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Don't understand model answer

theory grade 6 harmonization

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#1 brahmslover

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Posted 12 December 2016 - 18:15

20161212_165751_zps1mf1kupu.jpg

 

Please would anyone explain this to me?  I'm trying to understand how they got to this model answer for a harmonization question.  I'm looking at the part in the attached snapshot, where they have suggested Ic to Va.  The melody is in grey and they have suggested the black notes.  However, are there not consecutive octaves between the Fs in the bass and the Fs in the alto part?  Or do consecutives only mean consecutives between the bass part and the melody?


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#2 sbhoa

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Posted 12 December 2016 - 18:20

My understanding is that they are consecutive octaves if the notes move.

Otherwise it does mean consecutives between any two parts.

To be honest I wouldn't even attempt writing notes on the stave for this question as it does add this sort of problem.

I would write the chords rather than the notes. That is if I've got it right that you can choose?


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#3 brahmslover

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Posted 12 December 2016 - 19:04

Yes, you can choose whether to write the Roman numerals or the notes, but they have written both for the model answer (you are only allowed to do one or the other in the exam I think).

 

So to clarify - you are saying that if 2 parts have notes an octave apart, and then an octave apart again, but they are the SAME notes and haven't moved, then that is NOT consecutive octaves and doesn't break the consecutive octaves rule?

 

I was thinking I would try to tackle the question by writing the notes because - the thing about trying to get contrary motion in being a good thing - doesn't that mean in the middle parts, and keeping the middle parts' notes close together, but the bass part's notes can be further apart?


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#4 Spanish Pavane

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Posted 12 December 2016 - 19:16

Consecutive octaves are those that move.  These don't, they're repeated notes.

Yes, no more than an octave between any of the top three parts but the distance between tenor and bass can be anything.


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#5 brahmslover

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Posted 12 December 2016 - 19:23

Thank you sbhoa and Spanish Pavane.  Any thoughts on is it best to write the notes in to help with getting contrary motion in the middle parts, or to help decide what inversion to use by how to get the middle parts closest together?


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#6 sbhoa

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Posted 12 December 2016 - 20:20

Thank you sbhoa and Spanish Pavane.  Any thoughts on is it best to write the notes in to help with getting contrary motion in the middle parts, or to help decide what inversion to use by how to get the middle parts closest together?

The trick to getting that contrary motion and good use of inversions is to learn some common chord progressions instead of thinking a note at a time.

For example iib IC V (or V7) I is a common approach for a perfect cadence. Another useful one to learn how to use is the passing 6/4.

Get a couple of progressions in the appropriate places and there's usually only a few notes left to harmonise.

I found that keyboard harmony helped with that.


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#7 Tenor Viol

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Posted 12 December 2016 - 22:02

Parallel octaves/fifths is the term I was taught.


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