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Alfred Prep method (piano)


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#16 sbhoa

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Posted 13 July 2018 - 11:30

 

So am I doing it all wrong? I use Tunes for Ten fingers, unashamedly in Middle C position until in book 2 when the C below middle C is introduced. Then we do pieces in that position from various books, then extending the hand position, then changing fingers on notes. It all seems a logical way of teaching children to read music. I find a lot of children get confused by all the different hand positions in PA book 1. And I haven't noticed hand tension in my pupils, in fact they're really relaxed because they love what they're playing.I grew up on Schaum which I imagine was considered a new, innovative method then. And I remember my mum realizing I was playing from finger numbers! But I was enjoying playing and soon realised that any note could be played by any finger.Maybe some of my pupils at first associate notes with certain fingers . But they move on from that, and at least they do read the fingering which is my bugbear with inherited students.

 

I personally haven't had any seen any problems with starting young children with middle C position but I am interested in learning more about the merits of different approaches - eg.  Irina Gorin's avoidance of the short fingers that Helen mentioned above. 

 

I have the same experience as you, Latin Pianist, that even if children do associate certain fingers with certain notes at the start it doesn't mean that they will in the long term. 

 

Some really do have problems telling the difference between note names and finger numbers but I have a feeling that those who have longer lasting issues with it would also have problems with any other method. 


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#17 ontheblackkeys

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Posted 13 July 2018 - 19:06

 

 

So am I doing it all wrong? I use Tunes for Ten fingers, unashamedly in Middle C position until in book 2 when the C below middle C is introduced. Then we do pieces in that position from various books, then extending the hand position, then changing fingers on notes. It all seems a logical way of teaching children to read music. I find a lot of children get confused by all the different hand positions in PA book 1. And I haven't noticed hand tension in my pupils, in fact they're really relaxed because they love what they're playing.I grew up on Schaum which I imagine was considered a new, innovative method then. And I remember my mum realizing I was playing from finger numbers! But I was enjoying playing and soon realised that any note could be played by any finger.Maybe some of my pupils at first associate notes with certain fingers . But they move on from that, and at least they do read the fingering which is my bugbear with inherited students.

 

I personally haven't had any seen any problems with starting young children with middle C position but I am interested in learning more about the merits of different approaches - eg.  Irina Gorin's avoidance of the short fingers that Helen mentioned above. 

 

I have the same experience as you, Latin Pianist, that even if children do associate certain fingers with certain notes at the start it doesn't mean that they will in the long term. 

 

Some really do have problems telling the difference between note names and finger numbers but I have a feeling that those who have longer lasting issues with it would also have problems with any other method. 

 

 

In my experience, even PA doesn't totally eliminate the problem of associating notes with specific fingers.  I had a child who got very confused with one piece where the thumb in the RH was on middle D and she kept playing E because she'd associated D with her 2nd finger.  I've had others stick their thumb down for C as well, even if their hand is in a different position and the interval between notes clearly indicates a different finger.  No one method is perfect, as has been said.

 

I also find that PA is great at the beginning for using different fingers on different notes but in level 1 once more notes are learned, it tends to get more "fixed" in 5 finger positions, which I suppose is inevitable until pupils are ready to expand hands with bigger intervals and full scale-type passages.


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#18 Aquarelle

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Posted 13 July 2018 - 19:56

 

So am I doing it all wrong? I use Tunes for Ten fingers, unashamedly in Middle C position until in book 2 when the C below middle C is introduced. Then we do pieces in that position from various books, then extending the hand position, then changing fingers on notes. It all seems a logical way of teaching children to read music. I find a lot of children get confused by all the different hand positions in PA book 1. And I haven't noticed hand tension in my pupils, in fact they're really relaxed because they love what they're playing.I grew up on Schaum which I imagine was considered a new, innovative method then. And I remember my mum realizing I was playing from finger numbers! But I was enjoying playing and soon realised that any note could be played by any finger.Maybe some of my pupils at first associate notes with certain fingers . But they move on from that, and at least they do read the fingering which is my bugbear with inherited students.

 

I personally haven't had any seen any problems with starting young children with middle C position but I am interested in learning more about the merits of different approaches - eg.  Irina Gorin's avoidance of the short fingers that Helen mentioned above. 

 

I have the same experience as you, Latin Pianist, that even if children do associate certain fingers with certain notes at the start it doesn't mean that they will in the long term. 

 

semplice you re right in saying that using the same fingers on the same notes doesn't  necessarily mean that children will always associate those notes with particular fingers. However, my experience has been that many children do have reading difficulties which are caused by too strong a note/finger association. I have also found that this is  particularly so with young children  -  those starting at six or seven. Older beginners cope better with this but even so recently had an intelligent twelve year old suddenly get stuck because, as she put it "It isn't usually that finger on that note."  I have found that the Piano Adventures series, particularly if I use the sight reading books, makes for much safer reading. In the past i used primers centred on the middle C and then G positions but since the advent of PA I have gone in that direction with better reading results. But I do teach a lot ofbvery young beginners.


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#19 sbhoa

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Posted 14 July 2018 - 11:28

You can use different fingers in early tunes using something like Tues for Ten Fingers.

When there are only two or three notes in a piece you can let them try with different fingers to see what feels more comfortable which is one of the criteria for good fingering anyway. Also when you get only G in the LH who in their right mind would choose to use finger 4? Is there any reason not to change that to something more sensible?


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#20 BannerdaleMusic

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Posted 14 July 2018 - 19:29

Tunes for Ten is a good standard starter book. There's nothing wrong with a bit of middle C and some recognisable tunes - it's got all the old favourites in, and the kids love singing along! That said all tutors have their limitations, and I always mix up the tutor books with some rote learning, Duets, exercises and theory... a bit of variety seems to help little ones the most :-)
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#21 semplice

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Posted 14 July 2018 - 23:08

Thanks everyone. I have really appreciated reading all the replies. 

 

I have been pressing the up button, assuming that it is similar to the "like" button on facebook. Is that right? 


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