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Moving from house calls to home


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#1 szteff

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Posted 09 August 2017 - 14:25

I need some advice, I have a plan to move my teaching away from housecalls which I am finding too much, to basing my work at home.

I currently do house calls on a Monday, Tuesday and Thursday. 

I want to drop my Wednesday and Thursdays but not sure how to do it diplomatically.

 

Would you suggest I offer the Tuesday housecall slots to my advanced students and those doing exams or would that be viewed as unfair?

 

Any advice would be great as I struggle with this side of things

 

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#2 Latin pianist

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Posted 09 August 2017 - 14:44

I would say to all your students that you are aiming to do all your teaching at home. Hopefully most Will be fine with this and if there are any cases where people would genuinely struggle to get to you, you could offer them Tuesday slots.When these students stop learning, tell any new ones that you only teach from home.I'm a bit confused from your post as to what days you do teach. Will you be offering a reduction in fees if you don't have travel expenses?
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#3 Brynfan

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Posted 09 August 2017 - 18:25

I did this just over 3 years ago.  I worked Monday to Friday evenings and also Saturday mornings doing house calls.  Apart from a few elderly people who I visited during the day, everybody started coming to me.  I didn't give them an option.  I did this just after Easter and did lose around 8 pupils by the end of the summer term who I managed to replace quickly enough. The majority of my pupils at the time were below grade 2 standard, and I think I would have lost most of them eventually anyway, but having to come to me made them think about their commitment to continuing lessons.

 

I didn't reduce my fees but didn't increase them for 2 years either.

 

I built an extension to teach from and most pupils and their parents knew what was happening for almost a year before I started working from home.  I'd suggest giving plenty of notice of your intention to be home based.

 

Overall, it's much better for me.  I have more teaching time (no travel time between lessons - travelling 1 mile in my town can often take 10-15 minutes) and I'm much less tired by the end of the evening.


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#4 szteff

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Posted 09 August 2017 - 19:48

Thanks for that. I tend to keep students for years up to A-levels so it will mean losing a few as I travel 40 minutes to the area where I do housecalls. I'm just finding it too tiring so I think I will take the risk over the next year or so and see what happens


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#5 jpiano

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Posted 09 August 2017 - 20:33

I had a similar situation the other way round if that makes sense as I wasn't able to continue to rent a room in the place where I'd been teaching around 30 pupils so I offered the option of them coming to me or me going to them. I lost probably about 8 or so and kept the rest-for me the key thing was giving them plenty of notice of the change and it's the same I think for you  with your switch the other way round. I've now managed to make the change from home visits to them almost all coming to me now, but I did that gradually over time as people left and I replaced them with pupils coming to me. The good thing is that although you'll probably lose a few, the extra time gained will mean you can take more people on to replace them.


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#6 dumdidum

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Posted 10 August 2017 - 10:40

My piano teacher did this to me after about a year of home visits and I was delighted! It is much more convenient for me to travel to her (so me and family not hanging around at home if she was a few minutes late which she often was, plus no compulsion to have a quick tidy up etc). In fact I was surprised when I had first contacted her that she did home visits, as I had presumed I would be travelling to her.

I think she lost a few pupils but gained others so swings and roundabouts....


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#7 szteff

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 14:36

Thanks for the advice :)


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#8 Sautillé

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 17:50

Definitely try to stress the benefits of teaching in your own home.... I do make a couple of visits for two families with multiple young children but I generally don't visit. My piano is reliable, all my resources are around me and I can plan and lay things out efficiently. My photocopier is on the next room and I've got spares of everything. I can quickly pull out a piece/study/scale grid/different sightreading resource and I don't have to be distracted by other people's grandparents/dogs/kids fighting over the Xbox etc etc. I'm also on my own wifi for online resources. The two families I visit are special circumstances and I enjoy both of them but I spend a lot of time getting things together and sometimes my 10 minute drive can be 15/20/25 minutes which comes out of my free time. I also think that there's a professional 'ring fence' when I teach at home that reinforces the fact that I take it seriously and my music room is my classroom. I do understand not everybody has the resources to be able to teach at home so visiting is obviously better for some but I would have to be really pursuaded to go down that route....
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