Jump to content


Photo

Case for a broad in the beam violin.

violin case recommendations

  • Please log in to reply
17 replies to this topic

#16 elemimele

elemimele

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 765 posts
  • Member: 895612
    Joined: 17-July 16

Posted 15 May 2018 - 12:43

flashiness: I'm not sure if it's the composers or the performers who are the culprits. I'm in a phase of exploring baroque repertoire at the moment, but doing it with recorder (in true early-baroque style, my attitude is a good tune is a good tune, and if your instrument can play it, anything's fair game). It's impossible to ignore the violin sonatas because there are so many, but as a learner recorder-player I'm heavily biased towards the sedate end of non-flashiness. Yes, there is an awful lot of violin repertoire that makes extreme use of its tonal range (understandable but unsuitable) and there's a lot of rather unlikeable stuff that seems to involve sawing away at a series of broken chords as ferociously as possible (potentially possible but ugly). It reminds me of the fretwork edges of old-fashioned railway-station platform roofs - a sort of endless zig-zag. Looks quite decent on a Preserved railway building...

 

I don't know if Vivaldi (and Vivaldalikes) were show-offs, or whether they wrote for show-offs. There is lyrical, beautiful violin music out there, but for every one beautiful, recorder-friendly melody I find, there are five pieces that rely on the violin's extreme range or use a lot of double-stopping, and fifteen pieces that are virtuoso railway-fretwork. Where there is demand, there is supply.

 

By the way, BadStrad, I rather like your thoughtful violin-names, which not only say something about the individual instrument, but also remind me of female figures who've contributed to our culture, past and present.


  • 0

#17 BadStrad

BadStrad

    Virtuoso

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3798 posts
  • Member: 88756
    Joined: 28-January 10

Posted 17 May 2018 - 12:27

Thank you Elemimele. I like to be thoughtful when naming things. A part of me would have liked to go with the names of women who have inspired me, such as Marie Curie, Ada Lovelace, Hedy Lamarr, or Valentina Tereskova... who each contributed something to the world we live in, but the names didn't fit the instruments.

I totally agree about any good tune being fair game. If I like something I'll either transpose the score if we have it, or I'll play along to the version of it in my head (as long as it isn't too fast). Anything from Bach to rock can be heard in my music room. :)
  • 0

#18 elemimele

elemimele

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 765 posts
  • Member: 895612
    Joined: 17-July 16

Posted 17 May 2018 - 21:39

Given Ada Lovelace's understanding of Babbage's work (I get the impression she saw its mathematical possibilities better than he did?), I think she'd be the name to give to a very beautiful and sophisticated music-box, the sort that is nowadays only found in the best sort of museum of mechanical music. I'm not sure what instrument would be good to celebrate Marie Curie. Maybe a particularly good oboe or similar woodwind? It would celebrate her strength, uniqueness, and the fact that to this day, her story stands out in everyone's consciousness.

I had to look up the other two; thank you for making me aware of two other inspirational people.


  • 0





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: violin case, recommendations