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Query on lesson cancellations and contracts


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#46 polkadot

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Posted 20 May 2017 - 14:15

I'm sorry you've had a couple of bad experiences with your teachers, hopefully it will be third time lucky.

 

There are often things that my teacher wants me to do in my lesson that I can't get the hang of straight away.  If I know what needs doing but I just can't do it, I sometimes say (after trying several times) "I can't do this yet, but I'll practise it at home and I'll be able to do it eventually".  The "Yet" makes it more positive than the show-stopping "I can't do it", end of.  On the other hand, if the reason I can't do it is because I haven't grasped how it should be done, then I ask my teacher to explain or show me again.  Saying I'll be able to do it after I've practised it at home also enables us to move on to some other productive learning in the lesson, and usually the problem is something that I do learn how to overcome, either by the following week or over a period of time.  Perhaps you could try using the "Yet" word with your next teacher to forestall any further problem on that front :)

 


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#47 corenfa

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Posted 20 May 2017 - 14:39

That's what I do with mine- I say, I know what I need to practise but I cannot do it right this moment. I do sometimes have to remind that I've worked most of a full week before my lesson and sometimes that means my brains just aren't at full capacity.
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#48 JD5

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Posted 20 May 2017 - 17:52

That's quite good advice, Polkadot.  Thanks


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#49 linda.ff

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Posted 22 May 2017 - 12:43

I'm sorry you've had a couple of bad experiences with your teachers, hopefully it will be third time lucky.

 

There are often things that my teacher wants me to do in my lesson that I can't get the hang of straight away.  If I know what needs doing but I just can't do it, I sometimes say (after trying several times) "I can't do this yet, but I'll practise it at home and I'll be able to do it eventually".  The "Yet" makes it more positive than the show-stopping "I can't do it", end of.  On the other hand, if the reason I can't do it is because I haven't grasped how it should be done, then I ask my teacher to explain or show me again.  Saying I'll be able to do it after I've practised it at home also enables us to move on to some other productive learning in the lesson, and usually the problem is something that I do learn how to overcome, either by the following week or over a period of time.  Perhaps you could try using the "Yet" word with your next teacher to forestall any further problem on that front :)

Oh, yes, "yet"!

 

I always tell them I won't accept "can't" without that extra little word. Begins with Y. I've had a couple of offbeat suggestions, like "yesterday?" and "you".

 

Difficult things are just things you can't do. Yet.

 

My ex was Brain of Britain in 1984, and people kept saying how clever he was to answer "all those difficult questions". To which he modestly replied "I didn't answer any difficult questions.  They're the ones you don't know the answers to, so the ones I got right were easy". But to his extreme embarrassment he failed to identify Warlock's Capriol Suite, which he did know.


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#50 BadStrad

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Posted 22 May 2017 - 12:50

My ex was Brain of Britain in 1984, and people kept saying how clever he was to answer "all those difficult questions".

It is a source of irritation to me that people say questions based on knowing a fact are difficult. Obviously if a person has memory issues then storing and recalling facts would be difficult, but otherwise it is just remembering stuff. In my books difficult questions are the ones where you have to work out something (eg a relationship between some pieces of information). Of course those questions sometimes require some recall to make the connections.
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#51 jpiano

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Posted 22 May 2017 - 21:36

 

My ex was Brain of Britain in 1984, and people kept saying how clever he was to answer "all those difficult questions".

It is a source of irritation to me that people say questions based on knowing a fact are difficult. Obviously if a person has memory issues then storing and recalling facts would be difficult, but otherwise it is just remembering stuff. In my books difficult questions are the ones where you have to work out something (eg a relationship between some pieces of information). Of course those questions sometimes require some recall to make the connections.

 

Yes, I agree. What really annoys me is how far education is going back down the memorising of facts learning rather than the questioning and application of knowledge which is what we as individuals and as a country (esp in these times) reallly need. So GCSE English candidates are memorising far more quotations than I had to do for my English degree. Likewise the endless scale permutations for ABRSM higher grades (some of which I don't think you'd find in a piece of music as they sound horrid) can turn the whole thing into a memory test for some.


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#52 JD5

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Posted 23 May 2017 - 09:34

Likewise the endless scale permutations for ABRSM higher grades (some of which I don't think you'd find in a piece of music as they sound horrid) can turn the whole thing into a memory test for some.

 

Probably one good reason for doing Trinity


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#53 HelenVJ

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Posted 23 May 2017 - 11:14

One of many.

( Would some kind person manage to explain, in words of one syllable, how do get the quotes to work? I still can't hack it :(.)


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#54 JD5

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Posted 23 May 2017 - 11:45

One of many.

( Would some kind person manage to explain, in words of one syllable, how do get the quotes to work? I still can't hack it :(.)

HelenVJ:  You click the "Quote" button and the edit screen appears with the quote in - then just type below it.  Or are the talking about the quote format made by me above ?


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#55 HelenVJ

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Posted 23 May 2017 - 12:36

Thanks, JD5 - but how and where would I find this edit screen? I just get the normal blank one, and clicking on the quote has no effect whatsoever. :(


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#56 Maizie

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Posted 23 May 2017 - 12:42

It may depend on your browser - when I am at work (where I am stuck with Internet Explorer 11) - the quote function and pasting in anything I've copied (whether from the browser or any other program) simply don't work...


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#57 JD5

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Posted 23 May 2017 - 14:21

I expect that's the answer - the browser.  Google Chrome works fine.


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