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Sometimes I feel like giving up piano once and for all


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#31 cho10

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Posted 18 March 2018 - 16:07

I practice every single day (unless I am traveling somewhere and have no access to a piano). Even then I watch piano lessons on YouTube if I have nothing else.
Timing varies from 25 minutes to 2 hours.
This has helped me enormously with sight reading and rhythm.
I appreciate that one can be tired but dreading piano practice shows a lack of enthusiasm that eventually will also show in the quality of one's playing.
I have been at this for 5 years and I want that ABRSM diploma. I only have to pass grades 4 through 8 to get there. Not easy but doable.
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#32 corenfa

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Posted 18 March 2018 - 16:30

I practice every single day (unless I am traveling somewhere and have no access to a piano). Even then I watch piano lessons on YouTube if I have nothing else.
Timing varies from 25 minutes to 2 hours.
This has helped me enormously with sight reading and rhythm.
I appreciate that one can be tired but dreading piano practice shows a lack of enthusiasm that eventually will also show in the quality of one's playing.
I have been at this for 5 years and I want that ABRSM diploma. I only have to pass grades 4 through 8 to get there. Not easy but doable.


Good for you for being so dedicated. I go through phases like that, but I also have times when I dread practise. I do not agree that it shows a lack of enthusiasm that will eventually show in the quality of my playing. A temporary lack of mojo is normal and beating myself up over this is only going to lead to feelings of guilt which are ultimately counterproductive. I spent years beating myself up over practise (differwnt instrument) and I am not putting myself through that again.

All the best with your diploma plans. I am also working towards one. Being gentle with myself when I don't feel like practising has not stopped me from progressing adequately.
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#33 Thepianist

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Posted 19 March 2018 - 06:14

I practice every single day (unless I am traveling somewhere and have no access to a piano). Even then I watch piano lessons on YouTube if I have nothing else.
Timing varies from 25 minutes to 2 hours.
This has helped me enormously with sight reading and rhythm.
I appreciate that one can be tired but dreading piano practice shows a lack of enthusiasm that eventually will also show in the quality of one's playing.
I have been at this for 5 years and I want that ABRSM diploma. I only have to pass grades 4 through 8 to get there. Not easy but doable.

Good for you for being so dedicated. I go through phases like that, but I also have times when I dread practise. I do not agree that it shows a lack of enthusiasm that will eventually show in the quality of my playing. A temporary lack of mojo is normal and beating myself up over this is only going to lead to feelings of guilt which are ultimately counterproductive. I spent years beating myself up over practise (differwnt instrument) and I am not putting myself through that again.

All the best with your diploma plans. I am also working towards one. Being gentle with myself when I don't feel like practising has not stopped me from progressing adequately.
So glad your keeping going with it you have to. Music is a great escape and outlet for creativity. I'm glad I'm not the only one that feels like this sometimes. I'm exactly the same as you, sometiems i dread it for whatever reason. I've been with a new gf now for 2 months now which has made my practice time more balanced. I think I was over practising before it's not like I'm going to be a concert pianist at my age now. Although I think my teacher sees something I don't as she wants me to be one. I was speaking to my teacher the other day about sightreading as I think mine is poor and she said a lot of people who can sight read amazingly well aren't always necessarily musical people. My teacher said you can't teach that to someone they either have it or they don't.
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#34 corenfa

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Posted 19 March 2018 - 09:32

I don't agree that sightreading is something you either have or don't. It can be studied. I used to be bad at it and now I am ok at it. Sight reading is like any other sort of reading: you need to practise it. You can clearly read English- that is because you have practised it for years. If I gave you a newspaper article you had never seen before you would be able to read it. Think of how often you spent as a child reading things. As adults we don't remember how much practise we put in for reading, but as adults it seems tedious and difficult to do that with music reading. It kind of is! But with perseverance we will develop the same sort of facility as with reading English.
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#35 Thepianist

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Posted 19 March 2018 - 11:18

No my teacher meant musically, like the gift whatever it is.
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#36 corenfa

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Posted 19 March 2018 - 11:21

No my teacher meant musically, like the gift whatever it is.


Ok, I see what you mean.
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#37 Oldragman

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Posted 23 March 2018 - 05:34

Hi all,

I posted some of what follows in another forum, but it was suggested to me to post in here also. So here goes...

I've been teaching myself piano for 3 years now. I got through a book and a half of the Carol Barratt course, which came to an end when I could no longer find the pieces being played on YouTube.

I then switched to learning City Of Stars and Leonard Cohen's Hallelujah from online piano tutorials. I have also learnt Elton John's Your Song this way and I can play all of these tunes with varying degrees of proficiency. I also bought James Rhodes book and learnt the Bach Prelude which the book centres on. The book also improved my basic understanding of musical notation. 

I am currently learning the Tom Waits song Martha from the sheet music I purchased some time ago online. It was far too difficult for me to grasp when I first read it, but as my musical knowledge is slowly improving, I now find it easier and have learnt the whole piece and am currently working on making it sound like music. 

Learning from trial and error like this is probably not the best way to learn and I am becoming increasingly aware of my limitations. However, I have started to look at music theory in more detail, particularly chords, scales and arpeggios. It was a revelation to me that the latter is simply a broken chord.

I have watched online tutorials about playing by ear and identifying the key note of a song. I have read up about all 12 major scales with diatonic triads and relative minors. 

I have been listening to Coltrane's My Little Brown Book and I can hear that this takes music to a whole other level. I have read up on modal scales and this is all very mind-blowing for a relative novice. I guess I am like a beginner trying to walk with giants but my musical curiosity is growing and at present I still can't afford a decent piano teacher. 

I have also been playing some classical, some modern and even some Boogie Woogie. I found Brendan Kavannah's lessons on YouTube and it is amazing how people respond to this rather flashy way of playing. I guess it worked wonders for Jools Holland.

I am still finding my feet musically. I practise sometimes for between 4 and 6 hours and then end up hating the pieces I'm working on and feeling like I want to go onto something else. I also get fed up with myself when after hours and hours of solid practise I still can't change chords quickly enough to play the songs as I would like to. My fingers are strengthening all the time and my wife says she can see constant improvement but I feel (at times) that I'll never be much good as a pianist. 

I empathise with you Raspberry but in my opinion, what you are missing is the love of music. You seem very serious about taking exams. I started playing piano out of a love for music and the instrument. Sure I have demotivated days, but the love of the instrument and music always draws me back. Do you feel you have that? Do you play pieces you love?


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#38 LoneM

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Posted 24 March 2018 - 21:51

Raspberry hasn't  been on the forum for for nearly two months ...


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#39 _DaVid_

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Posted 25 March 2018 - 08:19

[size=1]...I practise sometimes for between 4 and 6 hours and then end up hating the pieces I'm working on and feeling like I want to go onto something else. I also get fed up with myself when after hours and hours of solid practise I still can't change chords quickly enough to play the songs as I would like to...


You're practicing the same piece too long if that's the case, smaller chunks of time and regularly will get you results. Even though you're practising the same chord changes for hour upon hour, it doesn't just happen like that. It could take weeks depending on your current ability. Perhaps those chord changes are quite advanced and are a little ahead of where you are. Maybe there are simpler chord progressions you could drill before you work up to the Monk ones!

Sounds like you're doing fine though, nice one. Slowly slowly catchy monkey.
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