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Teaching in student's homes


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#16 ma non troppo

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Posted 30 January 2019 - 11:45

It may not be their fault if someone cannot get to your house for a lesson, but neither are we a charity. I am also not an arbitrator of "who is deserving and who is not" . I prefer to keep things simple. The way I see it, as I teach back to back and have no free time in my teaching schedule, unless I made a very costly charge, I would be losing out financially and someone else would be missing out on lessons. Music lessons are a luxury in our society, not a necessity.

Some teachers on this forum are just too nice for their own good! As Cyrilla would say, "be TUFF"! We are businesses. That's not to say we cannot be kind and accommodating where possible, but not at our own expense.
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#17 Dorcas

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Posted 30 January 2019 - 14:17

I think Ma non troppo is spot on.  The way I look at it, if somebody asks to reschedule, I will always do my best to accommodate.  In all honesty, most students are very fair and reasonable themsleves.  


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#18 sbhoa

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Posted 30 January 2019 - 15:03

I was once asked if I did home visits for piano lessons to a household with no piano.


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#19 Dorcas

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Posted 30 January 2019 - 15:51

Snap, Sbhoa, I was asked to bring mine with me . . .


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#20 Misterioso

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Posted 30 January 2019 - 15:54

I was once asked if I did home visits for piano lessons to a household with no piano.

 

I can't help but wonder which planet these people live on. wacko.png


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#21 Violin Hero

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Posted 30 January 2019 - 16:28

The student(s)/parents of the student(s) probably though you would bring a portable keyboard with you. Rather unreasonable and they obviously hadn't thought about how any practice would take place. 


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#22 Yet another muso

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Posted 30 January 2019 - 22:42

Some teachers of course cannot teach from home themselves as they don't have the luxury of a suitable room. Indeed property prices are such these days that in the most expensive places in the country, unless you have a partner who earns well or family help, buying a property suitable for teaching from what one can earn as a musician can be near impossible. 

 

I am very lucky that the school where I teach during the daytime allows me to use their rooms late into the evening for private teaching at no charge, but without such an arrangement I would probably only be able to do private teaching by doing home visits. 


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#23 ma non troppo

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Posted 30 January 2019 - 22:47

It is a good point YAM about the property prices. I was lucky to buy my house in a time when prices were lower. I have paid for it through teaching and my income has been the primary one for the past nearly three decades - and I have also financed a new build extension to teach from too. However - with house prices as they are now, if I were starting again it would have been much harder.
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#24 Aquarelle

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Posted 31 January 2019 - 14:08

 

I was once asked if I did home visits for piano lessons to a household with no piano.

 

I can't help but wonder which planet these people live on. wacko.png

 

Obviously one where the gravity is less strong than on Earth!


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#25 Leese

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Posted 31 January 2019 - 22:16

When I first started teaching I took everything I could, and I went to people in their homes and travelled all over the place because I thought it'd get me more work if I was accommodating like that. That quickly became unsustainable (and exhausting) and so as people naturally moved on, I replaced them with new students who came to me, and I removed "I can travel to you" from all my advertising. That's worked out well.
 
I still have a few that I travel to from the olden days, but they're grouped together in the same areas and so it's doable - for example, I have four on a Saturday afternoon in Croydon scheduled one after the other, with minimal travel in between (5 minutes between houses, tops), three in Bromley close together on a Friday, and one locally on a Wednesday that I don't mind going to as it's on my way to a rehearsal. It never occurred to me to charge any extra - I just view it as "going to work".
 
Now when I take enquiries I state I teach from home and all new ones come to me, unless it's convenient for me fit them in with one of my existing runs. 

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