if any one has any experience of this condition. My doctor has advised physiotherapy, also wearing a wrist brace when I'm not playing. Anti-inflammatory drugs have also been mentioned but I have not found these to be very effective in the past.

My practice organ has simulated tracker touch and is not particularly heavy but I wondered if it could contribute. Some have said a lighter touch would be worse as it puts more strain on the flexor tendons.

Any advice would be most welcome. 


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#2 porilo

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 08:16

I've also recently been diagnosed with ECU tendonitis. Painkillers and anti-inflammatories don't do very much but I have to say that Naproxen tablets do help ease the pain a little. Likewise my GP referred me to a physiotherapist who made a wrist brace for me to wear when I need it. It was amazing - she made it in my presence by cutting out a section of plastic from a large sheet, putting it into what appeared to be a microwave oven to heat it, then shaped it around my wrist and attached some pieces of velcro. She would be very good on Blue Peter! The wrist brace helps somewhat and she also gave me some exercises to do. At our last appointment she felt that I might need a couple of steroid injections into the wrist and is going to write a letter to my GP. Not really looking forward to injections because I've heard that they are very painful, but if it cures the problem then I guess I will have to have them. 


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#3 mel2

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 08:46

I've had the injection in the wrist a couple of times in the last few months to sort out my carpal tunnel problem.
The first time I had one, I went to do an hour of organ practise afterwards. Next day I was in agony with a hand I could hardly open.
Last month I had anothet injection -avoided organ/piano practise and STILL had a painful hand for the next 2 days.
It only hurt if I tried to move it, stretch it or wash my hands, and it only lasted 2 days. It was worth it for the relief of the CT symptoms, though. I haven't heard of the injections for tendonitis but would certainly try it if I had the problem.
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#4 Barry Williams

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 15:04

I have suffered from this - just once.  it came on after I had played a heavy tracker action (Walker 1878) instrument for about two years.  The pain commenced just under three weeks after I gave up playing that organ.  The specialist referred to it as 'tracker disease' and said it was a well-known problem amongst organists.

 

A terrible condition that wrecks musicians' hands is Dupuytren's Contracture.  This is caused by an abnormal deposit of Type III collagen in the palm of the hand which makes the fingers bend inwards.  Surgery is rarely successful, leaving the hands weak and it often has to be repeated in a few years' time.  Knowing that there was a strong family history of this I sought advice as soon as there was the slightest sign.  The condition was completely cured by superficial radiotherapy, which is now available on the NHS.  The really important matter is to get the treatment for Dupuytren's Contracture before the fingers start to bend inwards.

 

Barry Williams


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#5 sbhoa

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 17:03

I have suffered from this - just once.  it came on after I had played a heavy tracker action (Walker 1878) instrument for about two years.  The pain commenced just under three weeks after I gave up playing that organ.  The specialist referred to it as 'tracker disease' and said it was a well-known problem amongst organists.

 

A terrible condition that wrecks musicians' hands is Dupuytren's Contracture.  This is caused by an abnormal deposit of Type III collagen in the palm of the hand which makes the fingers bend inwards.  Surgery is rarely successful, leaving the hands weak and it often has to be repeated in a few years' time.  Knowing that there was a strong family history of this I sought advice as soon as there was the slightest sign.  The condition was completely cured by superficial radiotherapy, which is now available on the NHS.  The really important matter is to get the treatment for Dupuytren's Contracture before the fingers start to bend inwards.

 

Barry Williams

Glad I read this. I've been wondering about seeing the doctor about a small lump that appeared on my palm in February that had now started to spread.


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#6 Tenor Viol

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 22:35

A decent physio who can provide some proper suggestions of what to do. I had tendinitis in my left elbow / upper forearm about a year after I started playing cello in 2011, so about 2012. In my case some exercises which helped to stretch the muscle fibres and take the tension off the tendons worked quite well.


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#7 sbhoa

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Posted 14 September 2017 - 10:42

 

I have suffered from this - just once.  it came on after I had played a heavy tracker action (Walker 1878) instrument for about two years.  The pain commenced just under three weeks after I gave up playing that organ.  The specialist referred to it as 'tracker disease' and said it was a well-known problem amongst organists.

 

A terrible condition that wrecks musicians' hands is Dupuytren's Contracture.  This is caused by an abnormal deposit of Type III collagen in the palm of the hand which makes the fingers bend inwards.  Surgery is rarely successful, leaving the hands weak and it often has to be repeated in a few years' time.  Knowing that there was a strong family history of this I sought advice as soon as there was the slightest sign.  The condition was completely cured by superficial radiotherapy, which is now available on the NHS.  The really important matter is to get the treatment for Dupuytren's Contracture before the fingers start to bend inwards.

 

Barry Williams

Glad I read this. I've been wondering about seeing the doctor about a small lump that appeared on my palm in February that had now started to spread.

 

Seems you got lucky. 

Doctor says that is what it is but treatment is only available if it gets to the stage where it impairs movement. At that point I guess it could potentially mean impaired practice/playing for several months while waiting for appointment then treatment. No mention of radiotherapy only injection or surgery. 


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#8 Barry Williams

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Posted 16 September 2017 - 22:56

Although radiotherapy for Dupuytren's Contracture has been available on the NHS since 2010, when NICE approved it, few medical practitioners have heard of it. Even when they have, the funding is often offered until the disease has reached the stage where only surgery is possible and both radiotherapy and injections would be ineffective.

 

Although this is short-sighted and inefficient, it is but one reflection of the current state of the NHS.

 

Barry Williams


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#9 sbhoa

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Posted 17 September 2017 - 10:55

Although radiotherapy for Dupuytren's Contracture has been available on the NHS since 2010, when NICE approved it, few medical practitioners have heard of it. Even when they have, the funding is often offered until the disease has reached the stage where only surgery is possible and both radiotherapy and injections would be ineffective.

 

Although this is short-sighted and inefficient, it is but one reflection of the current state of the NHS.

 

Barry Williams

And as it appears from the stuff I've managed to get through in the last few days you can't really know if it will progress or how fast as a musician I'm thinking that anything that may stop the progression is the way to go.


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#10 Barry Williams

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Posted 18 September 2017 - 12:29

My consultant radiotherapist stated a few months ago, (in respect of a friend in a similar position to SBHOA, but who had devastating hand surgery):

 

Dear Barry, 

yes after aponeurectomy radiotherapy is just as effective as it would have been if given preop. Please tell your friend that I have many many patients who have had this type of surgery and then have had radiotherapy and have responded just as well as if they had never had surgery. Please recall Barry that the only potentially curative treatment of DD is superficial radiotherapy. Hand Surgery has no effect whatsoever on the natural progressive course of this disease. 

I gladly see your friend if this is both your wish. Best, John. 

I am sure that this does not need explaining, save that the term aponeurectomy is the most common surgery for Dupuytren's Disease.

 

Barry Williams


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