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#106 mel2

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Posted 06 January 2019 - 22:43

Too acidic to spread around the garden.
You could use it to mulch your azaleas or rhododendrons; otherwise put in your brown bin (or whatever colour your LA usesfor garden waste)
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#107 Aquarelle

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Posted 05 February 2019 - 13:42

Constant wet weather has prevented any human activity in the garden for weeks. It is all looking sadly sodden. The birds however, are doing well as I have managed to feed them between the storms and showers -  and as for the moles - I despair!


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#108 hummingbird

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Posted 12 May 2019 - 16:54

My cotoneaster is alive with bees in the evening sun - dozens and dozens and dozens of them  hurrah.gif


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#109 Aquarelle

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Posted 12 May 2019 - 21:45

That's good news hummingbird and I too have had a lot of bees. At the moment they are buzzing on the pyracantha. However  neither of my two wisterias have bloomed this year which is a shame as the bees also normally buzz round that


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#110 maggiemay

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Posted 13 May 2019 - 19:57

To my joy, I have inherited a wisteria. It is scrambling through a tree, and I can’t be sure if the root is my side of the fence or not! However I’ve never had one before, and am excited to see it in bloom.

Must trim the long growths back at the end of the summer ... it still has some of last year’s seed pods. Wonder whether the seeds would germinate?
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#111 Aquarelle

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Posted 23 May 2019 - 09:55

Urgent cutting operation in the garden this morning. Up by the gate we have a tree with red leaves which makes fruit (inedible) that look rather like cherries. I don"t know what it's called. I discovered that the weight of the fruit plus the rain had bent the branches so low that I wouldn't be able to get the car out. I had not planned on doing any gardening this morning but nature is the boss! It was quite a hefty job.


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#112 ejw21

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Posted 23 May 2019 - 11:39

To my joy, I have inherited a wisteria. It is scrambling through a tree, and I can’t be sure if the root is my side of the fence or not! However I’ve never had one before, and am excited to see it in bloom.

Must trim the long growths back at the end of the summer ... it still has some of last year’s seed pods. Wonder whether the seeds would germinate?

Hi Maggiemay, well done on the wisteria! My garden has a mature white flowering wisteria, just about to flower now. I am looking forward to it because we moved in after flowering last year. 


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#113 Pickle

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Posted 26 May 2019 - 13:58

 

maggiemay

Posted 13 May 2019 - 20:57
To my joy, I have inherited a wisteria. It is scrambling through a tree, and I can’t be sure if the root is my side of the fence or not! However I’ve never had one before, and am excited to see it in bloom.

Must trim the long growths back at the end of the summer ... it still has some of last year’s seed pods. Wonder whether the seeds would germinate?

Lucky you Maggie May! A mature wisteria in full bloom is an amazing sight.

 

It's not generally recomended to propagate wisteria from seed as they don't come "True" and can take up to 20 years to flower, often with poorer quality flowers than the parent plant. The RHS website has a good explanation;

https://www.rhs.org....profile?pid=173

 

However, they are quite easy to layer - the above link can take you explanations on how to do this for plants in general, but in my opinion is more complicated that needed for wisteria. I have had success by lowering a long whippy bit to ground level and putting a brick (or something equally heavy to keep it in contact with the ground) on a leaf node about 3 nodes back from the end. Then just leave it undisturbed for the rest of the year. About this time next year, check and see if it has produced roots. If so, sever the whip from the parent plant, give it 6 weeks or so and then dig up your new plant and pot it. Do about 5 and you should get at least 1 new plant. (If all 5 take, start a new industry!).

 

Enjoy!


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#114 Aquarelle

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Posted 24 June 2019 - 11:11

I have just taken a walk round my garden and all I can say is I have never seen it so overgrown. Large areas (and it's a very big garden) are completely out of hand and some of the grass round the edges  is taller than me.  I am going to have to get someone in to help. On the other hand I don't want to cut everything as I am sure there are little animals and birds and insects enjoying the mess. Got to find some sort of compromise. Maybe the promised heatwave will do some of the work for me. Roll on the end of term!


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#115 Norway

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Posted 24 June 2019 - 13:16

Call it a nature reserve rather than a garden. That's what I've done with mine. This comes with lots of green credentials and moral high ground, oh and less effort! smile.png


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#116 Aquarelle

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Posted 24 June 2019 - 15:16

Thanks Norway. I particularly like the "less effort"!biggrin.png


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#117 maggiemay

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Posted 24 June 2019 - 16:05

Nature reserve - I really like it. What a great idea!
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#118 Norway

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Posted 27 June 2019 - 19:17

A useful phrase (when explaining the rampant biodiversity of the lawn) might be "well of course, we can't cut it until the critically endangered sabre toothed bumble bee has completed its life cycle". smile.png


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#119 LoneM

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Posted 27 June 2019 - 19:31

Nature reserve - I really like it.

 

 Indeed - I call my approach "wildlife gardening" which comes to the same thing. smile.png


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#120 Norway

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Posted 30 June 2019 - 08:52

Bats have turned up! woot.gif My neighbour has a bat box and I have the nature reserve to provide their food source. Result! I saw a good conservation programme on TV with a good idea. Your neighbour has a tree, you have a pond, and another neighbour has a hedgehog house and so on, to provide suitable habitat for wildlife.


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