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#16 Maizie

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Posted 28 January 2019 - 08:14

:lol: Aquarelle

 

It occurs to me that adultpianist seems to have quite fixed ideas of what a music teacher should be, how they should teach, etc, and gets quite perturbed when these 'rules' aren't met.  It's simple as 'there are no rules' - if it works between student and teacher, then it works.


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#17 zwhe

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Posted 28 January 2019 - 08:58

Being good at something does not make you good at teaching that something.  This is not just true for music.  Being a good artist won't make you a good art teacher; being a good physicist won't make you a good physics teacher.  You might be both, but teaching ability doesn't necessarily follow ability.

 

Surely you HAVE to be both - if you aren't good at something, you don't have the knowledge to pass on. You could be the best piano teacher in the world, but you probably wouldn't be able to teach medicine! Good teachers without exams usually have proven performing careers, which demonstrates advanced studying at post-grade 8 level. 


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#18 SingingPython

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Posted 28 January 2019 - 10:05

I think you can be very good at teaching something if you have good knowledge and understanding of it, which may also mean having been well taught.  It is sometimes quite possible to teach someone who will be better than you at the thing you are teaching them.  A superficial example - I was never a fast swimmer but at one point in primary school enjoyed participating in a welcoming club that had a very good coach.  I recall during tryouts for our school swimming carnival, a couple of friends weren't going to bother attempting butterfly.  I told/showed them what I'd been taught about how to do it, and they swam it and beat me by a long way.


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#19 Maizie

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Posted 28 January 2019 - 12:38

zwhe - I was only describing it from the way round that a good 'doer' might make a good teacher (but not necessarily, because they are different things).

That wasn't saying anything about the reverse (whether a good teacher must by definition be a good doer)...a whole different debate :D


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#20 Gran'piano

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Posted 28 January 2019 - 13:48

 

Being good at something does not make you good at teaching that something.  This is not just true for music.  Being a good artist won't make you a good art teacher; being a good physicist won't make you a good physics teacher.  You might be both, but teaching ability doesn't necessarily follow ability.

 

Surely you HAVE to be both - if you aren't good at something, you don't have the knowledge to pass on. You could be the best piano teacher in the world, but you probably wouldn't be able to teach medicine! Good teachers without exams usually have proven performing careers, which demonstrates advanced studying at post-grade 8 level. 

 

 

 

zwhe - I was only describing it from the way round that a good 'doer' might make a good teacher (but not necessarily, because they are different things).

That wasn't saying anything about the reverse (whether a good teacher must by definition be a good doer)...a whole different debate biggrin.png

I don't think being good at anything will automatically make you a good teacher of that subject.

And although for music I would think it necessary to be a good doer to become a good teacher, it is certainly not true in certain other areas.

If it were, I would have been a total failure in the specific teaching area in which I was involved for twenty years  - and I was a LOT better than many of the 'good doers'. 

 

Back to the original thoughts of this thread - I don't think I would want a child of mine who wanted to take exams in music, to have lessons with this goal in mind from someone, however well they played, who had no experience in this particular field. I would want a teacher who not only knew the syllabus but also knew exactly how the exams 'worked'. Who could give advice on nervousness from his own experience etc.


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#21 Sylvette

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Posted 28 January 2019 - 20:00

It is also possible to be a good teacher for some students, but not so good for others.  Not so much thinking about classroom teaching, more one-to-one.  Sometimes the relationship works, sometimes it doesn't.  If the teacher and student have different expectations and aspirations or incompatible learning/teaching styles, the chances are that the experience will be less than satisfying for both parties.


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#22 Saxwarbler

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Posted 13 February 2019 - 18:34

I don't so much mind being taught by someone who 'doesn't have grades' but I do like to know they have suitable credentials to teach what I want to learn. My first clarinet teacher wasn't 'qualified' in the traditional sense. He was an engineer by trade but had played in semi-pro orchestras and theatre pits for most of his adult life. In short, he could 'walk the walk' as well as 'talk the talk'. It's useful if teachers do have qualifications but there's no substitute for one who has real experience in what it is they're teaching others to do.

I'd suggest to the OP that if this teacher's approach doesn't suit you then it's probably an indicator that you're not right for each other. Maybe think about saying "thank you but no thank you" and look elsewhere.


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#23 ten left thumbs

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Posted 14 February 2019 - 16:05

I find it odd that the OP would say:

 

"How can someone teach pupils if they have never taken any grades and therefore has no idea of how they work or what is needed to pass an exam in order to coach anyone wishing to go for grades"

 

and just a few posts later say:

 

"I think grades should be scrapped   They are clearly of little or no use"


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#24 Gordon Shumway

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Posted 27 February 2019 - 11:20

I've only ever had lessons (piano,oboe,violin) from people with performers and/or teachers diplomas from the RAM and/or RCM and that's what I recommend. Currently I get my violin lessons for £30 an hour mate's rates.

All my life I've had technique stressed.

On guitar forums I see people taking lessons from someone who has had one lesson from someone who has played along to a record in his bedroom.

Pity the fools!


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#25 Gran'piano

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Posted 01 March 2019 - 13:48

I always thought that one of the most wonderful things about music was being able to pass on one's own pleasure and satisfaction to other people.

Obviously the 'teacher' mentioned above has lit a musical spark in the mind of the 'learner'. Making music together is a wonderful thing and if the two enjoy it, why not?.

A guy or gal who has lessons from "someone who has had one lesson from someone who has played along to a record in his bedroom" is never going to be a Segovia, but I would not call them a fool. Perhaps that is not what they are aiming for. 

 

Why should someone who has lessons, passes exams up to grade whatever but plays only im private, purely for their own enjoyment get more brownie points than those two?

The level is different but so what?


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