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Constant late payers


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#46 MollyM

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Posted 29 November 2018 - 03:12

Yes I second all that's been said above and second it again!  As mentioned in another post - I had that one parent who would always, every term, take at least one month or even longer sometimes, to pay fees - but would drive the said student to their lessons without any recognition knowing full well none of the lessons were paid for.  Disgraceful.   At one point, I wondered if it was a ploy - to possibly stop coming and just not pay.

 

I have now decided that two weeks will be my absolute maximum - and after that I would advise in writing that I can no longer hold the lesson time for the child due to nonpayment.

 

Yes BadStrad - it truly is a power play, you've nailed it.  And I realise this now, looking back - that this particular parent was quite manipulative I feel, and making me wait for that period of time (when all other parents paid before the very first lesson of the term), was her way of having some control, and of course, showing disrespect.  They would drive their Mercedes to and from lessons happily knowing none of the lessons were paid for.  And I was so gracious and nice, and didn't say anything as I didn't want to make them feel bad rolleyes.gif rolleyes.gif rolleyes.gif  

 

So no.  I will be adamant about payment from now on.  I am not a charity.  And neither are you hammer action! x  I think it's ultimately important to enforce because it establishes a level of respect and basic regard, which in turn is passed on to the student.

 

Wow, you soon learn don't you?? I feel with every 'experience' teaching brings.... my T&C's get a little longer wink.png


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#47 jenny

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Posted 29 November 2018 - 09:35

Ten left thumbs, how horrible!  And how dare that nasty father!!!   Well done you for sticking to your guns.  There is no excuse for this.  It is no diferent to stealing, 

 

 

 

I had two families last year who left and who still have music belonging to me - text messages and e-mails from me all ignored. Thank goodness most families are absolutely lovely.


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#48 Hedgehog

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Posted 29 November 2018 - 11:51

I must be in a prickly sort of mood at the moment.  For the first time, I've sent out some reminders to a few late payers - my monies should have been in this week. So I've decided to remind the late ones - I've bowed to pressure to allow bank transfer payments rather than cheques, but this makes more work to check regularly that payments have been made.  Charging every half term means that the amount I'm asking for is more manageable, and I just don't want it hanging on this half term so that I'm still checking the bank into December.

Well I've had success. Interestingly I had apologetic parents on the doorstep with cheque book in hand - at a time which wasn't child's lesson time, plus cash (that old-fashioned hard currency!) from parent who was responsible for asking me to accept bank transfers because she no longer had a cheque book.  Apparently there was some problem with the electronic side of things.

Amazing - all funds in now, and before December too. party2.gif xmas_tree.gif santa2.gif


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#49 violinlove

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Posted 29 November 2018 - 13:31

I have no late payers so far this year. The two from last year have left. I spent the whole time running around after them.

I sent a more strongly worded letter out this year and I rang up a couple of parents when the payment was two days late in October.

 

I'm afraid I no longer loan out any music because of people not returning it. I have had three people quit lessons over the last few years with no notice - simply stopped coming with no explanation. They all had books on loan and despite me phoning etc, they never picked up or replied to text messages. I lost 5 books.

So I do not loan any more music. This means that everyone has to buy everything they need but it also means I am not out of pocket.

 

I know that some families are hard up so I try to make sure I choose more affordable books, of which there are plenty. I take the line now that the cost of the books is a part of the total cost (and a very small percentage when you think how  much lessons cost) and make the parents aware that these costs will be involved before the child starts lesson. I can't afford to buy a whole pile of books to loan out and have them go missing.


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#50 ten left thumbs

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Posted 02 December 2018 - 09:35

Thanks for the support.

 

I've had a shed-load of new enquiries over the last week, so I am now full as of January, and I have to say, that's helping feel better about losing this kid. I know that might sound crazy, but it's not just the money. It's also that parents talk amongst themselves. The father that was upset (that I refused to teach because he hadn't paid...), that father knows parents of other children that I teach. I had been a bit worried about blow-back in some way from the other parents. Of course, he's not obliged to tell them the truth about why he's taking Jonny out of piano lessons. He could make something up, the other parents could believe him. 

 

But, there hasn't been any blow-back, the book was returned (via other children I teach that live in their area) and everyone can see that my slots are filled. On balance I want the parents to feel like I can replace students. Sure, they can find another teacher also. But I want them to feel a bit replaceable.

 

I do take a calculated risk when I loan books out, I know. At the end of the day, it wouldn't have been a huge financial loss, but it was the principle that bothered me more. And that the dad had initially ignored my request to return the book, then said he would return it "soon" (just like he used to say he would pay me "soon"), then no book. That bothered me. So I found the price of a replacement for the book, and sent him an invoice in the post. I think he got the message (I know where he lives!)

 

You know what's really crazy? Back to the conversation outside my house where I'm refusing to teach as he hasn't paid and he's querying whether I should have charged for a lesson that was cancelled at short notice, and I'm saying I'm not sure I can continue to teach under such circumstances... After all that (and it was a cold and windy day and I didn't have a coat on), he asked me about also teaching his younger daughter. Now this little kid, I happen to love dearly as I've known her since she was a baby. I was taken aback as I don't have a lot of spaces for new students and I know the family are fussy, due to work and school commitments, about when they can come for piano. Nevertheless he wanted to know how much I would charge. My jaw dropped a bit more. You know how much I charge, I said. Then I added that as payment was a problem for just one child, I could only imagine that for two children it would be worse. 

 

I think he'd been fishing for a discount. 


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#51 Banjogirl

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Posted 02 December 2018 - 10:59

Thanks for the support.

I've had a shed-load of new enquiries over the last week, so I am now full as of January, and I have to say, that's helping feel better about losing this kid. I know that might sound crazy, but it's not just the money. It's also that parents talk amongst themselves. The father that was upset (that I refused to teach because he hadn't paid...), that father knows parents of other children that I teach. I had been a bit worried about blow-back in some way from the other parents. Of course, he's not obliged to tell them the truth about why he's taking Jonny out of piano lessons. He could make something up, the other parents could believe him.

But, there hasn't been any blow-back, the book was returned (via other children I teach that live in their area) and everyone can see that my slots are filled. On balance I want the parents to feel like I can replace students. Sure, they can find another teacher also. But I want them to feel a bit replaceable.

I do take a calculated risk when I loan books out, I know. At the end of the day, it wouldn't have been a huge financial loss, but it was the principle that bothered me more. And that the dad had initially ignored my request to return the book, then said he would return it "soon" (just like he used to say he would pay me "soon"), then no book. That bothered me. So I found the price of a replacement for the book, and sent him an invoice in the post. I think he got the message (I know where he lives!)

You know what's really crazy? Back to the conversation outside my house where I'm refusing to teach as he hasn't paid and he's querying whether I should have charged for a lesson that was cancelled at short notice, and I'm saying I'm not sure I can continue to teach under such circumstances... After all that (and it was a cold and windy day and I didn't have a coat on), he asked me about also teaching his younger daughter. Now this little kid, I happen to love dearly as I've known her since she was a baby. I was taken aback as I don't have a lot of spaces for new students and I know the family are fussy, due to work and school commitments, about when they can come for piano. Nevertheless he wanted to know how much I would charge. My jaw dropped a bit more. You know how much I charge, I said. Then I added that as payment was a problem for just one child, I could only imagine that for two children it would be worse.

I think he'd been fishing for a discount.


Astonishing. You're well out of it. They sound completely insane!

I never liked being loaned books. I'd far rather buy them because I know I'm terrible at keeping track of the loaned ones.
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#52 Dorcas

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Posted 02 December 2018 - 14:02

Just imagine that conversation in a supermarket car park?  Security guard wants to know why a customer has waltzed out of the store with a bottle of whiskey in a coat pocket and a leg of lamb down hidden in back pack or hand bag?  And teaching is just not the same thing at all!  Yes, I know, I don't teach someone how to grow a bottle of whiskey or a leg of lamb, but funnily enough, I like being paid to work.

 

edit: grammar


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