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How Do You Pronounce "bach"?


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Poll: How do you pronounce "Bach"? (99 member(s) have cast votes)

How do you pronounce "Bach"?

  1. Back (14 votes [14.14%])

    Percentage of vote: 14.14%

  2. Bark (52 votes [52.53%])

    Percentage of vote: 52.53%

  3. Bok (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  4. Bawk (2 votes [2.02%])

    Percentage of vote: 2.02%

  5. Batch (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  6. Another way (31 votes [31.31%])

    Percentage of vote: 31.31%

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#1 Maizie

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Posted 20 February 2008 - 09:27

"Bach", as in J.S., C.P.E., J.C., P.D.Q., etc

I have always said it 'Back', although the 'k' there isn't as hard as a 'k', it's a bit like 'ch' in 'loch'. My husband says it 'Bark' (again with a softer k).

Wondering which - if either - was correct, I had a look at Wikipedia. It says it's pronounced 'bax', and if you look up the pronunciation for those, it's:
b-as-in-babble
a-as-in-cat-and-father
x-as-in-ch-in-loch
Well, the b and the x are fine, but to me, cat and father are different, as different as, well, back and bark!!

Further Googling led me to many sites that told me it should be Bok or Bawk, like the noise a chicken makes which is not one I heard before blink.gif

Batch is what you get if you say the ch like 'church', and apparently it's how you pronounce the flower-remedy bloke. I just put that in for completeness.

And if you have any other way of saying it, please do tell.

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#2 jm-hamilton

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Posted 20 February 2008 - 09:31

"B"

"a" as in father

"ch" as in loch - the way "ch" is pronounced in Welsh.


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#3 Guest: Miss Ross_*

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Posted 20 February 2008 - 09:34

QUOTE(jm-hamilton @ Feb 20 2008, 09:31 AM)  
"B"

"a" as in father

"ch" as in loch - the way "ch" is pronounced in Welsh.
I agree smile.gif

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#4 Cyrilla

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Posted 20 February 2008 - 09:47

QUOTE(Miss Ross @ Feb 20 2008, 09:34 AM)  

QUOTE(jm-hamilton @ Feb 20 2008, 09:31 AM)  
"B"

"a" as in father

"ch" as in loch - the way "ch" is pronounced in Welsh.
I agree smile.gif


agree.gif

It's how my choir conductor pronounces it (with a very soft 'ch') so I would tend to agree with him, as he's German!

smile.gif

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#5 harmony2

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Posted 20 February 2008 - 10:18

QUOTE(Cyrilla @ Feb 20 2008, 09:47 AM)  

QUOTE(Miss Ross @ Feb 20 2008, 09:34 AM)  

QUOTE(jm-hamilton @ Feb 20 2008, 09:31 AM)  
"B"

"a" as in father

"ch" as in loch - the way "ch" is pronounced in Welsh.
I agree smile.gif


agree.gif

It's how my choir conductor pronounces it (with a very soft 'ch') so I would tend to agree with him, as he's German!

smile.gif


Definately! smile.gif
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#6 dorfmouse

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Posted 20 February 2008 - 11:01

QUOTE(harmony2 @ Feb 20 2008, 11:18 AM)  

QUOTE(Cyrilla @ Feb 20 2008, 09:47 AM)  

QUOTE(Miss Ross @ Feb 20 2008, 09:34 AM)  

QUOTE(jm-hamilton @ Feb 20 2008, 09:31 AM)  
"B"

"a" as in father

"ch" as in loch - the way "ch" is pronounced in Welsh.
I agree smile.gif


agree.gif

It's how my choir conductor pronounces it (with a very soft 'ch') so I would tend to agree with him, as he's German!

smile.gif


Definately! smile.gif


My tuppence worth;
Pronounciation of vowels is always variable in any language. Since living in Germany for several years, and going to choir, piano and flute, I hear that the Germans do not pronounce the "a" as in "father", but more like the "a" in "back". Making it as long as in "bark" or "father" sounds terribly English! The soft ch is correct.

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#7 barry-clari

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Posted 20 February 2008 - 11:51

QUOTE(Cyrilla @ Feb 20 2008, 09:47 AM)  

QUOTE(Miss Ross @ Feb 20 2008, 09:34 AM)  

QUOTE(jm-hamilton @ Feb 20 2008, 09:31 AM)  
"B"

"a" as in father

"ch" as in loch - the way "ch" is pronounced in Welsh.
I agree smile.gif


agree.gif

It's how my choir conductor pronounces it (with a very soft 'ch') so I would tend to agree with him, as he's German!

smile.gif


Oh good, that means I pronounce it the same way as he does! smile.gif
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#8 ad_libitum

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Posted 20 February 2008 - 12:05

I pronouce it "Back" with the "Loch" ending.

Then it depends on your accent too. I'm from Northern Ireland. When I say it the "a" is short. "Bark" - with a drawn out "a" sound would probably be more typical of someone with an English accent.
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#9 Maizie

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Posted 20 February 2008 - 15:41

Thanks all, glad to know there are different opinions

QUOTE(Mezzo1974 @ Feb 20 2008, 12:27 PM)  
there is absolutely no doubt about the pronounciation of the "ch" - it is definitely the "Loch" version, not a "k", and that's not a matter of taste.

Yes, I put 'back' and 'bark' up as options but meant both of them as the loch-ch-type-K biggrin.gif Because otherwise you end up with bach and barch which would be no help whatsoever biggrin.gif


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#10 ffliwt

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Posted 20 February 2008 - 15:58

The same way as the Welsh word Bach is pronounced - meaning 'small' laugh.gif
B-ah-ch (the Welsh ch... like you all said - like in loch)
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#11 Wobby

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Posted 20 February 2008 - 18:15

Well, I just call him 'Bach' as in 'Back' with a short 'a'. I do know that you should pronounce it with a 'ch' as in 'loch', but I would normally just stick to keeping everything with an English accent unless in the country or if the person were being directly addressed (and expressed distate to the 'mispronunciation'). Then again, I pronounce 'loch' like 'lock' anyway, even though I can do the 'ch' sound!

For example, I would not expect a Russian to necessarily pronounce the j's of my name properly, just as if I had a pronounced 'h' sound in my name, I would not expect a French or Italian to be able to pronounce that either, or 'w' for Germans. Besides, I wouldn't mind a foreign pronunciation of my name - it makes it sound more interesting than it actually is. smile.gif

Then again, I recognise that on the news, they tend to try their best pronounciations of certain names occassionally! tongue.gif

~Wobby~
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#12 Rosemary7391

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Posted 20 February 2008 - 18:16

I think it is nice to make a bit of an effort to pronounce names properly - as Mezzo said, if it isn't then its not your name! I'm lucky in that my name is pretty unpronouncable in English, so people stick to the proper way of saying it. Spelling it....

I agree with the German people here, which is a good thing as I'm doing a presentation on Bach for my A level German laugh.gif
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#13 hello_cello

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Posted 20 February 2008 - 18:23

i would Bark, with a soft Ch at the the end
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#14 primrose

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Posted 20 February 2008 - 18:27

QUOTE(Mezzo1974 @ Feb 20 2008, 12:27 PM)  

there is absolutely no doubt about the pronounciation of the "ch" - it is definitely the "Loch" version, not a "k", and that's not a matter of taste.
To take up rosfrog's point, would you say that the correct pronunciation of "Paris" is "Paree" (with rolled r of course), and that's not a matter of taste? Is it different as between names of people and of places? I think it would sound fairly pretentious if an English speaker tried to pronounce "Beethoven" as Beethoven would have pronounced it (whatever that may be - I believe it's actually a Dutch name). But perhaps there is a difference between the household names and lesser mortals? It doesn't seem all that pretentious to try and pronounce Dohnanyi or Donizetti the way they would have. Bach is certainly a household name, but on the other hand it's easy enough to say "ch" as in "loch", so one doesn't sound pretentious by doing so. At least, I hope not.

My own first name is French. Hardly anyone pronounces it the way a French person would, and it has never bothered me that they don't. Why should they?
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#15 Wobby

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Posted 20 February 2008 - 18:27

I guess it could be deemed polite - it's just I think it would be a bit strange if I went to a foreign country, and they were speaking in their native tongue, and then suddenly a perfectly eloquated British English version of my name emerges. Using Harry Potter as an example, in France, they would be likely to pronounce Harry's name 'Arry', like the students do, and we tend to pronounce 'Voldemort' with a hard 't', although the French pronunuciation was the one intended... smile.gif

A quick question then - I happened to hear of somebody in America called 'Craig', but because of the American pronunciation, it sounds more like 'Kreg'. Which would be best - to call him 'Kreg' or 'Craig' in an British English accent (or to put on a phoney American accent)? laugh.gif

~Wobby~
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