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#1 porilo

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Posted 03 February 2019 - 11:21

Hi! I have a pupil whom I'm teaching in China via the internet. She is about to do her piano grade 1. Her aural is very good but in the second aural test (the echo test) she always sings back the notes using sol-fa. She always gets all the notes correct as she had a very good ear but I was wondering whether that would be acceptable in the exam? Usually I tell pupils to do "la-la-la" or or hum the notes but she seems more comfortable with sol-fa. Her pitches are accurate, which is the whole object of the test so hopefully she wouldn't be marked down for using sol-fa, or would she? 


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#2 Ligneo Fistula

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Posted 03 February 2019 - 11:53

According to the current syllabus, the section on aural tests states:

For any test that requires a sung response, pitch rather than vocal quality is the object. The examiner will be happy to adapt to the vocal range of the candidate, whose responses may be sung to any vowel (or consonant followed by a vowel), hummed or whistled (and at a different octave, if appropriate). [My emphasis]

My reading of this suggests your candidate should be fine with sol-fa... unless, of course, "responses... any vowel" (note: plural, singular) is taken to mean only one vowel/consonant-vowel is allowed for all notes. I love the ambiguity of the English language.

 

Sorry, not much help!


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#3 HelenVJ

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Posted 03 February 2019 - 11:55

Yes of course solfa syllables are fine!


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#4 porilo

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Posted 03 February 2019 - 12:17

According to the current syllabus, the section on aural tests states:

For any test that requires a sung response, pitch rather than vocal quality is the object. The examiner will be happy to adapt to the vocal range of the candidate, whose responses may be sung to any vowel (or consonant followed by a vowel), hummed or whistled (and at a different octave, if appropriate). [My emphasis]

My reading of this suggests your candidate should be fine with sol-fa... unless, of course, "responses... any vowel" (note: plural, singular) is taken to mean only one vowel/consonant-vowel is allowed for all notes. I love the ambiguity of the English language.

 

Sorry, not much help!

 

That's what I thought. "Consonant followed by a vowel" doesn't really imply that all the consonants should be the same, as in "la-la-la" so I feel that sol-fa should be fine. 


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#5 Splog

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Posted 03 February 2019 - 18:59

Brilliant having a student who can sing back the aural tests in solfa biggrin.png - great big yay and well done to her!!


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#6 Cyrilla

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Posted 03 February 2019 - 23:19

Just as a matter of interest, is she using fixed-do solfa or relative solfa?


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#7 porilo

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Posted 04 February 2019 - 00:53

Thankfully relative sol-fa.This morning's test was in Db maj.
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