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How Far Would You Move


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#196 Aeolienne

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Posted 17 September 2017 - 21:40

 

As for a possible thyroid problem - I had a medical check-up earlier this year and I appeared to have low blood pressure, but when I returned for a follow-up appointment my blood pressure reading was normal, so that was that. I did get referred to mental health services for showing symptoms of anxiety, but so far all I've had from them is a prescription for anti-depressants and two brief sessions with a shrink. The second session was back in June, after which the analyst was moved to another role, and I've had to wait until now to be given another appointment (for next week). 

To eliminate hypothyroidism you have to have a blood test. Unless your GP is a bright spark he may not know much about it. Even the lipid consultant I saw at St Thomas Hospital missed it, he tried to treat a symptom (high cholesterol) not the cause.

 

http://www.thyroiduk...thyroidism.html

 

At the moment it's been hard enough getting the doctor to call me back (or at least when I'm available to take the call), let alone make an appointment.


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#197 barry-clari

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Posted 18 September 2017 - 09:01

For the record, I'm not a recent graduate (I'm over 40). I have sometimes interviewed for stopgap jobs, but in most cases the interviewer called my bluff and demanded to know if I'm planning to leave as soon as something better comes up.


Of course they'll do that. You are at liberty to withhold that information though. It got me a retail job which kept a salary coming in while I built my music/teaching career up.
 

I did actually receive a provisional job offer for a junior developer role with a civil service department in Coventry back in May. They are still carrying out background checks. TBH I secretly hope that I could land another job, as I'm concerned that the civil service job is both poorly paid (less than my last role, which in turn was less than a graduate entrant) and offers no outlet for my environmental interests. However I'm still struggling worse than ever despite (or because) having spent so much of the last eight years looking for work. 


Assuming you get through the background checks, my advice would be to take this. Who knows where it will take you?
Far better than continuously lamenting the lack of jobs you have.
Forget the environmental stuff as well for this particular purpose. Personally, I'd teach a load of five and six year olds recorder (certainly not my favourite thing in the world!) if it meant I'd get a bit of extra food on the table.
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#198 polkadot

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Posted 18 September 2017 - 18:03

For the record, I'm not a recent graduate (I'm over 40). I have sometimes interviewed for stopgap jobs, but in most cases the interviewer called my bluff and demanded to know if I'm planning to leave as soon as something better comes up.

 Most employers would naturally assume that people would always be looking to improve their prospects.  This isn't always the case.  Some people are more than happy to stay in a lesser-paid job or less demanding job because they don't want the pressure of a more responsible job, or because it's convenient hours, or close to home, or whatever.  You just have to convince the interviewer that you're one of these people.  Many years ago I was in a job that was very well paid but I had become very unhappy there.  I looked into loads of other jobs but none of them were as well paid as the job I was in, so I was stuck.  Eventually I decided that I would have to take a less well paid job just to get out.  My prospective new employer couldn't believe that I would be happy to take a drop, but I managed to convince them.  I ended up getting promoted to be a director of that company and then later setting up my own business as a result of what I'd learnt there.  You really don't know where things are going to lead.  They may not, but you'll never know if you don't give it a try.


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#199 Aeolienne

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Posted 26 November 2017 - 22:44

After over five months of waiting for security clearance, I finally started the civil service job on 30 October. Shortly before the start date I was invited to three interviews for jobs in the energy sector, which I accepted, but none led any further.

 

Despite (or maybe because of) the long wait, my manager doesn't seem to have that much of a work plan for me. So far all I've done is a few exercises in SQL. I have no idea how soon I'll have a definite accomplishment to put on my CV which I could then use to get another job. Obviously it wouldn't be appropriate to ask.

 

Seven years after I moved out of my Exeter flat I'm no nearer to resolving my housing situation. My mother thinks I should do nothing, viz. continue to let out the Exeter flat whilst renting a flat in Leamington Spa and commuting to Coventry, on the grounds that the former is an asset that's bound to go up in value. But what if Exeter property prices don't rise at the same rate as Warks/Coventry ones?

 

Apparently Derby has the highest average workplace salary outside of London (at least according to this local rag), but the property prices are so much lower than around here. If only I could move there. Or even Swindon, which I once heard has the most favourable ratio of property prices to average income.


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#200 Vicky Violin

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Posted 27 November 2017 - 10:24

Congratulations on the new job Aeolienne!  Glad to hear you are back in work!

 

I wouldn't worry too much having a work plan or getting CV points just yet - you've only been there less than a month so it will take some time to settle in.  Having said that, it's great that there's no definite work plan - it means you will have some scope to define your own role - something that is expected more and more these days.  If I were you I'd take a proactive approach - start by asking your manager how you can best support him / her and the department.  If your manager doesn't have tasks to allocate to you just yet, are there any other colleagues you can help out in the meantime?  If you're quiet at the moment, I'd make the most of this time to start building internal relationships both within your team and outside it.  Invite colleagues for coffee / lunch to get to know them and find out more about how your role sits within the wider organisation.  These relationships will be invaluable when you get busier.

 

Not sure I'd worry too much about housing at this stage.  It probably makes sense to wait until you're settled in work and know you'll be somewhere long term before selling the Exeter flat.

 

Best of luck!!!


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