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Most common 2-5-1 progressions in minor keys.


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#1 Happyhacker

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Posted 02 September 2017 - 18:42

I have seen that in major keys the most used or common ones are C Eb F G Bb. What are they in minor keys? Thanks.

I'm also looking for a practice sheet for progressions ( at least the common types e.g. 6-2-5-1) and have one for root positions in minor and major all keys but that I understand is not the whole story. Any pointers appreciated.
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#2 Kai-Lei

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Posted 03 September 2017 - 21:21

I have seen that in major keys the most used or common ones are C Eb F G Bb. What are they in minor keys? Thanks.

I'm not quite sure what you mean here - are these key chords and how do you relate them in a progression. Like for example
If the first chord is C major, the next chord would be E? major, next F major....does this assume a key of C major?

It makes an interesting progression if not overused.
C B? A G
G G  F D
E E? C B?
C E? F G
It's something that interests me because though I don't play jazz I play cocktail style and tend to get chromatic
with non-harmony notes, 9ths 11th etc.

 

I'm also looking for a practice sheet for progressions ( at least the common types e.g. 6-2-5-1)
and have one for root positions in minor and major all keys but that I understand is not the whole story.
Any pointers appreciated.

Again, a progression based on these chords VI-II-V-1 works fine in minor keys and best to write out
a few variations to try out then try improvisations over the top. Remember that in the minor the basic II
triad is a diminished 5th (the 7th would be the key note: in C minor it would be D-F-A?-C which makes it
a very useful approach to V7 or V7/9).

As it happens the II-V is useful to modulate to the relative minor from a major key, the II and V in the
minor key.

As time goes by:
https://soundcloud.c...-time-goes-by-1

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#3 Happyhacker

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Posted 03 September 2017 - 22:11

Ah! I have misled here. They are major keys I read that are most commonly used (in Jazz?). So wondered what the most common minor keys are. I guess it's down to knowing all the standards and what keys they are in. Was thinking of which scales and therefore chord progressions to concentrate on in practice. Haven't thought about which Blues or pentatonic scales to concentrate on. Still trying to get to grips with some of the basics here and find the theory books tend to get a bit heavy once the scales and basic chords are explained. Perhaps a few more years of practice...!


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#4 Kai-Lei

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Posted 04 September 2017 - 06:37

I DON'T KNOW WHY BUT THE SITE IS CHANGING ALL MY FLAT AND NATURAL SIGNS TO QUESTION MARKS. I'M HAVING TO SUBSTITUTE b for a flat and nat for natural. Sorry about that. Surprising that on a technical music site it can't reproduce these signs.

 

If you're talking about keyboards I'm guessing the most frequent I've encountered are C, Bb and Eb for jazz accompaniment as clarinets and saxes are transposing instruments. Clarinet and one range of saxes sound B? when they're actually playing (to them) a C, some saxes (e.g. alto) sound Eb when playing C, so you for instance play in Bb while the clarinetists use fingerings for their C. - C G and F are useful for singers. So, right, you've chosen a useful set of keys.

 

I can't know how far you're into instrumentation but this is by design so woodwind and sax players have standardised fingering for their instruments which can exist in different forms - clarinets come most usually in A and Bb; saxes in Eb and Bb (Soprano = Bb, Alto = Eb, Tenor = Bb, Baritone - Eb etc). Sure you see some clarinets in C, some in high Eb but these are rarely seen outside the orchestra.

 

Just as an aside, years ago I had to accompany on a piano so neglected that it was permanently tuned down half a tone. I had to learn pretty quick to transpose up half a tone on the fly - for a Bb clarinettist I had to play in Db major. Point is, it was knowing the progressions that was such a help. 

 

Minor keys I'd go for A C D E F and G minor.as common keys.


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#5 Happyhacker

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Posted 04 September 2017 - 07:33

Kai-Lei, For character set I guess the editor features are not all enabled for whatever editor type they are using. Might be worth mailing the web dept. to investigate this.

 

Many thanks for the heads up there. Not into instruments at this stage just keyboard. I will add those minor keys to my scale and chord practice sessions.

 

Still looking for ideas for chord progression practice with typical (Jazz) voicings other than closed although root in the base is an obvious one.


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#6 jazzrob

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Posted 12 September 2017 - 13:16

Happy hacker, from a non pianist's point of view, the minor side of things is one of the few times that I encourage the use of scales. (apart from the be bop scale).

 

If you take Gmin as the target chord, treat it as G harmonic min. The notes are G A Bb C D Eb F# G

The V7 chord is D7. Use the notes from G harmonic minor but starting on the D gives you great improv material. D Eb F# G A Bb C D.

Most notable is the b9 extension that occurs from that (D7b9). The Bb also gives you a b13. So fool around a bit going from V7 - I in whatever key you're looking at. ("Song for my father" is a good one. Also the min II V's in "Autumn Leaves").

 

So in summary, use the notes from the target (min) scale over the V7 chord.

(You can pretty much approach the IIm7(b5) chord preceding the V7 chord the same way. e.g. Am7b5  D7b9  Gm. )

It's just a matter of trial and error which combinations of notes work best.

 

Hope this was related to your query. Pleased to help if I have anything to offer on this.

 

PS, I'm assuming that you're not that far along your improv journey yet? If that's the case, I'd really recommend leaving the pentatonic side of things for a while.

Lock in the basics for a while.

 

Rob


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