Jump to content


Photo

Recorder Thread!


  • Please log in to reply
3096 replies to this topic

#3091 Zixi

Zixi

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 100 posts
  • Member: 895683
    Joined: 08-August 16

Posted 18 June 2018 - 08:44

There's something rather fun about giant musical instruments that you have to climb a step ladder to play. 

 

rofl.gif I hope I never get obsessed with a big recorder. I know what would happen... I'd have several and we wouldn't know what to do with them. They're amazing looking things - I'm not sure I'd guess it was a musical instrument if I just glanced at one!

 

On the treble I now have 8 notes from bottom G upwards but no enharmonics! But I'm still finding balancing the thing hard work!


  • 0

#3092 anacrusis

anacrusis

    Virtuoso

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 5454 posts
  • Member: 4852
    Joined: 01-October 05
  • Edinburgh, Scotland

Posted 19 June 2018 - 01:00

21740329_10213671738209097_3764912518754


  • 0

#3093 Zixi

Zixi

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 100 posts
  • Member: 895683
    Joined: 08-August 16

Posted 19 June 2018 - 05:54

I am seriously impressed. We couldn't fit that in our cottage - our ceilings are too low! How long does it take to assemble and do you need help to put it together? My husband has just said it looks like something you see in the Tate! It's wonderful!!!


  • 0

#3094 anacrusis

anacrusis

    Virtuoso

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 5454 posts
  • Member: 4852
    Joined: 01-October 05
  • Edinburgh, Scotland

Posted 19 June 2018 - 08:59

probably about five minutes to put together, and can do it solo - there are four sections, so I assemble the bottom two in the stand, then the top two, and lift those as one piece onto the lower ones: there are a few screws to tighten, then the mouthpiece has three parts and there's a bung which goes into the head to allow condensation out. Ugly as it is, it's a very finely engineered beast, and is surprisingly easy to play - thankfully I'm quite tall, and have long fingers wink.png . Thinking about sizes which are easy or difficult - actually I find the tenor hardest - no keys and hands at full stretch. In general, the bass, great bass and contra are actually easier from that point of view, and even the sub-great bass (an octave below great bass) isn't too problematic. The sub-contra, an octave below contra, does need bigger hands, and above all huge lungs. I'm only "babysitting" this one - it belongs to the SRO, but they are letting me look after it. 


  • 0

#3095 Zixi

Zixi

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 100 posts
  • Member: 895683
    Joined: 08-August 16

Posted 20 June 2018 - 07:24

I don't think it ugly at all! It's wonderful!!! We're both seriously impressed with the sheer size of it.

 

How did you get into playing it? And what about fingering - is it different from other recorders?


  • 0

#3096 elemimele

elemimele

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 682 posts
  • Member: 895612
    Joined: 17-July 16

Posted 20 June 2018 - 09:20

personally I think the corner shelf unit is looking rather intimidated by it... smile.png

I can well imagine that lung-capacity is the limiting factor on larger recorders.


  • 1

#3097 anacrusis

anacrusis

    Virtuoso

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 5454 posts
  • Member: 4852
    Joined: 01-October 05
  • Edinburgh, Scotland

Posted 20 June 2018 - 15:48

When I joined the SRO, I could only read music for tenor and above - although I got to a modest level on piano and can read bass clef, it's a different thing altogether trying to do so on recorders - my teacher had been appalled to find that though I could do complicated things on the smaller instruments, I was both dreadful in ensemble and had this big limitation when it came to the big ones, and said she wasn't going to teach me any more diploma material til I learnt these skills! Soooo, SRO it was, and the orchestra owns a number of the big beasts and people are told they're welcome to have a go. I spent a summer teaching myself to play bass, then volunteered to try contra, as there are no new skills needed to read the music at least... and about a year later went on a course, on which another player was selling a great bass off cheaply, so ended up learning that too. Players in the SRO are actually mostly very shy about trying the big ones, so those who are willing and able tend to get landed with the job a bit - I like having the flexibility for a couple of reasons - firstly it keeps my brain working if I'm switching instruments throughout a rehearsal, and secondly if I'm playing a few different sizes it stops any one instrument getting clogged wink.png .  Fingerings are in essence the same, the different Paetzold sizes all have different arrangements though to achieve the half-hole for the left thumb, so one does have to remember which instrument one is holding for that. The only grouse I have is that the Paetzold keys are very flat, - the black spots where the fingers go are very shallow grooves, and it is incredibly easy to land on a bit of key which isn't a finger hole by mistake.... 


  • 0