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How Well Do Bassoons/Contrabassoons Hold Their Value?


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#1 Classical Chris

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Posted 27 January 2019 - 20:01

I was learning the bassoon a few years back (I was renting one), however at the time purchasing one, whilst just about affordable, would have taken up more of my savings than I would have liked.  I put it on hold and started the cello instead which was more affordable.

 

I'm thinking about taking it up again now I've changed careers (though possibly just contrabassoon this time because I preferred it after trying one), however I'd want to buy after renting for a couple of months.  I've also got a career dilemma which could result in me spending quite a lot of money on training in a couple of years time, depending on how things work out.  So, I'm in a position where I might want to sell an instrument I'd purchased to fund that.  At the same time, it would seem daft to miss out on a potential hobby because of something that might happen depending on aptitude/the jobs market and other factors.

 

If I were to purchase a secondhand instrument (perhaps 20-plus years old but of a good quality), what would the depreciation be like over a couple of years?  Do the instrument shops charge a lot of commission for a sale?  Also, if I were to take an interest in joining an amateur ensemble/group, would they take someone who could play the contrabassoon (and strings) but who didn't have recent bassoon experience?

 


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#2 corenfa

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Posted 28 January 2019 - 04:41

The only part of this I can shed light on is that from what I remember in orchestras (I played in orchestra in university for 5 years), there were not many pieces that required a contrabassoon. Even if all the other factors were to be favourable enough to point you towards buying a contrabassoon, you might not find much opportunity to actually play it. 


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#3 Tenor Viol

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Posted 28 January 2019 - 06:09

I have bassoonist friends. Contras are VERY expensive even for a basic student instrument.

 

I get the impression that bassoons hold their value reasonably well, but I'm not an expert. 

 

Your concern I think should be finding an instrument you like to play and enjoying it. 


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#4 Classical Chris

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Posted 29 January 2019 - 19:34

Thank you for the replies, what I'll most likely do is start renting a bassoon again at some point and take it from there.  I'd most likely choose a tutor (my previous one has moved quite far away) who also teaches contrabassoon.


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