Jump to content


Photo

Piano beginner - how/what to learn?

piano beginner

  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 Ian Wilson

Ian Wilson

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 9 posts
  • Member: 535956
    Joined: 05-October 12
  • Edinburgh

Posted 04 September 2018 - 09:40

Hi All,

 

I'm looking for a little perspective here on where to start ...

 

As an adult absolute beginner on piano, I'm a little confused by all the various method books and online resources (Playground Sessions) in how and what they are trying to teach.

 

They all seem to have you playing different simple pieces starting on a different note each time.   What is the point of that?   Are they expecting me to memorize all these different starting positions as a beginner?!

 

I can read music, especially the treble clef (I'm grade 4-5 violin).  Bass clef is new to me though.

 

The method book I have is Adult Piano Adventures level 1.    I plan to get lessons at some point, but probably not until January when I will have more free evenings.

 

Any advice appreciated.

 

Anyone else come to the piano from the violin?  With the violin you dont start position work until grade 3-4.  I understand its a bit like comparing apples to oranges, but is there not some basics that its good to nail down to begin with?

 

Thanks

Ian

 


  • 0

#2 agricola

agricola

    Prodigy

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1756 posts
  • Member: 545
    Joined: 01-February 04

Posted 04 September 2018 - 10:29

With piano it's important not to get stuck in one position -- most tutor books start with thumbs on Middle C and stay there for too long and the book you are using tries to avoid this.  A Grade 1 piano piece will often involve independent movement in both hands -- not just into another 5-finger group but with turning over or under the thumb and small stretches, so this is very different to the way one learns violin.  I would stick with your book and when you get a teacher all will become clear!


  • 2

#3 Latin pianist

Latin pianist

    Virtuoso

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3395 posts
  • Member: 711500
    Joined: 01-April 13

Posted 04 September 2018 - 11:49

I actually find sticking to middle C position for a while then gradually introducing new notes and positions by relating them to what they've already learnt works far better for my pupils than dotting around all over the place.
  • 2

#4 Ian Wilson

Ian Wilson

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 9 posts
  • Member: 535956
    Joined: 05-October 12
  • Edinburgh

Posted 04 September 2018 - 12:23

I actually find sticking to middle C position for a while then gradually introducing new notes and positions by relating them to what they've already learnt works far better for my pupils than dotting around all over the place.

 

Thats pretty much how I would have expected the process to be.    You feel a bit lost without a frame of reference. 


  • 0

#5 tulip21

tulip21

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 132 posts
  • Member: 898887
    Joined: 28-March 18

Posted 04 September 2018 - 16:28

This topic can be pretty controversial, but the book you have shouldn't be too bad. I tend to prefer methods that teach you to play interesting music right away (e.g Suziki, although you don't have to learn by ear) because it's more fun. A lot of these songs often only involve 1-2 positions, and as you progress, you move around more.
  • 0

#6 Latin pianist

Latin pianist

    Virtuoso

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3395 posts
  • Member: 711500
    Joined: 01-April 13

Posted 04 September 2018 - 17:09

Interestingly I have just had a new student. I thought she was an absolute beginner but she'd learned some piano 5 years ago. She said she'd only learnt the 5 notes in each hand going out from Middle C. I asked her to play some easy pieces in that hand position and it was obvious she was ready to progress So adding to what she'd learnt, we did Jazz Blast in Accelerated Piano Adventures Book 2 which has new LH notes with a change of hand position at the end, and has RH going over to the Bb below Middle C. She is 16 so I wonder whether adults and older beginners are more receptive to this logical approach.
  • 1

#7 Steven Carr

Steven Carr

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 129 posts
  • Member: 286204
    Joined: 16-July 11

Posted 04 September 2018 - 18:42

Basics on a piano?

 

Hard to say , because you can approach it from different angles.

 

The best thing is to start with one method book and work through that systematically.  I really don't think it matters much which one, provided you stick to it and follow its path. 

 

It's jumping around from book to book which doesn't work too well.


  • 2

#8 sbhoa

sbhoa

    Maestro

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 22911 posts
  • Member: 24
    Joined: 31-October 03
  • Tameside

Posted 04 September 2018 - 19:31

 

I actually find sticking to middle C position for a while then gradually introducing new notes and positions by relating them to what they've already learnt works far better for my pupils than dotting around all over the place.

 

Thats pretty much how I would have expected the process to be.    You feel a bit lost without a frame of reference. 

 

The frame of reference comes from knowing your keyboard geography. 

When reading music at the piano it's good to read by interval; how far i the next note from the one your are currently playing? Piano Adventures tends to encourage this.


  • 2

#9 linda.ff

linda.ff

    Maestro

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 8034 posts
  • Member: 183500
    Joined: 04-January 11
  • Cambridge

Posted 05 September 2018 - 13:18

Get a copy of A Dozen A Day book 1. not pieces, but simple technical exercises - right hand staysd in CDEFG position for most of the time in the first two units, left hand switches between thumb on middle C and little finger on the low C. Reading becomes very quick. Not an "alternative method book, soit mought not to conflict.


  • 3

#10 michael N

michael N

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 239 posts
  • Member: 309573
    Joined: 02-September 11
  • W.York's UK.

Posted 11 September 2018 - 20:11

This topic can be pretty controversial, but the book you have shouldn't be too bad. I tend to prefer methods that teach you to play interesting music right away (e.g Suziki, although you don't have to learn by ear) because it's more fun. A lot of these songs often only involve 1-2 positions, and as you progress, you move around more.

 

I self taught (for my sins). I was lost. I jumped from book to book and I really didn't feel as though I was improving. It all seemed a bit overwhelming. Then I remembered the Suzuki books. For some reason that was the one that had me focused. Finally I felt as though I was actually playing the piano albeit at a very elementary level. I got through the book but didn't really fancy book 2 (I had a look). Melanie Spanswick's Play it again is a very good book but it's more grade 2 and beyond. Might be a good one after Suzuki 1. 


  • 0





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: piano, beginner