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How to explain pitching a note to a Year 1


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#31 Gordon Shumway

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Posted 03 March 2019 - 10:39

Apologies - I didn't mean sing it to the piano, I meant sing it solo in any key the child chooses, to assess his ability.


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#32 SingingPython

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Posted 03 March 2019 - 16:57

About the musical child who "wouldn't" sing - a bit different, but my son turned out to be a rather non-aural learner.  Attended a great young children's choir and people asked me why I "dragged him along" (I didn't!) when he "clearly didn't want to be there" since he didn't join in - eventually gave up, after a gap but still aged only 5 he started at our church children's choir - and with printed music and words in front of him he was mucch happier.  Now we did know he could sing and enjoyed it, because he sang at home, but in a group context he, I think, needed to be confident that he was going to get it right before he would actually join in.  (the following year he successfully auditioned for a chapel choir, and his 6th birthday treat was to spend an hour experimenting on our church organ) Some years later I belatedly realised he'd had similar issues learning French at school - started making much better progress and enjoying it much more when they introduced more written work at about year 6.


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#33 Tortellini

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Posted 04 March 2019 - 16:10

This thread gives me hope and also makes me feel a bit sad. I have always loved singing but I have never sung on my own (aural exams aside) when someone could hear me. Only when I am alone in the house. I still remember the auditions for our primary school choir when I was the only child excluded for not being able to sing! In church I found that I couldn't reach the same high notes as the other women (and my grandmother who took me had a GREAT voice) and I couldn't reach the low notes of the men. I was in limbo! I guess that means I have an alto voice range (?) but on my own I could never work out what notes to sing. I would love one day to find my voice!


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#34 Banjogirl

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Posted 04 March 2019 - 17:33

This thread gives me hope and also makes me feel a bit sad. I have always loved singing but I have never sung on my own (aural exams aside) when someone could hear me. Only when I am alone in the house. I still remember the auditions for our primary school choir when I was the only child excluded for not being able to sing! In church I found that I couldn't reach the same high notes as the other women (and my grandmother who took me had a GREAT voice) and I couldn't reach the low notes of the men. I was in limbo! I guess that means I have an alto voice range (?) but on my own I could never work out what notes to sing. I would love one day to find my voice!


Get yourself to a barbershop chorus. You sound like you'd make a great bass, and they're always in demand!
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#35 -Victoria-

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Posted 04 March 2019 - 17:46

Thank you all for the wonderful suggestions (and the ensuing tangential conversation!)

 

I haven't had a chance to try anything out yet, as in his first lesson back after half term it transpired that he had managed to forget everything we'd done so far (and had not practised) so we were back to finding Cs on the keyboard and working out which stave is for which hand blink.png

Might be a bit of a lost cause, but I will persevere!


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#36 Cyrilla

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Posted 04 March 2019 - 22:52

NOT a lost cause!!!   Good luck and send me a PM if I can be of any help.

 

@Tortellini - I really hope you DO find someone who can help you find your singing voice.   It's most definitely there!

 

:)


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#37 -Victoria-

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Posted 05 March 2019 - 12:43

NOT a lost cause!!!   Good luck and send me a PM if I can be of any help.

 

 

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Thank you Cyrilla - that's really kind! I will see how we go tomorrow. 


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#38 -Victoria-

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Posted 08 March 2019 - 12:48

So in our lesson this week I tried first to see if he could sing any pitches with the piano - nope. Then I tried matching my voice - nope. I tried the minor 3rd nah-nah-ne-nah-nah type thing and he was making two different noises but I wouldn't have called them pitched notes. But he seemed to enjoy it all and did surprise me when he actually accidentally found two Bs an octave apart on the piano and identified (without prompting) that they sound almost the same, so I think that's a good sign?! It is quite a struggle as lessons are only 20 mins and he has poor attention so getting anything done is a challenge. I think I will just aim to do a bit of fun singing each lesson.


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#39 Gran'piano

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Posted 08 March 2019 - 13:53

I've followed this thread but I cannot remember if anyone has suggested you singing a tone which he sings instead of the other way round and seeing if he hears them as identical?
Great idea to do it as a fun thing. If he looks at it as a 'game' instead of a task he finds very difficult your chances of success rise considerably. Good luck.

Another thought - do you use the word 'same' for the same tone? Maybe for him 'matching' is an easier concept.
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#40 Cyrilla

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Posted 08 March 2019 - 22:08

Have you tried getting him to sing hello to you?   Then you match him - or not - discuss if you were the same or different.

 

Get him realising that you can do different things with your voice - humming, speaking, singing, whispering.

 

Try doing Cobbler Cobbler as a speaking rhyme - then whisper it - then sing it (each line is just ss-mm-ss-m).   Can he tell you which voice you're using?   Ask him to do it - he decides which voice to use.

 

Happy to help week on week if you drop me a PM.

 

:)


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#41 Tortellini

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Posted 09 March 2019 - 14:57

 

 

Get yourself to a barbershop chorus. You sound like you'd make a great bass, and they're always in demand! 

 

I have quite a deep voice but I'm not a man! laugh.png  


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#42 Banjogirl

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Posted 09 March 2019 - 15:10

No no, ladies barbershop uses the same part names as the men. Our lady basses are fabulous, but they don't sing as low as men, just low for ladies. Ours go down to a d below middle c.
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