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#31 Thepianist

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Posted 22 January 2018 - 21:46

But then what happens when the grades are finished? A lot of people stop after grade 8 as I've heard the jump from 8 to dip is huge.
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#32 corenfa

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Posted 22 January 2018 - 22:46

But then what happens when the grades are finished? A lot of people stop after grade 8 as I've heard the jump from 8 to dip is huge.


Hopefully by then, like me, they learn that they have the ability to learn and play quite a lot of stuff at least approximately.

I'm working towards a diploma, but it will have been decades since my grade 8 by the time I get it, if things go to plan.
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#33 Thepianist

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Posted 23 January 2018 - 03:46

How long have you been studying the diploma? Do you have any examples of the pieces you are planning on playing? I think that's what I'm going to do after my grade 8 exam.
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#34 EllieD

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Posted 23 January 2018 - 08:33

I think they mean after an exam you learn new material until the teacher feels you could learn the exam pieces in 3 months. That could well be after a year.

 

Presumably though, a student somewhere between Grades 7 and 8 would be expected to be practicing for more hours per day / week than, say, a beginner or someone between Grade 1 and 2? That's why I was thinking in terms of hours per piece, really.

I assume someone at the higher levels is likely to be practicing for more than an hour a day - is that the expectation?


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#35 Thepianist

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Posted 23 January 2018 - 09:35

Yes I think so, that's the idea.
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#36 elemimele

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Posted 23 January 2018 - 11:19

EllieD, you wrote that you are looking for pieces for piano, recorder, classical guitar and saxophone. If you're serious about this, all is not lost! If you look at early music, you will find that mixed ensembles were very common: harpsichord and lute were common instruments for providing the texture of an accompaniment (here's looking to you, classical guitar and piano); recorder, bassoon, oboe, flute (and of course violin and voice) offer the solo line (recorder, saxophone...). The only thing you're really missing is a cellist to reinforce the bass! I'm certain a lot of this ensemble stuff could be rearranged for the selection you describe. Recorder may struggle to be heard properly, and the piano player is going to have to be sensitive. The early composers were so flexible about the resources they were prepared to use, that I'd almost bet, were they alive today, someone would have written a suite for the combination you describe. They were realistic: they knew that sheet music sold best if it was written in a way that could be tackled by a wide range of well-off amateurs, whatever instrument they happened to play.

 

Exams and pieces: I'd give up out of sheer boredom if I had to play the same three pieces for six months. To be honest, I'm lazy, and have no desire to go through the hard work of learning a piece that is sufficiently hard that I have to spend a month just getting to grips with the notes, picking it apart beat by beat. For me personally, the learning experience works better if I take smaller steps, and try to learn more things, choosing things that stretch me a little less. I suppose if you look at pieces as stepping stones, rather making the journey by steeling myself for huge leaps from one stone to another at a distance, I'd rather tiptoe across a large number of stones much closer together. But we're all different.


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#37 corenfa

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Posted 23 January 2018 - 11:49

How long have you been studying the diploma? Do you have any examples of the pieces you are planning on playing? I think that's what I'm going to do after my grade 8 exam.

Since 2013. Here are my proposed programmes

ATCL:
French Suite in G - JS Bach
Menuet from Suite Bergamasque - Debussy
Sarabande from Pour le piano - Debussy
Piano Suite - Norman Dello Joio

LTCL:
Prelude and Fugue in C# from WTC book 1 - JS Bach
Sonata in A minor - Mozart
Nocturne in F op 15 no 1 - Chopin
Polonaise op 53 - Chopin
Ricercare and Toccata - Menotti

Note that at the moment, it's not a certainty by any means that I will pass. But those are my plans. I'm taking a relaxed approach as I have a non musical day job.
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#38 Thepianist

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Posted 23 January 2018 - 12:00

Ok thank you I will check those out, thank you for your reply. I always wondered too how long should one repeat something in one session? Because I don't feel you truly can actually play it even if you repeat a certain bar over and over again in one practice session. I usually find by the end of the week I can play it properly if I practice regularly.
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#39 linda.ff

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Posted 23 January 2018 - 12:03

EllieD, you wrote that you are looking for pieces for piano, recorder, classical guitar and saxophone. If you're serious about this, all is not lost! If you look at early music, you will find that mixed ensembles were very common: harpsichord and lute were common instruments for providing the texture of an accompaniment (here's looking to you, classical guitar and piano); recorder, bassoon, oboe, flute (and of course violin and voice) offer the solo line (recorder, saxophone...). The only thing you're really missing is a cellist to reinforce the bass! I'm certain a lot of this ensemble stuff could be rearranged for the selection you describe. Recorder may struggle to be heard properly, and the piano player is going to have to be sensitive. The early composers were so flexible about the resources they were prepared to use, that I'd almost bet, were they alive today, someone would have written a suite for the combination you describe. They were realistic: they knew that sheet music sold best if it was written in a way that could be tackled by a wide range of well-off amateurs, whatever instrument they happened to play.

 

 

 

How about this one?

http://wikipdq.wikia...rtante,_S._98.6


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#40 corenfa

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Posted 23 January 2018 - 13:04

Ok thank you I will check those out, thank you for your reply. I always wondered too how long should one repeat something in one session? Because I don't feel you truly can actually play it even if you repeat a certain bar over and over again in one practice session. I usually find by the end of the week I can play it properly if I practice regularly.


I repeat something in one session until it is no longer improving.

Some of the items on my diploma programme, I have been working on for five years. Some of these things I still don't feel I can play. I am getting closer though.

I don't recommend doing what I did which is pick an aspirational programme and then work on it very slowly. This could be extremely discouraging for some people. However I am not easily bored, am extremely self motivated, and it provides a welcome relief from my day job, so this works for me. It might not work for everyone.
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#41 Thepianist

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Posted 23 January 2018 - 13:15

I see , yes that is the pioint when I usually stop too. Wow 5 years? That's a really long time , is that on all 6? They are all beautiful peices you are learning to play. When do you feel you will be ready to take the exam?
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#42 EllieD

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Posted 23 January 2018 - 13:15

 

EllieD, you wrote that you are looking for pieces for piano, recorder, classical guitar and saxophone. If you're serious about this, all is not lost! If you look at early music, you will find that mixed ensembles were very common: harpsichord and lute were common instruments for providing the texture of an accompaniment (here's looking to you, classical guitar and piano); recorder, bassoon, oboe, flute (and of course violin and voice) offer the solo line (recorder, saxophone...). The only thing you're really missing is a cellist to reinforce the bass! I'm certain a lot of this ensemble stuff could be rearranged for the selection you describe. Recorder may struggle to be heard properly, and the piano player is going to have to be sensitive. The early composers were so flexible about the resources they were prepared to use, that I'd almost bet, were they alive today, someone would have written a suite for the combination you describe. They were realistic: they knew that sheet music sold best if it was written in a way that could be tackled by a wide range of well-off amateurs, whatever instrument they happened to play.

 

 

 

How about this one?

http://wikipdq.wikia...rtante,_S._98.6

 

 

Perfect Linda.ff!! Brilliant combination of instruments!!

 

Actually, you are right elemimele, I think if I look into it, there will almost certainly be something that could be adapted. Though we have a range of abilities as well, so I will have to wait for a while until my littlest niece with her big saxophone catches up! It would be fun if it could be got to work!


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#43 corenfa

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Posted 23 January 2018 - 15:00

I see , yes that is the pioint when I usually stop too. Wow 5 years? That's a really long time , is that on all 6? They are all beautiful peices you are learning to play. When do you feel you will be ready to take the exam?


5 years on the Polonaise, certainly. I've been working on the other pieces for different lengths of time from a few months to 4 years.

I hope to take ATCL by early next year and LTCL a year after that. The LTCL programme had to be approved and that expires Dec 2020 so that's the hard deadline.
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#44 EllieD

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Posted 20 April 2018 - 14:12

Turns out my original question really was as vague as the famous query about string length....

 

So I've had a go at five of the Grade 5 pieces from the 2015/16 book. I always make a note of how long I spend in each practice session, and there's a huge variety! A couple of the pieces are pretty much done and dusted after about 15 hours, while the Dussek (with the Alberti bass) could still be improved after more than 50 hours! (Though I think I'm improving it beyond what would be needed for Grade 5, but anyway.) And a couple in the middle taking about 25-30 hours.

 

I guess we all have strengths and weaknesses, but I'm surprised there's such a big difference!


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