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Pedants' Paradise


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#3166 Aeolienne

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Posted 20 July 2018 - 14:57



My pet peeves on another forum today are your/ you're and incorrect use of apostrophe's wink.png

In the past few days I've encountered a TEDx speaker who styles himself "Paul Isaac's", I've received an office newsletter containing "who's" instead of "whose" and I've been informed that "The future king turn's five on Sunday and a new coin is being launched to mark the celebration"!!


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#3167 Cyrilla

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Posted 20 July 2018 - 22:37

I had a mail recently about a 'Trainer's Conference'.

 

It wouldn't have been so bad if it hadn't been a company specialising in phonics and grammar materials...

 

rolleyes.gif


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#3168 elemimele

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Posted 21 July 2018 - 16:49

it's so true: when punctuationary duty's to be done (to be done...) an apostrophe's lot is not an 'appy one (appy one)


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#3169 mel2

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Posted 24 July 2018 - 13:10

My pet peeve at the moment is when people say: "you need to x", when what they really mean is "I need you to/ I would like you to x".(Or even just "please will you x....".
In my mind, it is a form of bullying to put the imperative on the other person. Also, it is an(other)insidious Americanism
that has crept in to the vernacular.
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#3170 andante_in_c

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Posted 24 July 2018 - 20:00

My pet peeve at the moment is when people say: "you need to x", when what they really mean is "I need you to/ I would like you to x".(Or even just "please will you x....".
In my mind, it is a form of bullying to put the imperative on the other person. Also, it is an(other)insidious Americanism
that has crept in to the vernacular.

My mother-in-law often precedes advice with "What you want to do is...". I so would like to reply "No, I don't", but I'm a polite soul with a well-bitten tongue. rolleyes.gif


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#3171 elemimele

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Posted 24 July 2018 - 21:32

As a general rule, I carefully avoid any talk described as a TED talk. If someone has something useful to say, they don't need the TED prefix to add artificial weight.

The sad thing about "you need to.." and "what you want to do is..." is that these two constructions have perfectly appropriate roles, which are weakened by their over-use and misuse. "The railway station? You took the wrong turning at the last junction; you need to go back and turn right"; "He's abusing you and damaging your children. You need to get him out of your life"; "You're looking for a vacuum cleaner that really sucks? What you want is a …."


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#3172 Aeolienne

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Posted 24 July 2018 - 23:22

My pet peeve at the moment is when people say: "you need to x", when what they really mean is "I need you to/ I would like you to x".(Or even just "please will you x....".
In my mind, it is a form of bullying to put the imperative on the other person. Also, it is an(other)insidious Americanism
that has crept in to the vernacular.

Mind you, "I'm going to need you to..." isn't that much better.


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#3173 mel2

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Posted 25 July 2018 - 09:27

My pet peeve at the moment is when people say: "you need to x", when what they really mean is "I need you to/ I would like you to x".(Or even just "please will you x....".
In my mind, it is a form of bullying to put the imperative on the other person. Also, it is an(other)insidious Americanism
that has crept in to the vernacular.

Mind you, "I'm going to need you to..." isn't that much better.

At least in the example here the speaker was honest about who was doing the needing.
I probably wasn't clear enough.
I meant something more akin to: "I want you to run me home -you need to get over here now!" or similar injunctions where the speaker is clearly the one 'in need', but frames what should be a plea into a command in order to inject a note of urgency.
I never heard it until quite recent years and nowadays it is in quite common usage. I can't decide whether it is the hectoring tone with which it is normally used, or the implication of (false) jeopardy that grates on me most.

Elemimele's and andante's examples have been around much longer, but I'm sure can be very irritating.
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#3174 hummingbird

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Posted 10 August 2018 - 12:30

Don't you just love this father's response to a letter he received from the Head of Education in Devon, particularly the "touché" against "Ensure you read this notice carefully" laugh.png   The faults have been blamed on a new printing system but I can't think what sort of printing system could be guitly [sic] of transposing letters.  There are at least a couple of unmarked grammatical errors in the letter as well.

 

https://www.bbc.co.u...-devon-45136508


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#3175 Banjogirl

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Posted 11 August 2018 - 11:19

The council's excuse is a lie, plain and simple. It's the modern way, it seems.
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#3176 elemimele

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Posted 11 August 2018 - 18:24

There are two things I find inordinately sad about that letter. The first is that someone paid by the public believes that it is acceptable to lie (about the cause of the typos). I was brought up to believe lying was wrong. It was something of a corner-stone of morality in every school I attended. Has that changed? In fact, it's also somewhat sad that a person responsible for education of the public thinks the public are sufficiently stupid for the lie to go unchallenged.

The second is that we now have a system that doesn't work: those who care more about cheap holidays abroad than keeping their kids in school can do the arithmetic: the price difference between foreign travel during term time and travel during holiday periods is almost certain to be greater than £60. So why not just pay the fine and bog off on holiday anyway?


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#3177 Edwardo

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Posted 13 August 2018 - 10:48

As a general rule, I carefully avoid any talk described as a TED talk. If someone has something useful to say, they don't need the TED prefix to add artificial weight.

 

In case you didn't know, TED talks are specific to the TED organization; and given under the auspices of TED.  Sir Ken Robinson's lectures (this is my favourite) are themselves worth you putting aside your prejudice.


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#3178 Cyrilla

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Posted 31 August 2018 - 22:17

Bagpuss tells me she read today of some people at a wedding 'sitting on hay bails'.


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