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LRSM Programming Help

LRSM Piano

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#1 Dreamaurora

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Posted 10 August 2018 - 09:15

I am due to attempt my LRSM Performance for piano in slightly more than one month time and I am beginning to prepare the Program Notes and Viva.

 

I've ran into a bit of conundrum here. This is my planned program.

 

Hindemith - Interludium and Fuga Tertia in F (Free choice)

Mozart - Sonata in C Minor K 457

Schubert - Sonata in A Minor K 784

 

The program is fully memorised and ready to go, but as I plan out the program notes and Viva, I realise I have issue justifying the inclusion of the Hindemith. The 2 sonatas tie into the theme of atypical work of both composers, but the Hindemith is admittedly tacked on because I prefer to have something easy and relaxing to ease me into the program. However, on the actual day, I would choose to begin with the Quick Study anyway, so I would have around 10 minutes to get used to the piano already. On my last run-through of the program I clocked 38:30 for the Mozart and Schubert inclusive of breaks without repeats, and this is already at quite brisk tempo. If I play safe and opts for slightly slower tempi, both Sonatas would clock around 40:00. 

 

So my question, would playing just these two sonatas be appropriate for LRSM? Or should I still put one additional piece as a prelude or an encore piece? My instructor remarked that the playing two big sonatas would be more appropriate for a specialist FRSM program; LRSM he said examiners would still be more receptive towards a generalist program. Besides the Hindemith, I also have following pieces below 5 minutes ready and memorised for a concert I am preparing:

 

- Liszt's Paganini Study No 5 'La Chasse'

- Scriabin's Etude Op 8 No 12

- Elgar's Salut d'amour


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#2 mel2

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Posted 10 August 2018 - 23:20

The 3 pieces in your planned programme seem a bit similar in mood (I'm not familiar with that particular Hindemith so forgive me if I'm wide of the mark; I'm basing my opinion on other examples of his work).
I might be tempted by the Scriabin which is lovely, but that would mean your programme would be all in minor keys.(I think)
The Elgar would be a nice change of mood to finish.
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#3 Clovis

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Posted 11 August 2018 - 06:49

Have you tried putting the Hindemith between the two Sonatas? Then you could make a case for including it as a genuine interlude, with the effect of putting more musical distance between the Mozart and Schubert.

That might solve the programme note issue and any questions in the viva as to why you have chosen the Hindemith as well as having to justify the inclusion of two sonatas. Creating space between the two more similar pieces would serve to differentiate them much more.

Worth a try!
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#4 Dreamaurora

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Posted 12 August 2018 - 07:47

The 3 pieces in your planned programme seem a bit similar in mood (I'm not familiar with that particular Hindemith so forgive me if I'm wide of the mark; I'm basing my opinion on other examples of his work).
I might be tempted by the Scriabin which is lovely, but that would mean your programme would be all in minor keys.(I think)
The Elgar would be a nice change of mood to finish.

 

 

Have you tried putting the Hindemith between the two Sonatas? Then you could make a case for including it as a genuine interlude, with the effect of putting more musical distance between the Mozart and Schubert.

That might solve the programme note issue and any questions in the viva as to why you have chosen the Hindemith as well as having to justify the inclusion of two sonatas. Creating space between the two more similar pieces would serve to differentiate them much more.

Worth a try!

 

I tried playing the Scriabin right after the intense finale of the Schubert', probably not a good idea as I was basically running on fumes by then. Putting the Hindemith between the two sonata is a good option that I am considering now. Elgar after the Schubert is a great option too; there's also an arrangement of When You Wish Upon a Star in they style of Chopin's Nocturne I am considering.


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#5 The Land

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Posted 23 August 2018 - 10:42

Can't tell you anything about piano repertoire, but a Mozart sonata then a Schubert sonata doesn't look varied - I imagine you can talk at length about the development of the piano and the sonata between the one and the other for your viva, but still I'd include something of a markedly different period and form to provide contrast. 

 

I don't think you'll lose marks for saying "yes, this piece is mainly there to break up the two serious works"

 

 

 

 


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